deafweekly

 

October 30, 2013
Vol. 10, No. 2

Editor: Tom Willard

Deafweekly is an independent news report for the deaf and hard-of-hearing community that is mailed to subscribers on Wednesdays and available to read at www.deafweekly.com. These are the actual headlines and portions of recent deaf-related news articles, with links to the full story. Minor editing is done when necessary. Deafweekly is copyrighted 2013 and any unauthorized use is prohibited.

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NATIONAL
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Ellicott City, MD
JUDGE IN DEAF ABUSE CASE FORBIDS FACIAL GESTURES, SIGN LANGUAGE IN COURTROOM
The judge in the Maryland School for the Deaf sexual abuse case implemented an uncommon rule in the courtroom Tuesday. After the jury was finalized and prior to opening statements, Judge William V. Tucker forbade any sign language communication by people in the courtroom, either between spectators or between spectators and trial participants. The only exception was for the four official courtroom interpreters and those communicating to the interpreters. Directed specifically at members of the audience, he also said "facial gestures to any witnesses or participants" were forbidden during the trial, threatening to remove anyone who violated the temporary rule. / Capital News Service

See Also PROSECUTOR: MD. DEAF SCHOOL AIDE WAS WARNED ABOUT EXCESS TOUCHING; DEFENSE: IT WAS INNOCENT / The Associated Press

Washington, DC
TOYS R US SETTLES CHARGES OF DISCRIMINATION AGAINST DEAF APPLICANT
The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission has reached a $35,000 settlement with Toys R Us Inc. in a case in which the retailer was charged with refusing to hire a qualified deaf job applicant. In a lawsuit filed in March, the EEOC said Shakirra Thomas had applied for a team member position at the retailer's Columbia, Md. store in October 2011. According to the EEOC, when Toys R Us contacted Ms. Thomas to invite her to a group interview, her mother advised the company that Ms. Thomas was deaf and requested an interpreter for the interview. The company refused, saying she would have to provide her own interpreter. / Business Insurance

Tucson, AZ
ASDB SUPERINTENDENT PLACED ON ADMINISTRATIVE LEAVE
The Arizona State Schools for the Deaf and the Blind Governing Board placed Superintendent Robert Hill? on administrative leave Thursday ?. The board made the decision after reviewing a report detailing complaints filed by four employees filed against Hill earlier this year, which led to an investigation of the ?superintendent. The board also approved releasing the report to the public? and working with attorneys on creating a notice of allegations and notice of possible employment action against Hill. / Arizona Daily Star

Huntsville, AL
HEARING-IMPAIRED COUPLE PROTESTS LACK OF INTERPRETER OR TRIAL, DA SAYS THEY FOLLOWED COUPLE'S WISHES
A hearing-impaired Toney man and his deaf wife protested outside the Madison County Courthouse Monday morning, alleging unfair treatment and a violation of the Americans with Disabilities Act, during a misdemeanor criminal trial held Oct. 17. Donald Boilard and his wife, Ruth Boilard, had several signs complaining about discrimination and mishandling of the case. But Madison County District Attorney Rob Broussard said, "We had met with him and gave him the option of delaying the trial to secure an interpreter or go forward with him interpreting for his wife. He chose to go forward, the judgment went against him and now he's unhappy." / The Huntsville Times

Philadelphia, PA
EFFORT UNDERWAY TO BUILD BRIDGE BETWEEN POLICE & DEAF, HARD OF HEARING
The Philadelphia Police Advisory Commission is taking steps to open the lines of communication between cops and those who are deaf and hard of hearing. Imagine getting stopped by police. The officer shines a flashlight in your eyes. They knock on your window. The only problem is you cannot hear. “If you are a deaf person you are very blinded by that and it becomes very distressing,” says Neil McDevitt, executive director of the Deaf-Hearing Communications Centre in Swarthmore, Pa. / CBS Philly

