deafweekly

 

October 25, 2017
Vol. 14, No. 2

Editor: Tom Willard

Deafweekly is an independent news report for the deaf and hard-of-hearing community that is mailed to subscribers on Wednesdays and available to read at www.deafweekly.com. These are the actual headlines and portions of recent deaf-related news articles, with links to the full story. Minor editing is done when necessary. Deafweekly is copyrighted 2017 and any unauthorized use is prohibited.

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NATIONAL
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Santa Rosa, CA
THIS SIGN LANGUAGE INTERPRETER WORKS TO KEEP DEAF COMMUNITY INFORMED
Sandy McLennon is a sign language interpreter. She's also deaf. When Sonoma County gives wildfire updates, Jennifer Jacobs translates for her. Then, Sandy adds the flair and emotion of a native sign language speaker. Her colorful signing has earned her praise from all over the world. When disaster strikes, Sandy's goal is to save lives in the deaf community. / KGO-TV

Spokane, WA
DEAF COMMUNITY PROTESTS FIRING OF OFFICIAL
Members of Spokane’s deaf and hard of hearing community protested the firing of a beloved executive director at a local nonprofit on Monday. Standing in the autumn sun, about a dozen people hoisted signs calling for the reinstatement of Bart Williams, who was let go at Nexus Inland Northwest recently. They also raised posters demanding the firing of Nexus’ governing board, who they deemed to be unfit. “It appears that the board does not care for the local deaf,” said protest organizer Twina Paulus. / The Spokesman-Review

Detroit, MI
PROSECUTOR TO PROVIDE INTERPRETER FOR HEARING IMPAIRED
She complained that she couldn't communicate with Macomb County Prosecutor's Office employees because she is deaf and the office didn't provide an interpreter. The feds and the state listened. Now, the prosecutor's office has agreed to a settlement in which it will provide sign language interpreters and auxiliary aids for those who are deaf or are hearing impaired. The settlement was announced last week by the U.S. Attorney's Office. / The Detroit Free Press

New York, NY
THE NYPD IS TESTING VIDEO CONFERENCING FOR THE DEAF
Imagine trying to explain an emergency situation, while under great stress, to a police officer who can’t clearly understand you. Your words get broken down to primitive gestures, and the only way to convey any detail is to physically take the officer to the scene. The NYPD is attempting to solve that problem by embracing video conferencing for the deaf via on-demand, on-the-spot sign language translation services over the internet. / VC Daily

Tallahassee, FL
HELP MAY BE ON THE WAY FOR HEARING-IMPAIRED DRIVERS STOPPED BY COPS
A new bill filed by state Rep. Loranne Ausley, a Tallahassee Democrat, may go a long way toward helping law enforcement handle traffic stops involving the hearing impaired. HB 135 would allow drivers to voluntarily indicate hearing impairment on their vehicle tag applications. That information would be included in the Florida Crime Information Center and the Driver and Vehicle Information Database, making law enforcement aware before interacting with a driver who can’t hear them. / Florida Politics

Morganton, NC
FAMOUS GUITARIST FROM 'KORN' VISITS DEAF SCHOOL
A long-time and well-known rock 'n’ roller made a special appearance in Morganton on Friday to put on a different kind of show than normal. Brian Welch, also known as “Head,” is a member of the heavy metal band Korn and an motivational speaker who came to visit students at The North Carolina School for the Deaf to tell them about the journey he has been on that changed his life. / Morganton News Herald

Knoxville, TN
KNOXVILLE CENTER OF THE DEAF CELEBRATES 40TH ANNIVERSARY
The Knoxville Center of the Deaf celebrated its birthday Saturday afternoon as it turned 40 years old. Folks from both the deaf and hearing communities were able to celebrate with food, games, a chili cook-off contest and a costume party, just in time for Halloween. / WBIR


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INTERNATIONAL
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Winnipeg, MT, Canada
REVIEW: 'TRIBES' EXPLORES DIVIDE BETWEEN DEAF, HEARING WORLDS
As the lights dim at the start of Tribes — British playwright Nina Raine's 2010 play opening the Winnipeg Jewish Theatre's 30th season — we hear the sound of an orchestra tuning. Individually, the sounds of the instruments can convey great beauty and emotion — but when they play simultaneously without direction, the result is cacophony. That distinction between sound and noise is at the heart of Raine's play, one which raises some thoughtful questions and gets an engaging production at WJT. / CBC.ca

Portugal Cove-St. Philip’s, NL, Canada
TODD CHURCHILL POSTPONES BACKYARD RINK PROJECT
The Churchill family announced in recent days they are postponing operation of the Reason for the Rink project this winter as they advocate for better education for their son and others like him across the province. “My son, Carter, was born profoundly deaf and also was diagnosed with cerebral palsy,” Todd Churchill said Monday. / The Telegram

