deafweekly

 

November 20, 2013
Vol. 10, No. 5

Editor: Tom Willard

Deafweekly is an independent news report for the deaf and hard-of-hearing community that is mailed to subscribers on Wednesdays and available to read at www.deafweekly.com. These are the actual headlines and portions of recent deaf-related news articles, with links to the full story. Minor editing is done when necessary. Deafweekly is copyrighted 2013 and any unauthorized use is prohibited.

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NATIONAL
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Pittsburgh, PA
AMERICAN SOLDIER CHARGED IN IRAQ KILLINGS OF DEAF, UNARMED TEENS
An Army small-kill team leader is charged by military investigators with two counts of murder in the fatal shootings of two deaf, unarmed Iraqi youths in March 2007, an incident first made public in a Tribune-Review investigative report last year. Then-Staff Sgt. Michael Barbera is accused of killing Ahmad Khalid al-Timmimi, 15, and his brother Abbas, 14, as they tended to cattle in a palm grove near As Sadah, an Iraqi village about 50 miles northeast of Baghdad. / Pittsburgh Tribune-Review

Washington, DC
HEARING LOSS A SILENT MILITARY EPIDEMIC
The toll from a decade of war in Iraq and Afghanistan is high. Almost 7,000 U.S. service members have lost their lives, with more than 50,000 listed as wounded in action. Thanks to wounded-warrior efforts, the nation is more aware of the dangers of traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic stress disorder and of the challenges and possibilities for amputees using prosthetic devices. But military men and women, in far greater numbers than the Pentagon numbers reflect, have sacrificed something else that is too seldom acknowledged: their hearing. / Washingon Post News Service

El Cerrito, CA
TEEN KILLED ON BART TRACKS IN EL CERRITO
Fausto Delgado took his own life on Tuesday morning. His classmates at El Cerrito High School remember the junior as smart and silly. The 16-year-old died after he was hit by a BART train at the El Cerrito del Norte station at 5:15 a.m. Students at the school tell KRON that Delgado was deaf. / KRON4

Detroit, MI
MICHIGAN DEVELOPING REGULATIONS TO GOVERN DIFFICULT AREA OF DEAF AND HARD-OF-HEARING INTERPRETER SERVICES
New regulations are coming in Michigan that govern the way in which hospitals, physician offices, pharmacies and other medical businesses offer interpreter services to the deaf and hard of hearing. And the proposed regulations — covering video remote conferencing, minimum educational requirements, credentials, testing standards, continuing education, and license suspension and revocation — appear to be long in the making. / Crain's Detroit Business

Talladega, AL
AIDB LAUNCHES STATEWIDE DEAF-BLIND INITIATIVE WITH FEDERAL GRANT
The Alabama Institute for the Deaf and Blind is beginning a statewide initiative to identify and help students who are both deaf and blind closer to their homes. AIDB will receive a U.S. Department of Education grant totaling $925,475 over the next five years, and will use it to implement the Alabama Initiative for Children and Youth who are Deaf-Blind. / al.com

Orlando, FL
KNIGHTS SEEK ACCOMMODATIONS FOR DEAF
Since his freshman orientation, Jacob Salem has attempted to make getting involved on campus more accessible for deaf students. Salem, a senior political science major, said he now fears that his criticism has fallen on deaf ears. At his orientation, Salem said he had no interpreter. Throughout his time here at UCF, he said he has found the school isn’t accommodating for him and his fellow deaf students outside of helping in the case of academic purposes. / Central Florida Future

Terre Haute, IN
BLUMBERG CENTER RECEIVES MULTI-YEAR GRANT TO PROVIDE SERVICES, SUPPORT FOR DEAF-BLIND INDIANA YOUTH
An Indiana State University resource center has received a five-year grant to continue providing services to caregivers of young Hoosiers who have both vision and hearing impairments. The Blumberg Center for Interdisciplinary Studies in Special Education received new grant funding for the Indiana Deaf-Blind Services Project. The $1 million, five-year grant program extension will allow the center to continue providing resources, services and training to educators and family members of children and young adults who have combined hearing and vision impairments. / ISU Newsroom

Washington, DC
GALLAUDET UNIVERSITY POLICE BOOT MAN SEEKING 100 UNDERAGE GIRLS FOR MARRIAGE, SEX
Gallaudet University has removed from campus a man seeking 100 underage girls to marry and to make his concubines, officials said. “Last week, a man carrying the same letter was seen on the Gallaudet University campus and was subsequently asked to leave and prohibited from returning,” said Theodore Baran, Director of Gallaudet University Department of Public Safety, in a released statement. The man has no known connection to the university, he said. / D.C. Crime Stories