Washington, DC
APP TO ASSIST DEAF MOBILE-PHONE USERS HITS FCC ROADBLOCK
It has been nearly two years since Miracom sought Federal Communications Commission approval for an app designed to help the deaf use mobile phones. The app, known as InnoCaption, allows deaf users to “hear” a person talking on the end of a call with the help of a stenographer who transcribes the conversation. But Miracom needs FCC approval to gain access to a government fund that would allow deaf customers to use the app for free. The FCC, troubled that the $700 million fund has become riddled with fraud, is refusing to grant any new companies access to the fund. / The Washington Post

San Diego, CA
AT DUNKIN DONUTS, GOING DEAF COULD GET YOU FIRED
July 22nd was supposed to be one of the happiest days of Stephanie Stratford’s life, her wedding day. That feeling of wonderfully wedded bliss was short lived for her. Two days later, Stratford‘s world was turned upside down due to an unforeseeable medical anomaly, Stephanie suffered a complete hearing loss and then was fired for that loss of hearing. Stephanie worked as a regional manager at a local Dunkin Donuts franchise. / Liberal America

Faribault, MN
MSAD REVAMPS KITCHEN BUT STRUGGLES WITH NEW FOOD RESTRICTIONS
After much collaboration with state legislators, Minnesota State Academy for the Deaf was able to acquire $85,000 for new kitchen equipment, but these renovations will do little to satisfy hungry kids and concerned parents. With old, out-of-date equipment in continual need of repair, the school knew something needed to be done. Thanks to the additional money from the state, MSAD installed brand new ovens and a dishwasher last week. The new USDA food regulations are another story. / Faribault Daily News

Reading, PA
PARENTS RENEW COMPLAINTS ABOUT SERVICES FOR HEARING-IMPAIRED CHILDREN
Parents returned to the Hamburg School Board with complaints about the district's services for children with hearing impairments, and administrators are standing by their choice. Annette Brewer and Tracy Smith, mothers of Tharon Brewer, 15, and Nicholas Smith, 14, addressed the school board with complaints about their children's interpreters. The complaints stem from when the district decided to switch interpreting-service providers before the school year began. Brewer said that the inconsistency in interpreters has hurt her son's grades. Brewer requested the board select a new provider that will pair her son with a single interpreter. / The Reading Eagle

Charlotte, NC
SENATOR, LOCAL NON-PROFIT ADVOCATE FOR HEARING-IMPAIRED KIDS
Mecklenburg County is among the worst in the state when it comes to treating hearing-impaired kids. So, a local non-profit that works with these kids is teaming-up with a senator to help get the word out. Valerie and Dominic Roberti knew something wasn't quite right with their daughter Violet, but they weren't sure exactly what was going on. Turns out she is hearing impaired in both ears. But they didn't catch it until she was 2-years-old. Shannon Tucker, the executive director at non-profit Charlotte speech and hearing center, says they see this all too often. / WCNC

Cambria County, PA
POLICE RESCUE HEARING-IMPAIRED MAN FROM BURNING HOME
Local police rescued a disabled man from an early morning house fire in Cambria County on Monday. The fire broke out around 5 a.m. Police and neighbors said the man who lives there alone, Joe Varmecky, is hearing impaired. Police said they had to kick in a rear door of the home to reach him and, once inside, they found him in the living room. Officials helped Varmecky get out of the house and one police officer had to write Varmecky a note telling him he wouldn't be allowed back in because of extensive damage. / WJACTV.com


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London, England
DEAF AND BLIND MAN FEARS LOSING HOME OVER 'BEDROOM TAX' AS DISABLED LEGAL CHALLENGES MOUNT
A deaf and blind man who uses his spare bedroom to store braille equipment fears that he could lose his home due to the “bedroom tax” as lawyers warned that the controversial measure is having a discriminatory impact on the disabled. Iain Duncan Smith, the Work and Pensions Secretary, is facing mounting legal challenges from organisations representing disabled tenants affected by the tax, which argue that it has a disproportionate impact on the most vulnerable, and may breach human rights. / The Independent