Ottawa, ON, Canada
UBER DRIVERS' IGNORANCE A BARRIER FOR DEAF-BLIND ATHLETE AND GUIDE DOG
Being legally deaf and blind hasn ’t stopped Kevin Frost from becoming a high-performance athlete and sought-after motivational speaker, but Uber drivers’ ignorance of the law put the brakes on him three times this month. First, a driver cancelled the fare and simply drove off after arriving to pick up Frost, 50, and spotting his guide dog by his side. Frost complained to Uber and the company assured him it wouldn’t happen again. But twice since, Frost has had to patiently explain the law until the driver agreed to take him to his destination. / Ottawa Citizen

New Zealand
FLASHING SMOKE ALARM WAKES DEAF WOMAN, SAVES LIFE
Mihiarangi Marsters is living proof smoke alarms save lives. The 71-year-old great-great-grandmother escaped as flames engulfed the kitchen of her Tikipunga home. Deaf since the age of 7, it was the special flashing smoke alarm that woke her and allowed her to grab her 4-year-old great- granddaughter and flee before it was too late. / New Zealand Herald

Dubai
DEAF MAN DANCING ARE COMING TO DUBAI
Deaf Men Dancing, a company consisting of all-male professional deaf dancers, will perform a production titled Embrace on November 6 at the Dubai Opera promenade. The 6pm, hour-long show will be open to the public and free to attend. The dance troupe’s visit is part of the UK and UAE’s Year of Creative Collaboration. / Gulf News


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LIFE & LEISURE
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Internet
OPINION: THE HEARING WORLD MUST STOP FORCING DEAF CULTURE TO ASSIMILATE
The big summer action movie “Baby Driver” made waves in the Deaf community — CJ Jones, a Deaf actor, plays the deaf foster father of the film’s protagonist, Baby. It’s exciting for two reasons: deaf characters rarely appear in big mainstream films, and it’s even rarer that deaf people play themselves. But the fight for authentic representation is far from over. Many in the Deaf community now have their eyes on the new Todd Haynes film, “Wonderstruck,” which makes its mainstream theater debut today. / NBC News

St. Louis, MO
NEANDERTHALS TOOK CARE OF DEAF BUDDY, BUCKING BAD REPUTATION
Neanderthals generally get a bad rap. Many people don't think of these extinct human relatives as much more than primitive cavemen. But scientists are learning more about their ways, and they reveal a complex story. The latest chapter involves a Neanderthal man who lived into his forties despite having a limp, missing an arm and being deaf. He most likely got there through the care of his fellow Neanderthals. / CNET


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WORKING WORLD
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Richland County, SC
FORMER GAMECOCK WAS BULLIED AS A KID FOR HIS DISABILITY. NOW HE MENTORS THEM
Even with the 80 percent hearing loss he had as a child, Jamel Bradley still knew the names that kids called him – like “Dumbo.” He remembers them making fun of his speech impairment, the “funny” way they looked at his ears and hearing aids and the mornings of crying to his mother about not wanting to go to school. Now a senior deputy with the Richland County Sheriff’s Department, Bradley gets up and goes to school every day as a school resource officer. / The State

Boiling Springs, NC
UNIVERSITY HONORS PASTOR, DEAF MINISTRY LEADER
Deaf minister, missionary and church planter Daniel Calhoun Johnson Jr., formerly of Wilson, has been posthumously inducted into Gardner-Webb University’s Gallery of Distinguished Alumni. Johnson became deaf when he was almost 9 years old. While in high school, he started looking for a small Christian college that would provide interpreters for deaf students. Unable to locate any, Johnson contacted the Rev. Jerry Potter, a North Carolina missionary to the deaf. / The Wilson Times

Frederick, MD
HOW ADVISERS CAN WORK WITH DEAF CLIENTS
Since getting my start in the mid-1980s, I [Lee Kramer] have made it my mission to work with and help other deaf individuals with their finances. But today the deaf community at large remains underserved when it comes to accessing financial guidance, since there are still few other advisers (hearing or non-hearing) who cater to this group. Advisers can offer valuable support to deaf individuals by better understanding the intricacies of working with these clients. / The Wall Street Journal


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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT
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Hollywood, CA
'WONDERSTRUCK': WHY SIGN LANGUAGE IS USED IN ONLY HALF OF THE MOVIE
Wonderstruck intercuts between two parallel plots: In 1927, a deaf girl living in Hoboken heads to New York City in search of a celebrated actress, while in 1977, an orphaned boy is struck deaf and runs away from his home in Minnesota to New York in hopes of finding answers about his past. So why is sign language only used in half of the movie? It isn’t used in the Amazon and Roadside drama’s 1920s-set scenes because it wasn’t recognized as a legitimate means of communication during that time period. / Hollywood Reporter