Lancaster, PA
DEAF ADVOCATE APPLAUDS LANCASTER COUNTY TEXT-TO-911 SERVICE
Advocates for the deaf and speech impaired are applauding a new service that could help save lives in Lancaster County. Verizon wireless customers are now able to text 911, if they’re unable to call. Christine Roy is a case manager for Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Services of Lancaster County. She herself is also deaf, so when she learned that Lancaster County 911 and Verizon were collaborating on a text-to-911 system, she was thrilled. / WPMT

Internet
QUESTIONS EMERGE ABOUT DEAF NEWS TODAY AND ITS OWNER
During the 2013 Deaflympics held in Sofia, Bulgaria, last July, the USA Deaf Sports Federation began receiving reports alleging Deaf News Today was plagiarizing articles, photographs and tweets from the USADSF media team. The team, comprised of volunteer writers, editors, photographers and videographers, posted materials on Facebook, Twitter, and the USADSF website. DNT initially reposted the materials, but didn’t directly link to the USADSF website. Rather, DNT pointed all visitors to its own website. / Trudy Suggs


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INTERNATIONAL
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London, England
MAYOR BORIS LIFTS BAN ON DEAF CHOIR SINGING AT TRAFALGAR SQUARE CAROLS
“Scrooge” bureaucrats banned a deaf choir from performing at the annual Trafalgar Square carol service because their song choices aren’t “traditional enough.” The National Deaf Children’s Society choir – made up of adults who work for the society – say they and the children had been rehearsing for weeks, and were “incredibly disappointed” by the last-minute decision by the Greater London Authority. But after the Tribune contacted the GLA, Mayor of London Boris Johnson intervened to reinstate the choir on the program. / Islington Tribune

London, England
DEAF ASSOCIATION EXPRESSES 'OUTRAGE' OVER BBC'S HOLBY CITY EPISODE
Following this week’s episode of Holby City, which showed a Deaf man’s daughter acting as his interpreter while he was seriously ill in hospital, Jenny Hopkins, who is the Chief Executive of Gloucestershire Deaf Association, has written a formal letter of complaint to the BBC expressing her “outrage” over the storyline, which she says will do “damage” to the understanding of Deafness among viewers and medical staff. / The Limping Chicken

London, England
MY WEEK: WENDY WESTGARTH HELPS THE PARENTS OF DEAF CHILDREN
The family officer for the north east at the National Deaf Children's Society recounts her week. Monday: I've just got back from a long weekend break in the Highlands of Scotland, so it takes me a few minutes to readjust to being at work. Tuesday: I'm off to meet the parents of a three-month old deaf girl who contacted our helpline. / Third Sector

London, England
INDUSTRIAL DEAFNESS: THE NEW WHIPLASH?
With the government’s bold promises on whiplash reform threatening to close the door on fraudsters, motor insurers can look to the future with cautious optimism. But with the whiplash consultation and the introduction of fixed costs as part of the Jackson reforms making the pursuit of such claims less appealing, the threat of claims migration to less well-protected areas – particularly the lucrative area of noise-induced hearing loss – is becoming increasingly prevalent. / Post Online

London, England
BEN COHEN ADMITS HEARING LOSS IS HARD TO COPE WITH ON 'STRICTLY COME DANCING'
Strictly hunk Ben Cohen has admitted he is finding his hearing loss hard to cope with on the BBC One dance show. The former Saints star suffers with 50% hearing loss, as well as tinnitus, but he has insisted he is not letting it affect him. He said: “It is very hard, but I’ve never let it affect me at all. “I’ve played my whole rugby career with it so you know, it’s just one of those things. / Herald & Post

Jerusalem, Israel
VIDEO: MK'S 'SING' IN SIGN LANGUAGE
A video has surfaced of MKs "singing" in sign language, in a project in solidarity with Israeli organizations for the deaf and hard of hearing. A day of solidarity with organizations that advocate for the deaf will take place in the Knesset Tuesday to mark 20 years since the establishment of the Institute for the Advancement of the Deaf. / Arutz Sheva

