deafweekly

 

December 13, 2017
Vol. 14, No. 9

Editor: Tom Willard

Deafweekly is an independent news report for the deaf and hard-of-hearing community that is mailed to subscribers on Wednesdays and available to read at www.deafweekly.com. These are the actual headlines and portions of recent deaf-related news articles, with links to the full story. Minor editing is done when necessary. Deafweekly is copyrighted 2017 and any unauthorized use is prohibited.

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NATIONAL
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Oklahoma City, OK
DA CLEARS OKC POLICE OFFICER IN FATAL SHOOTING OF DEAF MAN
An Oklahoma City police officer who fatally shot a deaf man in September "was acting in self-defense," Oklahoma County District Attorney David Prater said Friday. The district attorney cleared Sgt. Christopher Barnes, an eight-year veteran, of any wrongdoing in the deadly Sept. 19 shooting of Magdiel Sanchez, who was deaf and developmentally disabled. Sanchez was shot after failing to comply with officers' commands to drop a 2-foot metal pipe he was aggressively swinging while approaching the officers, Prater said. / The Oklahoman

San Antonio, TX
WOMAN GETS 45 YEARS IN FATAL SHOOTING OF DEAF MAN IN 2016
A San Antonio woman convicted of murder in October was sentenced Thursday to 45 years in prison for that fatal shooting of a deaf man on the porch of her East Side apartment in 2016. After contradictory statements that Michelle Chase made to police were shown to a Bexar County jury at her trial, it took the panel three hours to find her guilty of murder for shooting William Farr, 50. / San Antonio Express-News

Atlanta, GA
TEENS ASSAULTED HEARING-IMPAIRED STUDENT, FILMED INCIDENT
Two teenagers accused of beating a disabled student at an Atlanta high school face harsher charges after video of the attack surfaced on social media, Channel 2 Action News reported Tuesday. The teens were initially suspended for a day and forced to apologize, the disabled student’s mother, Kimberly Flournoy, told the news station. But when video surfaced and showed Flournoy’s daughter being punched, getting her hair pulled and being teased, she demanded harsher punishment. / Atlanta Journal Constitution

Alexandria, VA
MEDICAL CENTER AGREES TO SETTLE CLAIM WITH INDIVIDUAL WHO IS DEAF
The U.S. Attorney’s Office announced a $121,000 settlement agreement under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) with the Spotsylvania Regional Medical Center (SRMC), a wholly-owned, indirect subsidiary of HCA Holdings, Inc. located in Fredericksburg, in a case in which the hospital failed to furnish sign language interpreter services to an individual who is deaf during the provision of medical services to her and her mother. / US DOJ

San Francisco, CA
SF'S FIRST-EVER DEAF-OWNED RESTAURANT TO FRANCHISE
Mozzeria in the Mission has a history of being a pioneer in the local and national food landscape. When it opened in 2011, it was the city ’s first-ever deaf-owned restaurant. At the time, it may have been the first of its kind in any major U.S. city, and it remains one of only a few in the entire country. Now, the pizza outfit has plans to franchise, but to do so, it once again has to do something nobody else has done. / San Francisco Chronicle

Tuscaloosa, AL
UNIV. OF ALABAMA WILL STUDY IMPROVING TORNADO WARNINGS FOR THE DEAF
Two University of Alabama faculty members have been awarded a $251,850 federal grant to study how to improve tornado warnings for members of the deaf, blind and deaf-blind communities. Jason C. Senkbeil and Darrin Griffin will use the grant to build and test a split-screen system whereby deaf people can view a local weather broadcast showing a meteorologist on one side and an ASL interpreter on the other. / Tuscaloosa News

Cincinnati, OH
87-YEAR-OLD BLIND, DEAF MAN DIES IN HOUSE FIRE
A man died and his daughter was injured in an early morning house fire Sunday in Carthage, Cincinnati firefighters said. The two-story home caught fire just before 3:30 a.m., officials said. Firefighters rescued one person from the home. That person, identified as Henry Wayne Webb, 82, was taken to the hospital and later died, firefighters said. He was deaf and legally blind. / WLWT