London, England
BIG BROTHER WINNER SAM EVANS DONATES £3,000 OF PRIZE MONEY TO DEAF CHARITY
Big Brother winner Sam Evans has donated £3,000 ($4,800 US) of his prize money to a deaf charity. The 23-year-old, who won £100,000 ($160,000 US) after coming first on the reality series this year, presented the check to Action on Hearing Loss. Evans, who was born with 70% to 80% hearing loss, joined the charity's CEO and hundreds of others to trek up London's BT Tower to raise funds. / Digital Spy

London, England
SIGNED CLIPS CREATED TO MAKE ATHLETICS MORE ACCESSIBLE FOR DEAF PARTICIPANTS
Video clips to help athletics coaches and leaders learn basic sport-related British Sign Language to support young people with hearing loss have been launched this week. The clips, created by the National Deaf Children’s Society in partnership with several of the UK’s leading sports organizations, feature key sport words and phrases. There are 32 short clips for athletics, with videos for other popular sporting activities also available. / Athletics Weekly

Cambridge, England
RESEARCHERS DISCOVER HOW TO 'RUB OUT' BACKGROUND NOISE ON HEARING AIDS
Researchers at Cambridge University’s engineering department are developing a device which could rid hearing aid wearers of annoying background noise. Led by Dr Richard Turner, the research could forever remove sounds such as wind, traffic and talking, which affect people’s aids. Dr Turner said: “The poor performance of current hearing devices in noise is a major reason why six million people in the UK who would benefit from a hearing aid do not use them.” / Cambridge Univ. News

Blackburn, England
BLACKBURN DEAF MAN FIRED UP OVER ALARM
A deaf man is asking for further changes to his home because his smoke alarms keep going off, leading to repeated visits from the fire service. Ken Jarvis, 75, said fire crews were regularly called to his house because he inadvertently sets off the alarms when he cooks. He has asked to have a fan installed above his cooker and flashing lights in his hall to alert him to the alarm. / Lancashire Telegraph

Sydney, Australia
NEW TECHNOLOGY ALLOWS PHONE CONVERSATIONS FOR DEAF AND HARD OF HEARING
The National Relay Service has launched new technology which will allow Australians who are deaf or hard of hearing to have near real-time phone conversations. As of Oct. 28, Australians who are deaf or hard of hearing, will now be able to speak directly to another person using a landline or mobile and have the responses captioned by a relay operator using voice recognition software. / ARNnet

Victoria, Australia
DEAF STUDENTS BREAK LANGUAGE BARRIERS
When Heidi Beasley-Ellich sits her written VCE exams this month, she will read the questions in English and write her answers in English, too. This would not pose a problem were it not for the fact English is not Heidi's first language, because she is profoundly deaf. Heidi attends Forest Hill College in Burwood East. Facility manager Amanda Purcell believes passionately in the learning system but not the rigid form of assessment that puts Heidi and others at a major disadvantage. ''It defeats the purpose of allowing them to learn the subject in their first language if you're going to assess them in their second language,'' Ms Purcell said. / The Age

Queensland, Australia
DEAF SPRINTER SEKOU KANNEH, 13, BREAKS 21-YEAR-OLD RECORD
Sekou Kanneh never heard the crack of the starting pistol on his way to breaking a 21-year-old record at the Queensland Secondary Schools State Championships. In a world first, the 13-year-old deaf sprinter’s scorching 100m at the Queensland Sport and Athletics Centre was released by the flash of a hi-tech starting system that frees him to compete against, and beat, able-bodied athletes. / The Australian

Beit El, Israel
SOLDIERS PERFORM ANTHEM IN SIGN LANGUAGE
New recruits to the Israel Defense Forces who are hard of hearing taught their peers how to sing the Israeli national anthem, Hatikva, in sign language. They performed it at their swearing-in ceremony, surprising their parents and friends and moving many of them to tears, reported the IDF blog. The ceremony marked the end of a special basic training course for soldiers who volunteered for IDF service despite disabilities that made it possible for them to opt out of military service, had they chosen to. / Israel National News