Oaxaca, Mexico
DEAF POLICE OFFICERS HELP MONITOR OAXACA CITY STREETS
Members of the newest police force in the colonial city of Oaxaca can't hear or speak. A group called the Angels of Silence operates the city's surveillance cameras to look for crimes being committed on its streets. Cynthia Zepeda, director of Oaxaca state's emergency services, said the officers have a highly developed visual sense and are not easily distracted. "They read lips and can perceive suspicious movements in people," Zepeda said. / The Associated Press

Lagos, Nigeria
PERSONS LIVING WITH HEARING IMPAIRMENTS URGED TO BE INDEPENDENT
The Deputy Governor of Lagos State, Mrs Adejoke Orelope-Adefulire has called on the deaf and persons living with hearing impairments to be socially and economically independent. Orelope-Adefulire made this call at the 2nd Local Government Deaf Awareness Program in Lagos themed "Empowering The Hearing Impaired (Deaf) For National Building In The 21st Century Viz Economic Development At The Local Level." / Daily Times Nigeria


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LIFE & LEISURE
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Salem, OR
DEAF STUDENTS 'RAIN' GLOBES TO DECORATE TREE IN NATION'S CAPITAL
Oregon School for the Deaf students have designed and created ornaments for Oregon’s tree for the 2013 National Christmas Tree display, the National Park Foundation announced Tuesday. The National Park Foundation, a group that supports America’s national parks, provides plastic globes for students to fill. Two School for the Deaf students, Carina Dominguez and Jessie Simon, designed this year’s ornaments. The theme is “rain,” in celebration of Oregon’s lush environment. / Statesman Journal

Frederick MD
GIVE DEAF CHILDREN A CHOICE
When I was 14, my mother received a letter from her health insurance company to inform her that cochlear implants were now a covered service. Included with the letter was a glossy brochure from the Johns Hopkins Listening Center. On the front of it was the photograph of a gleeful little girl who had a small wire leading from the side of her head to an electronic device hanging around her neck that looked like a “bionic” necklace of sorts. I have profound bilateral deafness, so my mother and grandmother (who both love me very much) were thrilled at the prospect that I might finally be able to hear and therefore be able to live a “normal” life. / The Frederick News-Post

King City, MO
DEAF STUDENT INSPIRES CLASSMATES, TEACHERS
Kaylee Wells sits in her fifth-grade class like the rest of her classmates, gets called on like everyone else and works in groups. She may be similar in those aspects, but there's still something a little different; She is the only deaf student at her entire school. "Sometimes it's sad because we had another deaf student, but he moved. And now, sometimes I feel lonely," Kaylee Wells said. That doesn't stop the 11-year-old from learning and participating in activities at King City Elementary. / stjoechannel.com

Big Spring, TX
WEST TEXAS DEAF CHURCH HAS WORLDWIDE MINISTRY
Blessed Hands Baptist Deaf Church hopes not only to minister to the nonhearing population of Big Spring but to reach the world. Big Spring is home to the Southwest Collegiate Institute for the Deaf—believed to be the world’s only two-year college for the deaf. “So, people from all over the world come here to Big Spring,” said Mark Lindsey, pastor of First Baptist Church in Big Spring. / Baptist Standard

Logandale, NV
HEARING LOSS AND DIABETES
Diabetes and hearing loss are two of America’s most widespread health concerns. Nearly 26 million people in the U.S. have diabetes, and an estimated 34.5 million have some type of hearing loss. Those are large groups of people, and it appears there is a lot of overlap between the two. A recent study found that hearing loss is twice as common in people with diabetes as it is in those who don’t have the disease. Also, of the 79 million adults in the U.S. who have prediabetes, the rate of hearing loss is 30 percent higher than in those with normal blood glucose. / Moapa Valley Progress

Internet
SIGN LANGUAGE RING TRANSLATES GESTURES, VOICE TO AUDIO AND TEXT
There's probably nothing more frustrating than the experience of trying to communicate with someone who doesn't speak your language. For the hearing impaired, that's undoubtedly something of a daily reality, since most people do not know sign language. Those days of fruitless gesturing might just be over with the introduction of the Sign Language Ring, a wearable translating device that detects motion and gestures, and translates them into words, which are then emitted through voice by the bracelet. / DVICE