See Also WILL 'WONDERSTRUCK' BREAK THIS LONGSTANDING OSCAR RECORD? / Refinery29

See Also I DON'T KNOW WHAT MY DEAF CHILD IS GOING THROUGH. 'WONDERSTRUCK' HELPED ME UNDERSTAND / The Washington Post

San Francisco, CA
DEAF PAINTER DISCUSSES BEING AN ARTIST WITH A DISABILITY
According to a 2012 Census report, 56.7 million Americans have a disability. This figure translates to roughly 19 percent of the population – making people with disabilities the largest minority group in the country. But despite the size of this demographic, people with disabilities have the lowest numbers of educational attainment and work participation – facts that queer and deaf artist Bex knows all too well, and believes heavily impacts artists with disabilities. “Having the time and the space to create art is a luxury,” said Bex, who uses only one name. / The Huffington Post

New Orleans, LA
DEAF ARTIST MAKES HER MARK WITH FESTIVAL POSTER ART
It is often said that greatness is forged through adversity and the rise of Gretna artist Christy Works-Boutte exemplifies this philosophy. She is a deaf artist who has captured the essence of Louisiana through paintings that reflect the customs, culture and flavor of her state. Her work has caught the attention of media publications and the artistic community in New Orleans at large. / The Times-Picayune

Internet
FEATURE FILM SEEKING A DEAF CHILD ACTOR FOR A LEAD ROLE
Indie feature “The Parts You Lose” is gearing up for production in Winnipeg, Canada, and is in search of one of its leads. The story follows Wesley, “a deaf boy who attends a school with other deaf students.” He has a strained relationship with his father, who is embarrassed by his son, so he begins to form a bond with another outcast “against better judgment.” Bialy/Thomas & Associates is looking for an actor who can play Wesley, who is 9–12, in this leading role. / Backstage

New York, NY
DEAF POET'S VISUAL POETRY: CREATIVE STORYTELLING WITHOUT WORDS
Poet Douglas Ridloff creates American Sign Language poetry and performs at ASL Slam, a creative outlet for deaf people. (Video) / NBC News


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SPORTS
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Phoenix, AZ
HOW FOOTBALL AT PHOENIX SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF HELPS STUDENTS GROW
The sideline of a deaf school is a little different than most. But after growing accustomed to the hushed warm-ups and stretching, it’s largely the same. Football is football, and Phoenix Day School for the Deaf plays the game the same way as any other 1A high school – eight-on-eight, on an 80-yard field. It’s not a silent sideline. There are cheerleaders, waving pom-poms to the beat of a drum. The deaf can’t hear it, but they can feel it, and it rattles like a metronome throughout the game. / USA Today

Gainesville, FL
DEAF COMMUNITY GETS LIFT ON FOOTBALL SATURDAYS
Standing on the 15-yard line, Monica Ditch stared up into the roughly 90,000 faces in front of her and began performing the “Star Spangled Banner” with only her hands. As UF director of bands Jay Watkins cues the opening drum roll for the national anthem, the Swamp now sees a visual presentation of “The Star-Spangled Banner,” performed by Ditch and five other students. After three years in the band, Ditch opted for the less time-consuming duty of signing the national anthem. / Gainesville Sun

New York, NY
READY, SET, GONE! THE N.F.L.'S DISAPPEARING HUDDLE
For more than a century, the huddle has been one of the most defining fixtures of American football, a sacrosanct 11-man oval where the likes of Johnny Unitas reshaped plays on the fly, Joe Montana cracked jokes to soothe anxious teammates and Roger Staubach diagnosed the hurt, the tired and the “spitting mad.” The origin of the huddle appears to date to the 1890s, when it was first used by players at a school for the deaf, Gallaudet University, where quarterbacks had been communicating to teammates using sign language. / The New York Times


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MILESTONES
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Aardmore, OK
OSD LIBRARIAN USED HER HERITAGE TO TEACH COUNTLESS STUDENTS
Family, friends and coworkers will remember Susan Galloway as a dedicated educator, a dear friend, a natural-born educator, a scrapbooker and a celebrity within the international deaf community. Galloway, the librarian for the Oklahoma School for the Deaf in Sulphur from 1991 to 2016, was the great-great-great-granddaughter of Laurent Clerc, cofounder of the American School for the Deaf, the first school of its kind in the United States. Galloway passed away in August at the age of 68. / Daily Aardmoreite


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EMPLOYMENT
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You can advertise your job openings here for just $20 a week (up to 100 words, 10 cents each add'l word). To place your ad, send the announcement to mail@deafweekly.com.