Bixby, OK
'DEAF CHILD AREA' ROAD SIGN SPARKS CONVERSATION
Roads signs meant to alert drivers to children with hearing disabilities are grabbing attention in Bixby. The signs are also up in some Tulsa neighborhoods too and are meant to make drivers aware that children in the area may not hear approaching cars. One Bixby neighbor, April King, told FOX23 that seeing the signs helps put her at ease. They helped spark a conversation in her neighborhood about whether her own son may hear a car's honk. / KOKI FOX 23

Zeeland, MI
SCHOOL RAISES MORE THAN $13,000 FOR FIRST DEAF STUDENT
Jacob Feak is a 6th grader Zeeland Christian School, and he is the school's first deaf student. He started attending the school this year with an interpreter, but the Feak family along with the school found themselves at a crossroad. They needed to come up with $57,000 in order to keep that interpreter for three years. On Friday, Dec. 8, the school held a fundraiser and managed to collect more than $13,000. / WZZM

New York, NY
ASTRONOMY FOR THE HEARING IMPAIRED: NEW LIST SHOWS SIGNS FOR 47 TERMS
It may now be a bit easier for hearing-impaired people to discuss and study the cosmos. A team of scientists and educators has just released a list of 47 common astronomy terms — such as comet, galaxy, asteroid and telescope — as rendered via signs in a number of different languages, including German, Portuguese and Japanese. The list is the first international comparative compilation of its kind for this particular subject matter, project team members said. / Space.com

Trenton, NJ
LAWMAKERS OK TASK FORCE TO STUDY HEARING-LOSS SERVICES
The new year could bring a detailed review of New Jersey regulations, policies, and programs designed to support individuals of all ages who are dealing with hearing loss, the third most common chronic health condition nationwide. The Assembly approved a Democratic-led proposal Thursday to establish a task force comprising state officials and outside experts to examine the level of services and supports now available to deaf and hearing-impaired individuals and to recommend potential improvements. / NJ Spotlight


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INTERNATIONAL
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China
DEAF-MUTE FOOD DELIVERYMAN MOVES THOUSANDS IN CHINA
China's food-delivery industry is booming, and customers' complaints never ends. However, this week, one customer from Hangzhou, eastern China's Zhejiang province, apologized online after getting mad at a food deliveryman. "I continuously got phone calls but no one talked on the other side," the customer wrote online. "I god mad at the deliveryman but then I received a text from him." The text reads "sorry I am a deaf-mute deliveryman." / Ecns.cn

China
DEAF TEACHER STRIVES TO MAKE LEARNING FUN
She was born deaf and while Anita Yu On-lam went to a school for the hearing-impaired, she struggled to learn because teachers did not use sign language during lessons. “Teachers there only taught using speech [so] it was mainly guesswork in the classroom,” Yu, who cannot hear anything at all without the help of hearing aids, said of her experience. Yu, now 38, became a sign language teacher about 10 years ago. / South China Morning Post

New Zealand
DEAF PATIENTS AT RISK AS HOSPITAL STRUGGLES WITH LACK OF INTERPRETERS
The safety of deaf patients is being put at risk due to a lack of  hospital staff who know sign language. The families of patients and staff not trained in sign language are being left to pass on health information, raising concerns at Palmerston North Hospital. A recent MidCentral District Health Board operations report said family members or staff often had to provide sign language services to patients which was not safe as they were not trained. / Stuff.co.nz

India
MAJORITY OF DEAF EMPLOYEES NOT SATISFIED WITH THEIR SALARY: SURVEY
Deaf employees in India are not satisfied with their salary, as per a report by Centum Foundation, the philanthropic arm of Centum Learning (a Bharti Group company). The report, ‘Working experiences of Deaf Employees in India’ said that 52 percent of the respondents are not satisfied with their salary. They feel they are underpaid compared to the amount of work they undertake. / Money Control