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WORKING WORLD
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New York, NY
JACKIE ROTH, DEAF SINCE BIRTH, IS AN ADVOCATE AND A BROKER FOR THE DISABLED
When clients hear broker Jackie Roth speak, they assume — correctly — that English is her second language. Some presume — incorrectly — that she’s from France. “People ask where I’m from, and I say, ‘Brooklyn,’ ” and they say, ‘No, no, where are you from originally,’ and I say, ‘BROOKLYN,’ ” says Roth with a smile. The star Douglas Elliman broker first communicated in sign language, and didn’t speak English until she was 5. Deaf since birth, Roth is a rarity in New York’s real-estate world: a broker with a disability. / NY Daily News

Orem, UT
UVU PROFESSOR LEADS EFFORT TO BUILD ONLINE DEAF WORLD LIBRARY AND MUSEUM
Each semester, Utah Valley University professor and Director of American Sign Language & Deaf Studies Bryan Eldredge assigns his students projects that require extensive research of historical documents regarding the cultures of deaf people. There’s just one problem: “Today, the vast majority of the nation’s deaf resources are only available to those who can physically visit the libraries where they exist,” Eldredge said. But a $50,000 grant awarded to Eldredge in September might change all that. / Utah Valley University

New York, NY
BUS DRIVER LEARNING ASL TO BETTER SERVE DEAF RIDERS
Bus driver Edwin Cora welcomes riders with simple greetings. “How are you feeling today?” he asks a female rider in Queens. “How are you doing, brother?” he says to a young man who boards next. Occasionally, however, the veteran bus driver talks with his hands. Cora, for example, might make two fists, press both sets of door-knock knuckles together, rotate them slightly in opposite directions, and then extend his right pointer finger forward at a rider — American Sign Language for “How are you?” / NY Daily News

Nacogdoches, TX
DEAF ED PROGRAM RECEIVES HIGH RATINGS IN REVIEW
The Nacogdoches ISD day school that supports hearing impaired children and their families received high marks in a recent statewide Peer Review process. “I was very pleased with the results of our review,” said Nacogdoches ISD RDSPD supervisor Kayla Hughes. Five teachers, seven paraprofessionals, a secretary and Hughes form the Nacogdoches Regional Day School Program for the Deaf. They work with children from birth to 12th grade in Nacogdoches and six nearby counties. / KETK


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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT
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Frankfort, KY
WOMAN WITH HEARING LOSS FEELS LIKE A TARGET AFTER THEATER COMPLAINT
There’s a witch-hunt taking place in Frankfort, but it has nothing to do with Halloween festivities. Anita Dowd — a woman with profound hearing loss who filed a complaint against Chakeres Theatres Inc. and received a $5,000 settlement — said she feels as if she has a target on her back. Dowd filed the complaint in July 2011, alleging the Frankfort movie theater failed to provide her with auxiliary aids or captioning services. The Human Rights Commission ruled there was probable cause that discrimination occurred, and the company agreed to compensate Dowd, although it maintains it did not violate any civil rights law. / The State Journal

Los Angeles, CA
STEPHANIE NOGUERAS: 'THERE'S NOTHING IN MY LIFE THAT WOULD LIMIT MY ABILITY TO SUCCEED'
When Stephanie Nogueras was asked to scream at a recent audition, there was just one thing that had her worried – she has never heard what her scream sounds like! "The audition called for me to scream aloud and act out being aggressively captured," Nogueras, 23, tells PEOPLE of being cast on the supernatural drama Grimm. "As a deaf person it was a first for me to have to use my voice. I don't know what it sounded like but it landed me the role." / PEOPLE

Livonia, MI
HUMORIST TELLS PERSONAL STORIES THROUGH SIGN LANGUAGE
Liysa Callsen will let her hands do the talking when she performs stories from her memoir, Tell ‘em, next week in Livonia. “Eighty percent of it is signed by me and voiced by an interpreter. Sign language is my first language. It’s a beautiful language,” said Callsen, in a recent phone interview from her home in Manitowoc, Wisc. The former Livonia resident will stage her stories about life with deaf parents and a deaf husband on Nov. 27 at the Detroit Marriott Livonia. / Observer & Eccentric

New York, NY
NEW YORK DEAF THEATRE SIGNS 'THE 39 STEPS'
The 39 Steps is back in New York for a limited run at the TADA! Theatre, presented in a unique staging by New York Deaf Theatre. Although it was clear at the performance I attended that the deaf audience members found great enjoyment in the proceedings, the comedy is diminished for the hearing audience due to the silence in the room. Laughter is infectious and with only a little chuckle from the audience here and there, it is difficult for the collective experience to reach anything close to the laugh-riot that occurred on Broadway. / Examiner.com