Manila, Philippines
DEAF STUDENT GRADUATES MAGNA CUM LAUDE
Michael Lopez, a 19-year-old deaf student who graduated magna cum laude from the De La Salle-College of Saint Benilde, says he wants to inspire other persons with disabilities to go after their dreams. Lopez, who finished a Bachelor in Applied Deaf Studies degree, lost his hearing when he was three years old. He had gotten sick and complications caused him to go deaf. Luckily, this didn’t deter him from doing well in school. / Yahoo! Philippines News

Johannesburg, South Africa
NEW CURRICULUM FOR DEAF PUPILS ON THE CARDS
Only 10 percent of deaf children start their schooling equipped with the skill to communicate in the South African Sign Language (SASL). The other 90 percent, who are born into families that can hear, enter the educational system without any formal knowledge of a language – spoken or signed – or a means to communicate and be understood by those outside their family. A draft policy the Department of Basic Education recently released for public comments is intent on changing this. / IOL.co.za

Chennai, India
HEARING-IMPAIRED CAN NOW JOIN UNIVERSITY SENATE
The University of Madras has amended its statute, enabling participation of the hearing-impaired in the elections to the Senate and Syndicate of the historic 155-year-old varsity. The law in question was amended and ratified at the university’s Senate meeting held on Saturday. The existing provision proscribes those of unsound mind, the hearing-impaired and those suffering from leprosy from elections to these bodies. Changing the rule was on the advice of the Higher Education Department. / The New Indian Express

Lahore, Pakistan
RS500,000 AWARDED TO DEAF POSITION HOLDER
Lahore Transport Company (LTC) chairman Khawaja Ahmad Hassaan gave a cheque of Rs500,000 ($4,700 US) to Syed Ali Haider as financial assistance for achieving first position among deaf children in the matriculation examination. Talking to the media, he said special children were significant part of our society and the government was taking revolutionary steps for providing them equal rights. / The News International


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El Centro, CA
GROUP AIMS TO HELP PARENTS OF DEAF, HARD-OF-HEARING KIDS
5-year-old Belani Acosta was born deaf and is the first toddler in Imperial Valley to have received cochlear implants, her parents said. The decision to opt for implants in 2010 also placed her parents, Julian and Claudia, in a unique position, where they didn’t know who to turn to for support or information. As a result, the El Centro couple decided to form a support group, Listen With Your Heart, and started handing out flyers at schools in search of parents of children who are deaf or hard of hearing. / Imperial Valley Press

Medford, MA
TUFTS ASL PROGRAM SEES GROWTH IN POPULARITY, OPPORTUNITIES TO INTERACT WITH DEAF COMMUNITY
Silence and sign language characterized Northeastern University’s annual event, “A Deaf, Deaf World,” on Oct. 10. This simulation, sponsored by the American Sign Language (ASL) Program at Northeastern, gave hearing students learning ASL the experience of interacting in a world where ASL is the dominant language. Students could wander around booths representing everyday activities in a typical town, like Chuck Baird’s art supply, Helen Keller’s Job Placement, Veditz College and a café. / Tufts Daily

Danville, KY
TECHNOLOGY HELPS KENTUCKY SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF STUDENTS READ TO, TEACH HEARING YOUTH IN DANVILLE
Taking off their student hats and putting on their teaching hats, high school students from the Kentucky School for the Deaf became “Reading Buddies” to area elementary students last Friday. The program helps expose the younger students to sign language.
Using iPads that read the story aloud, the high-schoolers then sign to the younger students, teaching them how to use American Sign Language to understand the book. / The Advocate Messenger

Internet
WHAT IT'S LIKE LIVING WITH A DEAF ADULT (DON'T HATE ME)
et me begin by saying that my wife, who is deaf, asked me to discuss this topic with her community sign language class. She asked me to share my point of view of what it’s like living with a deaf adult. I love my wife. This is not a rant. First of all, it’s totally not fair. I mean Children Of Deaf Adults have so much more than we spouses do, not the least of which is a really cool acronym; CODA! I guess I could call myself a SpODA (Spouse Of A Deaf Adult), but it sounds more like someone spitting in your general direction. Not cool. / A Silent Heart