Toronto, ON, Canada
THE SCARIEST PART OF BEING DEAF IS LOSING THE PEOPLE AROUND YOU
This year, I have started to lose my hearing in a significant way. I've struggled in this process, which, at times, has left me feeling frustrated, isolated and scared. I'm writing this essay to help convince myself this is really happening. Also to tell others what it is like to lose your hearing. People need to be told because hearing loss is an invisible disability. / The Globe and Mail

Merseyside, England
PEOPLE WERE WARNING ABOUT A MAN 'PRETENDING' TO BE DEAF ...
The truth behind a deaf man knocking on doors and selling paintings in St Helens has been revealed. Hundreds of people posted on social media after people said a man, or possibly multiple people, was going around the town knocking knocking on doors on Sunday afternoon. But a spokeswoman for the Merseyside Police said they “spoke to the man and found out he was legitimate." / Liverpool Echo

Colchester, England
DEAF CHILDREN LOVE THE MAGIC OF MUSIC TOO
Deaf children not being able to enjoy and participate in music activities is a huge misconception. Having a hearing impairment alters the sounds but it does not stop the child-like desire to thump on a drum, or to feel the sensations created by different instruments. At Lexden Primary School’s Unit for Hearing Impaired Pupils, music therapy is being used to help build confidence and resilience among its young people. / Gazette

Israel
THIS BLIND AND DEAF BACKPACKER IS TRAVELING THE WORLD
When Tony Giles was 9 months old, doctors discovered that he had a rare disorder that made him very sensitive to light. "I spent my first few years of life living in darkness whenever possible," the British traveler wrote on his website. Eventually, he got dark sunglasses, and ventured outside. "I played in the street with my non-disabled friends, learning to listen for traffic," Giles continued. "My street was a cul-de-sac and I knew the traffic came from one direction." / From the Grapevine


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LIFE & LEISURE
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Plainville, MA
WOOD ELEMENTARY GETS A LESSON IN WHAT IT MEANS TO BE DEAF
In Cece Bell’s graphic novel “El Deafo,” a young bunny turns her deafness into a superpower — and her differences into something she can embrace and wear confidently. But it wasn’t always that way. The bunny and main character is based on Bell herself, who grew up deaf. Throughout the story the character struggles with her identity at times and the different issues she faces that a hearing bunny may not. / The Sun Chronicle

Days Creek, OR
WESTERN DEAF CAMP MEETING CELEBRATES 40 YEARS
The annual Western Deaf Camp Meeting was held July 9–16 at Milo Adventist Academy in Days Creek, Ore. This was an exciting event because this was the 40th anniversary of this camp meeting. This camp meeting was nearly historic with a large attendance of 143 people. / Gleaner Now

Flagstaff, AZ
HOLIDAY DINNER BRINGS JOY TO PARENTS, FAMILIES OF DEAF, BLIND CHILDREN
When Ariele Vest, 6, walked into the gym at Kinsey Elementary for the Arizona School for the Deaf and Blind holiday dinner, she had one goal in mind -- she was going to meet to Santa. Ariele, like many of the 200-plus children and parents at the dinner, is deaf, and her father, Seth Vest, is overjoyed that six years of going to this holiday dinner has helped her become a fluent and outspoken sign language speaker. / Arizona Daily Sun

Kansas City, KS
FIREFIGHTER, WIFE, RAISING MONEY FOR DEAF INTERNATIONAL
A KCKFD firefighter and his wife are selling shirts to raise money for Deaf International. Josh Wagner and his wife are behind the shirts. The shirts feature the KCKFD firefighting seal with the letters "KCK" spelled in sign language. The couple created the shirts after they discovered their newborn daughter is deaf. / KSHB

Cincinnati, OH
SIGNING WITH SANTA: CENTER HOLDS EVENT FOR KIDS
It was a busy weekend for Santa Claus. He was at the Hearing Speech and Deaf Center of Greater Cincinnati for a "Signing with Santa." Children ten and under were able to meet Santa and take pictures with him. / WKRC


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WORKING WORLD
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Internet
AT&T ROLLS OUT REAL-TIME TEXT COMMUNICATION SYSTEM FOR HEARING IMPAIRED
For the longest time – and we mean like 50 years long – a system called TTY or “text telephone” was introduced so that hearing impaired people could communicate over a telephone. It required special equipment on both sides and it was always a TTY-to-TTY session, but it worked well and is still in place today. With the progress of technology, AT&T is now introducing a new system that will improve on everything the TTY system allowed hearing impaired people to do. / Android Community