Corvallis, OR
ONE-ACT IRISH COMEDY INTERPRETED IN SIGN LANGUAGE OPENS AT OSU DEC. 5
“The King of Spain’s Daughter,” a one-act comedy by Irish playwright Teresa Deevy, will be presented at 7:30 p.m. Dec. 5-7 in the Lab Theatre in Withycombe Hall at Oregon State University. For every speaking actor in the production, there will be an interpreting actor using American Sign Language. OSU faculty member Charlotte Headrick said this is the first time a production at Oregon State will be “shadowed” by interpreters using ASL. / Albany Tribune

St. Louis, MO
SLIFF: 'LAKE WINDFALL'
Missouri-shot “Lake Windfall” takes an authentic look at different hearing-loss experiences. The film persuasively demonstrates how critical effective communication is to our collective survival. The director of the film, Roger Vass, Jr., and writer/producer Tony Nitko spoke with Christine Buck about the movie. / kplr11.com


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SPORTS
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Washington, DC
GALLAUDET BISON TO MAKE HISTORIC PLAYOFF APPEARANCE
For the first time in its school history the Gallaudet Bison will make a post season appearance in the NCAA Division 3 football playoffs. At a watch party on Sunday night it was announced that the Bison, who are ranked #25, will face #7 Hobart College on the road in Geneva, N.Y. on Saturday November 23 at noon. Nick Elstad, a safety and senior said, "We've come a long way from four years ago to this point." / wusa9.com

See Also GALLAUDET'S TAALAT HOPEFUL STORYBOOK JOURNEY LEADS HIM TO NFL / CBSSports.com

Fontana, CA
DEAF STUDENT IS A STANDOUT FOOTBALL PLAYER FOR MILLER
Deafness and hard of hearing, by definition, are disabilities that according to the World Health Organization affect about 360 million people worldwide. But for one Fontana student, being deaf has not stopped him from achieving success. Meet Simione Aluesi, a 6-foot-1, 260-pound football player who has overcome the disability to become one of the standout performers on the Fontana A.B. Miller High School team. Aluesi, who lost all hearing in his left ear and 50 percent in his right one as a child, began playing football almost five years ago, and since then he has achieved much recognition. / Fontana Herald News

Atlanta, GA
DEAF HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL PLAYER EXCELS ON THE FIELD
Clarke Central High School football player T.J. Ellison hasn't let life's challenges keep him from fulfilling his dreams. Ellison was born deaf, and he hopes to show others they can do anything they put their minds to, regardless of setbacks. Both on and off the field, Ellison is just like any other player. He just communicates a little differently. "My defensive coaches always have hand signals, so that's how I get my signals on the field," said Ellison, who is a defensive lineman. / MyFox Atlanta

Macon, GA
JOHN MILLEDGE RALLIES AROUND DEAF ATHLETE
Football is not an easy sport to digest on the field. Quarterbacks can yell an audible when they see a defense shift. Coaches scream on the sidelines to make minor adjustments, and even the crack of a good hit can motivate a team for the next play. One John Milledge Academy athlete has had to develop a system to read everything that everyone else can easily take in. And as the Trojans look for another deep run in the playoffs, their commitment to one another, even players with physical challenges is bringing them all together. / 13WMAZ

Haughton, LA
HEARING IMPAIRED HAUGHTON STUDENT OVERCOMES THE ODDS
Being hearing impaired and a part of the high school band isn't an easy combination, but one Ark-La-Tex student is working hard to beat the odds. Two years ago, 17-year-old Kelsy Baker, took a big chance, she tried out for Haughton High School's flag line. "I was actually really scared of trying out, but I did," said Baker. Mostly deaf in both ears, she knew it would be a challenge to join an activity that largely depends on hearing the beat of the music. But she didn't let her disability stop her. / KSLA News 12

Batavia, NY
SCRIMMAGE AT NOTRE DAME GIVES HEARING AND DEAF TEAMS A CHANCE TO LEARN FROM EACH OTHER
In the late 1960s, when David Pero played boys basketball for Notre Dame, one of the schools annual opponents that always presented a challenge was St. Mary's School for the Deaf out of Buffalo. The boys played hard and and ran their plays with no verbal communication. It was quite an experience, as Pero remembered it. As the girls basketball coach at Notre Dame, Pero thought his team should share the same experience.
/ The Batavian