New York, NY
GETTING OFF ON THE RIGHT FOOT
Miriam Liora Ganz and Rabbi Daniel Seth Horwitz are to be married Sunday in Schodack, N.Y. The bride, 33, is a certified freelance American Sign Language interpreter in Washington. She is a founder of Fourth Wall Gone, a theater initiative to promote discussion, programs and collaboration among deaf, hard-of-hearing and hearing members of the theater community in the Washington area. She graduated cum laude from American University and received a master’s in interpretation from Gallaudet. / The New York Times

Colorado Springs, CO
ASK GENERAL PALMER: HELPING DEAF, BLIND SCHOOL
Question: What role did you have in establishing the Colorado School for the Deaf and the Blind? Answer: I can't take much credit for it. A gentleman named Jonathan Kennedy arrived in Colorado Springs in 1874 with three of his own deaf children. There was no one to teach them, so Mr. Kennedy rented a house and began a school with seven pupils. / The Gazette


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WORKING WORLD
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Troy, MI
TOUCH-SCREEN DRIVE-THRU KIOSK AIDS HEARING IMPAIRED
What NEXTEP SYSTEMS describes as "The World's Fastest Drive Thru" has recently reached the 100-location milestone and is accelerating, the company said. Its touch-screen drive-thru kiosk was specifically developed for Quick Service Restaurants to speed production and reduce communication errors between customers ordering through the drive thru and team members inside the restaurant. The inability to properly communicate has lead to multiple lawsuits over the years for many of the largest names in fast food, especially when customers who are hearing impaired are unable to order or are denied service at the traditional drive thru. / Digital Signage Connection

Lakeland, FL
PUBLIX WIRES SOME STORES TO AID THOSE WITH HEARING IMPAIRMENT
Publix Super Markets Inc. is experimenting with a new service to reinforce its motto of giving shoppers a pleasurable experience. Three stores, including the Southgate Publix in Lakeland, are wired as part of a pilot program to help the hearing impaired converse easier with cashiers, the help desk and pharmaceutical staff. Stores in Sun City near Tampa and at The Villages just south of Ocala are included in the test. / The Ledger

San Antonio, TX
DEAF EDUCATION PROGRAM ATTRACTS $950,000 FEDERAL GRANT
The Master of Deaf Education and Hearing Science Program at the UT Health Science Center San Antonio has received nearly $1 million from the U.S. Department of Education. The six-semester master’s degree program accepts 12 students annually. The $950,000 federal award will provide full scholarships and semester stipends to 48 students over the next five years. Their careers will be an invaluable gift to children in South Texas and beyond, said program director Blane Trautwein. / HSC News

Meyersdale, PA
INSPIRED BY SIBLINGS, YOUTH PURSUES EDUCATION CAREER
Though she briefly considered pursuing physical therapy, 21-year-old Elizabeth Caton said that deep down she always knew she’d end up in education. But it was her youngest sibling who helped her figure out exactly where she fit. Caton’s 15-year-old brother, Max, was diagnosed with hearing loss in both ears at age 5. While she was in high school, Caton spent a day job shadowing her brother’s itinerant support teacher. “I fell in love with it,” she said. / Daily American

Sequim, WA
INTERPRETER FINDS JOY IN A JOB 'WELL SAID'
Janelle Hankinson has an effervescent personality and gesturing with her hands comes naturally as she talks. But more importantly, she puts her hands in service for the deaf in American Sign Language as the only certified interpreter on the Olympic Peninsula. ASL is the third most used language after English and Spanish in the U.S. She knew it would become her passion and profession early on. / Sequim Gazette

Frederick, MD
SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF RECEIVES HISTORICAL GRANT
[Maryland state officials] presented $1.2 million in matching grants Monday to 15 Maryland nonprofit and government entities in support of War of 1812 bicentennial projects. Two Frederick County nonprofits received grants, including the Maryland School for the Deaf Foundation, which received $5,000. The money will be used to conserve a cannon from the 1814 battle in Baltimore. / The Frederick News-Post