Phoenix, AZ
SHERRI COLLINS FINDS THE JOURNEY IS THE BEST PART OF LIFE
Born deaf, Sherri Collins' early childhood was one of isolation and sadness. But even before she hit her teens, her deafness had started to widen her world. Collins, executive director of the Arizona Commission for the Deaf and the Hard of Hearing, grew up in the small town of Bourbonnais, Illinois. / Phoenix Business Journal

Eau Claire, WI
PROFESSOR BRINGS AWARENESS TO DEAF CULTURE IN EAU CLAIRE
In this silent classroom, bodily movement does the talking and the words couldn’t be any more clear. This is the everyday classroom lesson plan for Nicole Jones. No spoken words are ever exchanged between student and teacher. “It really is the best way to learn American Sign Language,” Jones said. / Blugold Media

Marion, OH
DEAF WOMAN FINDS EMPLOYMENT THROUGH MCBDD
Jane Honea-Krajewski may be deaf and non-speaking, but she is not silent. She has a strong, determined personality that draws people to her. These character traits, along with a little help from the Marion County Board of Developmental Disabilities (MCBDD) and Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities (OOD), landed her a job at Marion Goodwill. / Marion Star

Austin, TX
THIS AGENCY HELPS MARKETERS REACH DEAF CONSUMERS
There are agencies that specialize in targeting women, various ethnic cohorts and demographic segments, but there is one group that has been largely ignored: the deaf, a community of more than 30 million people in the U.S. and about 360 million worldwide. An agency called CSD Creative is looking to change that. [Editor's note: There are not more than 30 million deaf people in the U.S. It's more like half a million.] / Ad Age


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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT
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San Antonio, TX
DEAF STUDENT DEFIES ODDS, CHRISTMAS WISH COMES TRUE
A Castle Hills family is getting the No. 1 gift on their Christmas list this year: Having their son, who suffers from hearing loss, perform on the stage for his school play. Dozens of deaf students from the Sunshine Cottage School for Deaf Children rehearsed for their holiday play Thursday morning at Trinity University. Reese Vines was one of those students. His family calls his role in the play a miracle. / KENS 5 TV


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SPORTS
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Danville, KY
HIS CAR BROKE DOWN IN KENTUCKY NEARLY 30 YEARS AGO. HE GOT A JOB AND STUCK AROUND
A career in high school athletics was something Billy Lange wanted ever since he was a star athlete at Florida School for the Deaf. Danville, Ky., was not a stage where his childhood fantasies played. Lange had never even been to the town of about 16,000 before a loving gesture left him stranded in Boyle County for a week in the summer of 1988. Fast forward 29 years and Lange, 55, has now spent the majority of his life in Danville. / Lexington Herald Leader

See Also A LOOK INSIDE THE KENTUCKY SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF ATHLETIC PROGRAM / Lexington Herald Leader

Roanoke, VA
DEAF SALEM FOOTBALL PLAYER CONTINUES TO BEAT THE ODDS
The Salem High School football team has overcome countless obstacles this season in order to make it to the state championship this weekend. But for one player, it's been a little more difficult than for most. Brad Moushegian is busy getting ready for Salem's state championship football game on Saturday. "I've been deaf since my whole life," said Brad. / WSLS

Chicago, IL
REFEREE BREAKING BARRIERS
It all started with an ad in the local newspaper. Living in Lincoln, Nebraska in 2004, U.S. Soccer Grade 7 referee Andrew Kirst saw that a high school game needed a referee. He gave them a call, shared with them his experience and got the gig. With whistle in hand, he hasn’t stopped since then. “Being a referee, you get to help future generations learn the game so they can become top players,” Kirst said. “Plus, it’s a good work out too and no two games are ever the same so I’ll never be bored.” / U.S. Soccer


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EMPLOYMENT
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You can advertise your job openings here for just $20 a week (up to 100 words, 10 cents each add'l word). To place your ad, send the announcement to mail@deafweekly.com.