Lakewood, TX
DEAF JV CHEERLEADER USES COUNTING, MEMORY DURING ROUTINES
Woodrow Wilson’s district winning football team has some great athletes, but at Woodrow, the athleticism does not stop at the sidelines. In the busy space between the football players and the spectators, the cheerleaders show an athletic prowess, commitment, and synchronization that any coach would be fortunate to have. Alessa Johnson is one such athlete. She is a competitive cheerleader at Woodrow Wilson who faces more challenges than the average teenage girl, but shines and perseveres nonetheless. / Advocate


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EMPLOYMENT
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You can advertise your job openings here for just $20 a week (up to 100 words, 10 cents each add'l word). To place your ad, send the announcement to mail@deafweekly.com.

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FACULTY POSITION OPENING
CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, NORTHRIDGE

Northridge, California 91330

Department: Deaf Studies

Effective Date of Appointment: August 2014
(Subject to Budgetary Approval)

Rank: Assistant/Associate Professor

Salary: Dependent on Qualifications

Qualifications: Earned Doctorate in Deaf Studies, Linguistics, American Sign Language (ASL), or closely related field of study. ABD candidates will be considered but must complete the doctorate by the time of appointment. General knowledge of ASL and the Deaf Studies field, which may include but is not limited to ASL teaching, cultural studies, Deaf Education, and interpreting. Possess strong and effective teaching methods in various aspects of ASL and Deaf Studies or other related courses. Extensive knowledge of Deaf Culture and the Deaf community. Evidence of successful Deaf Studies-related teaching experience at the college level. Demonstrated evidence of recent scholarly publications or equivalencies and activities or evidence of potential for such scholarly accomplishments. Ability to interact effectively with both Deaf and hearing people. Evidence of positive relationships and collegiality with university students, staff, and colleagues. Evidence of participation in ASL/Deaf Studies and Deaf community organizations on local, state, and/or national levels. Commitment to Deaf bilingual/bicultural experience and its foundation in basic human rights. Native/native-like fluency in ASL. Basic understanding of curriculum development. Demonstrated commitment to teaching and mentoring a diverse student population.

CSUN is a Learning Centered University. The successful candidate will be expected to join faculty and staff in a commitment to active learning, to the assessment of learning outcomes, and to multiple pathways that enable students to graduate.

At time of appointment, the successful candidate, if not a U.S. citizen, must have authorization from the Bureau of Citizenship and Immigration Services to work in the United States.

Evidence of degree(s) required at time of hire.

Responsibilities: Teach American Sign Language and Deaf Studies content courses. The standard teaching load is twelve (12) units per semester (plus committee assignments). A reduced load will be assigned during the first year of teaching. The successful candidate will be expected to contribute to and participate in the life and development of the department (including curriculum and program development); engage in scholarship and community service and to remain current in their field; serve on departmental, college, and/or university committees, and to participate in other service as needed.

Application Process: Applicants should submit all of the following:
NOTE: Incomplete applications will be accepted but will not be reviewed/considered until all requested materials are received.

1. Cover letter that includes:
-- Statements of teaching and research interests
-- Summary of prior relevant experience
-- Statement or evidence of Deaf-centric philosophies

2. Current curriculum vitae that includes:
-- Educational background
-- Prior teaching experience
-- Evidence of scholarship and/or related professional experience

3. One sample course syllabus from a course in a related field of study

4. One automated student evaluation. If none are available, provide a written statement confirming that automated evaluations are not available and provide some other evidence of teaching effectiveness/potential.

5. Photocopies of all earned degrees (BA, MA, Ph.D.)

6. Provide evidence of any relevant certificates

7. Three (3) current letters of recommendation (not more than two years old)

8. Names and complete contact information for at least three (3) professional references

Application Deadline:
Screening of candidates will begin on January 21, 2014. Position to remain open until filled.

Inquiries and nominations should be addressed to:

Flavia S. Fleischer, Chair
Department of Deaf Studies
California State University, Northridge
18111 Nordhoff Street
Northridge, California 91330-8265

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ASSISTANT LECTURER - AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE #0349
Department: Communication Disorders College of Health Sciences

The Division of Communication Disorders at the University of Wyoming is seeking an Assistant Lecturer in American Sign Language (ASL) for a 9-month position at 0.75 FTE. Opportunities for summer teaching are available. The position is reviewed annually.