Farmington Hills, MI
DEAF & HEARING-IMPAIRED SERVICES TO ADD SUPPORT GROUPS
Farmington Hills-based Deaf & Hearing Impaired Services, Inc., a nonprofit agency that provides services for deaf and hard-of-hearing older adults and their families, has appointed Susan Sullivan as a Support Group Coordinator. Sullivan will be responsible for the creation and implementation of groups to enable hard-of-hearing individuals to understand their loss, share their experience and help one another. / Patch.com

Hillsboro, OR
SCIENTISTS TEACH SIGN LANGUAGE TO GORILLA-SUIT-WEARING MAN
In what is being hailed as a major breakthrough by the scientific community, a team of researchers announced Monday that they had successfully taught American Sign Language to a 43-year-old gorilla-suit-wearing man. Scientists at the Oregon National Primate Research Center told reporters that Brian, a western Kansas–born gorilla-costumed male living in their facility, has already learned well over 250 words in sign language, including all 26 letters of the alphabet, basic greetings, and even several short, simple phrases. / The Onion


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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT
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Los Angeles, CA
ROBERT REDFORD NEW FEARS
Film legend Robert Redford is at risk of going deaf after suffering dramatic hearing loss while filming his latest movie, friends fear. The beloved 76-year-old Oscar winner was repeatedly blasted with water on the set of the adventure thriller “All Is Lost” and battled a serious ear infection for weeks, revealed a source. “Bob plays a man lost at sea in a treacherous storm in the movie,” a source told The Enquirer. “It took him weeks to recover. In the end, doctors told him he’d lost 60 percent of the hearing in his left ear." / The National Enquirer

Washington, DC
WHY WE CAN GIVE THE DEAF SOUND, BUT NOT MUSIC
This child's face can explain the miracle of the cochlear implant—a device that bypasses a deaf person's damaged nerve cells, simulating a sense of sound in the brain—better than I can. That child will probably grow up with a near-normal ability to decipher speech in relative quiet. He probably will have a natural sounding voice. But as of now, he will not be able to hear music -- or at least all the aspects of it. To him, it will all be noise. / National Journal

New York, NY
DEAF JAMS: THE SURPRISING, CONFLICTED, THRIVING WORLD OF HEARING-IMPAIRED RAPPERS
Darius McCall was in eighth grade the first time he rapped in front of an audience. It did not go well. He performed for a talent contest at the public library in the Birmingham, Alabama, neighborhood where he grew up; but there were several factors conspiring against him. He didn't have the backing track, so he got a copy of the video and simply rapped over it. But the video version included a skit about Eazy-E smack in the middle. Stumped for what to do during the skit, McCall simply stood on stage and waited it out. "I didn't present myself well," says McCall. "It was so embarrassing." McCall is also deaf. / SPIN

Washington, DC
'BROKEN SPOKES' PREVIEW: A DEAF PLAY
When the most widely produced living Deaf playwright, Willy Conley wrote Broken Spokes, he imagined what it would be like to have an older brother. That idea turned into a beautifully written play that focuses on the relationship of two brothers, Jackson and Weston. After numerous productions of Broken Spokes appeared across America since 1990, Conley decided that it is time for him to direct his own play at Gallaudet University. / The Buff and Blue

Houston, TX
SPRING WOMAN'S BOOKS TRANSLATED INTO SIGN LANGUAGE
Spring-area resident Marcia Bennett has loved reading since she was a child. "I could not wait to get home from school and grab a snack and a book," said Bennett, 83. It means a lot to Bennett now to know that children's books she has written during the last decade could be enticing new generations of children to lose themselves in a story. "It is very gratifying," Bennett said. / Houston Chronicle