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School of Education Department of Specialized Education Services
Assistant Professor – Tenure Track
Professions in Deafness

Minimum Qualifications include the following:
• Earned doctorate in a deaf-related field such as interpreting, deaf education, advocacy, ASL (Linguistics), Deaf studies, special education (ABD considered)
• Minimum of three years professional employment with D/deaf or hard-of-hearing individuals as an interpreter, teacher, or service personnel
• Demonstrated, or potential to demonstrate, research and scholarship activities focused on topics related to D/deaf or hard-of-hearing individuals and/or services for the D/deaf

Candidates who are of color, are Deaf or Deaf/Blind, have varying sexual orientations, or are from diverse cultural backgrounds are encouraged to apply.

Starting date: August 1, 2018
Salary: Competitive and commensurate with experience and qualifications.
Application Deadline: A review of applications will begin November 15
Apply here: https://jobsearch.uncg.edu/postings/9136
For questions, contact Search Committee Co-Chairs:
Mr. Sam Parker (sdparker@uncg.edu) or Dr. Claudia Pagliaro (cmpaglia@uncg.edu)

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NEW CAREER OPPORTUNITIES IN PITTSBURGH AND GLENSIDE

PAHrtners Deaf Services is a dynamic team of behavioral health professionals serving deaf and hard of hearing children and adults. Located outside of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, PAHrtners provides residential and outpatient services to deaf and hard of hearing children, adolescents, and adults. Over 85% of our staff members are deaf or hard of hearing!

PAHrtners is rapidly growing and expanding. Whether you are a high school graduate, recent college graduate, or a professional with many years of experience in the field of human services, we have a career-building position waiting for you! E.O.E.

PAHrtners is looking for dedicated, motivated, and energetic individuals who are fluent in American Sign Language and knowledgeable about Deaf culture to fill the following positions:

Residential Counselors for Deaf Adults with Intellectual Disabilities – Full time, part time, on call; Glenside and Pittsburgh locations. Minimum HS diploma required.

Blended Case Manager – Full time; Glenside and Pittsburgh locations. Minimum HS diploma with 12 credits in social sciences required.

Residential Counselors for Residential Treatment Facility for Adolescents
– Full Time; Glenside location. Minimum of one years’ related experience required.

Therapist/Psychosocial Rehabilitation Counselor
- Full Time; Glenside location. Minimum BA/BS in human services required.

Training Coordinator – Full Time. Glenside location. Travels to Pittsburgh as needed. Education requirements flexible and based on experience. Must be proficient in ASL.

Outpatient Therapist – Part Time. Glenside location. Must be eligible for LCSW or LPC in PA. Must have MSW or equivalent. Must be proficient in ASL.

Assistant Office Manager – Full Time. Glenside location. Minimum high school diploma with 5 years’ management experience.

Visit our Web page at http://www.pahrtners.com/careers/ to learn more about each position. 

Send your letter of intent and resume to:
Joel Skelton, Assistant Office Manager
PAHrtners Deaf Services, 614 N. Easton Road, Glenside, PA 19038
Email: jskelton@pahrtners.com Fax: 215.392.6065

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Advocates in Framingham, MA is Hiring!

Advocates is seeking talented professionals to join our team, providing health services within the Deaf and Hard of Hearing Community.

Awake Overnight Direct Care Counselor: Remain awake, alert and responsive to the needs of the clients throughout the shift, assist clients with morning activities.
• Qualifications: High school diploma or equivalent degree, fluency in ASL.

Community Crisis Stabilization BA Level Clinician:  Provide mental health and substance abuse services.
• Qualifications: MA and 2 years’ experience OR BA/BS and 5 years’ experience.

Direct Care Counselor: Supervise daily activities, provide support/guidance/role modeling. All shifts available!
• Qualifications: BA/BS; or HS diploma/GED and 1 year experience.

Outpatient Clinician: Provide comprehensive outpatient counseling/therapy to children, adults and families in need of services.
• Qualifications: MSW or MA in related field and 1 year experience in outpatient setting.

Senior Direct Care Counselor: Supervise daily activities, provide support/guidance/role modeling.  Coordinate/monitor administrative/clinical functions.
• Qualifications: BA/BS and 2 years’ experience; or HS Diploma/GED and 3 years’ experience.

Skills Instructor - Autism Services: Must be ASL-Fluent! Responsibility for assigned individuals and for the implementation of individuals’ Day Habilitation Services Plans.
• Qualifications: High School diploma or GED and 1 year experience in training program for individuals with developmental disabilities.

Minimum Qualifications Include:
• ASL fluency.
• Valid driver's license/reliable transportation.
• Related education (as applicable).

Visit www.Advocates.org/Careers to apply today!

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