Primary responsibilities are teaching beginning and intermediate ASL classes. More advanced and deaf culture classes may also be included. Minimum qualifications are a bachelor’s degree, fluency in ASL, and skills for effective communication and collaboration. Preferred qualifications include certification as an ASL instructor or interpreter, experience in teaching or interpreting ASL, knowledge of deaf culture, a master’s degree in a related field, or general teaching experience.

The Division of Communication Disorders offers an undergraduate degree in speech-language-hearing sciences and a CAA-accredited graduate program in speech-language pathology. ASL coursework is required for the speech-language-hearing sciences degree and is accepted as foreign language for students in other majors.

The University's policy has been, and will continue to be, one of nondiscrimination, offering equal opportunity to all employees and applicants for employment on the basis of their demonstrated ability and competence without regard to such matters as race, sex, gender, color, religion, national origin, disability, age, veteran status, sexual orientation, genetic information, political belief, or other status protected by state and federal statutes or University Regulations.

The University of Wyoming is committed to providing a safe and productive learning and living community. To achieve that goal, we conduct background investigations for all final candidates being considered for employment. Background checks may include, but are not limited to, criminal history, national sex offender search, employment and motor vehicle history. Offers of employment are contingent upon the completion of the background check.

Send a letter of application outlining expertise, a resume, official transcripts and certification documents, and three letters of recommendation to: Michael Primus, Ph.D., Search Committee Chair, Division of Communication Disorders, University of Wyoming, Department 3311, 1000 E. University Avenue, Laramie, WY 82071. For more information, contact Dr. Primus at (307) 766-5795 or mprimus@uwyo.edu. Review of applicants will begin December 3, 2013 and continue until the position is filled. Anticipated start date: 1/13/2014.

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TEACHERS (Blind/Deaf)

The Georgia School for the Deaf located in Cave Springs, Georgia (Floyd County) is searching for applicants who meet the “Highly Qualified” provision of the federal No Child Left Behind Act. These are 10-month (200 day) school positions, paid over 12 months. Instructional planning; provides individual differentiated instruction; assesses and analyzes student progress, creates and maintains a positive and academically challenging bilingual learning environment; and performs other duties as assigned. For additional information, qualifications and to download a State of Georgia Application of Employment (required) click on the Employment link at www.gsdweb.org. Applications can be: mailed: The Georgia School for the Deaf, Personnel Office-Gail Blankenship, 232 Perry Farm Road SW, Cave Spring, GA 30124; faxed: 706-777-2240 or emailed: gail.blankenship@doe.k12.ga.us.

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PAHrtners Deaf Services is Expanding to Pittsburgh

www.pahrtners.com/careers

www.facebook.com/deafjobs

NEW CAREER OPPORTUNITIES IN PITTSBURGH AND GLENSIDE

PAHrtners Deaf Services is a dynamic team of behavioral health professionals serving Deaf and Hard of Hearing children and adults. Located outside of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, PAHrtners provides residential and out-patient services to Deaf and Hard of Hearing (HoH) children, adolescents and adults. Over 85% of our staff members are Deaf or Hard of Hearing!

As a result of our commitment to the Deaf/HoH community PAHrtners is rapidly growing and expanding. Whether you are a high school graduate, recent college graduate or professional with many years of experience in the field of human services, we have a career-building position waiting for you! E.O.E.

PAHrtners is looking for dedicated, motivated, energetic individuals who are fluent in American Sign Language and knowledgeable in Deaf culture to fill the following positions:

-- ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT – Full Time; Glenside location
-- STAFF INTERPRETER – Full Time or Part Time; Glenside location
-- RESIDENTIAL PROGRAM DIRECTOR – Full Time; Glenside location
-- RESIDENTIAL CASE MANAGER – Full Time; Pittsburgh location
-- RESIDENTIAL COUNSELORS – Full Time, Part Time, On Call; Glenside and Pittsburgh locations
-- OFFICE MANAGER/INTERPRETER – Full Time; Pittsburgh location

Go to our Website at: www.PAHrtners.com to learn more about each position.
Like us on Facebook at: www.facebook.com/deafjobs

Send your letter of intent and resume to:

Linda Claypool, Office Manager/HR
PAHrtners Deaf Services
614 N. Easton Road
Glenside, PA 19038

Email: lclaypool@pahrtners.com
Fax: 215-884-6301; 215-884-9770 TTY/V

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