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Advocates in Framingham, MA is Hiring!

Advocates is seeking talented professionals to join our team, providing health services within the Deaf and Hard of Hearing Community.

Awake Overnight Direct Care Counselor:
Remain awake, alert and responsive to the needs of the clients throughout the shift, assist clients with morning activities.
• Qualifications: High school diploma or equivalent degree, fluency in ASL.

BA Clinician: The BA Clinician will provide intakes, treatment planning, case management, assessments, and 1:1 and/or group sessions for clients in the Deaf Respite
• Qualifications: Bachelor’s degree in related field and two years’ experience.

Direct Care Counselor: Supervise daily activities, provide support/guidance/role modeling. All shifts available!
• Qualifications: BA/BS; or HS diploma/GED and 1 year experience.

Outpatient Clinician:
Provide comprehensive outpatient counseling/therapy to children, adults and families in need of services.
• Qualifications: MSW or MA in related field and 1 year experience in outpatient setting.

Senior Direct Care Counselor:
Supervise daily activities, provide support/guidance/role modeling.  Coordinate/monitor administrative/clinical functions.
• Qualifications: BA/BS and 2 years’ experience; or HS Diploma/GED and 3 years’ experience.

Minimum Qualifications Include:
• ASL fluency.
• Valid driver's license/reliable transportation.
• Related education (as applicable).

Visit www.Advocates.org/Careers to apply today!

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NORTHEAST ARC IS HIRING!

Do you know ASL? We are looking for employees that want to make a difference in the lives of adults with developmental disabilities, who are also deaf. Positions are available in Lynn, Salem, Swampscott and Beverly, MA. As an employee, you will provide direct care, using various communication skills including gestural, written and Signed English. We offer an excellent benefits package, paid trainings and the support you will need to become a successful part of our experienced, long-term team of professionals. For additional information or to send your resume, please apply online at www.ne-arc.org.

Compensation: $12-12.50 for per diem shifts and $14-$14.50 for FT shifts.

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NEW CAREER OPPORTUNITIES IN PITTSBURGH AND GLENSIDE

PAHrtners Deaf Services is a dynamic team of behavioral health professionals serving deaf and hard of hearing children and adults. Located outside of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, PAHrtners provides residential and outpatient services to deaf and hard of hearing children, adolescents, and adults. Over 85% of our staff members are deaf or hard of hearing!

PAHrtners is rapidly growing and expanding. Whether you are a high school graduate, recent college graduate, or a professional with many years of experience in the field of human services, we have a career-building position waiting for you! E.O.E.

PAHrtners is looking for dedicated, motivated, and energetic individuals who are fluent in American Sign Language and knowledgeable about Deaf culture to fill the following positions:

Residential Counselors for Deaf Adults with Intellectual Disabilities – Full time, part time, on call; Glenside and Pittsburgh locations. Minimum HS diploma required.

Blended Case Manager – Full time; Glenside and Pittsburgh locations. Minimum HS diploma with 12 credits in social sciences required.

Residential Counselors for Residential Treatment Facility for Adolescents
– Full Time; Glenside location. Minimum of one years’ related experience required.

Therapist/Psychosocial Rehabilitation Counselor
- Full Time; Glenside location. Minimum BA/BS in human services required.

Training Coordinator – Full Time. Glenside location. Travels to Pittsburgh as needed. Education requirements flexible and based on experience. Must be proficient in ASL.

Outpatient Therapist – Part Time. Glenside location. Must be eligible for LCSW or LPC in PA. Must have MSW or equivalent. Must be proficient in ASL.

Assistant Office Manager – Full Time. Glenside location. Minimum high school diploma with 5 years’ management experience.

Visit our Web page at http://www.pahrtners.com/careers/ to learn more about each position. 

Send your letter of intent and resume to:
Joel Skelton, Assistant Office Manager
PAHrtners Deaf Services, 614 N. Easton Road, Glenside, PA 19038
Email: jskelton@pahrtners.com Fax: 215.392.6065

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