Slidell, LA
DEAF ACTION CENTER NORTH SHORE DONATION BRINGS 'GOODNIGHT MOON' NOV. 3 PERFORMANCE TO DEAF AUDIENCES
The generosity of Deaf Action Center North Shore has resulted in an extra special production of "Goodnight Moon" at Slidell Little Theatre. An interpreter for deaf children will be provided during the final performance of “Goodnight Moon” on Nov. 3, beginning at 2 p.m. “Goodnight Moon” – one of the most iconic children’s books of all time – is brought to life on stage for a final run this weekend by the Theatre for Young Audiences at Slidell Little Theatre. / NOLA.com


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SPORTS
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Washington, DC
GALLAUDET UNIVERSITY'S FOOTBALL TEAM IS A LONG WAY FROM GRAMBLING STATE
After about the fifth or sixth hour of a 450-mile slog of a bus ride to Castleton, Vt., last week, an NFL defensive line prospect did not curse his college-football fate or wonder why he couldn’t just get on an airplane for a game that far away. Nope. One student athlete’s horror story is Adham Talaat’s life experience. “For me, those bus rides are time for my teammates and me to bond, have memories all our life,” he says, unfolding his 6-foot-6, 270-pound-plus frame on his coach’s office couch. / The Washington Post

Pinellas Park, FL
DEAF SENIOR FOOTBALL PLAYER TYLER COOK HAS HELPED THE PINELLAS PARK PATRIOTS TO 7-0
The last time Pinellas Park was this good, none of the current players were even born. The Patriots are 7-0 for the first time since 1983. This weekend, that undefeated record will be put to the test against the East Lake Eagles - also 7-0. The Patriots will have a big challenge taking on the Eagles on the road but one Pinellas Park senior knows all about overcoming challenges. 10 News sports reporter Bobby Lewis introduces us to Tyler Cook, who just happens to be deaf. / WTSP

Athens, GA
DEAF LINEMAN, INTERPRETER WORK AS TEAM ON THE GRIDIRON
Lynn Young has several different titles among Clarke Central’s football players. The sign language interpreter works with junior nose guard T.J. Ellison. “They’re like, ‘T.J.’s on the D-line — she goes with T.J., so she’s D-line mama,’” Young said. Ellison, who was born hard of hearing and identifies as deaf, has recorded 12 tackles, one tackle for loss and a fumble recovery in his first year as a starter for the Gladiators. / Athens Banner-Herald

Houston, TX
HS VOLLEYBALL: CARTER SUCCEEDS DESPITE HEARING IMPAIRMENT
Ashley Carter doesn’t know any different. Her teammates and coaches don’t know any different. And when people see that Carter has hearing aids, she is happy to tell them what they are and why she has them. Because of a hearing impairment she’s had since birth, Carter has worn hearing aids since she was 6 weeks old. But that hasn’t stopped Carter from doing all the things other athletes do. / Mywesttexas.com

Palatine, IL
DEAF TENNIS PRO, TEACHER JENNY WOYAHN AMONG TOP PLAYERS WORLDWIDE, COMPETES IN DEAFLYMPICS
For many, tennis is a sport that requires good eye-hand coordination and the ability to swing, move quickly and to hear the sounds of tennis balls hitting the racket. Most tennis players rarely think about the sounds from the ball, but for a top deaf tennis player, it is a significant part of the game. At Midtown Athletic Club in Palatine, tennis pro Jenny Woyahn, 20, teaches tennis. Jenny was born with a hearing loss. / abc7chicago.com

Riverside, CA
DEAF SCHOOL STUDENTS TAKE PART IN RACE
Reagan Anders has been teaching elementary physical education at California School for the Deaf, Riverside, for the past seven years. She was looking for a way to encourage her students to compete along with hearing children their own age outside the school. She found it with the Mt. SAC Cross Country Invitational Run. On Oct. 19, the deaf school’s third- through fifth-grade students attended the cross country invitational track and field race. It was the second time Anders brought a team from the school to the event. / The Press-Enterprise


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Southwest Washington Center of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing, Inc. (SWCDHH)

Description:

Executive Director is responsible for agency operations and ensuring the delivery of both direct and indirect services to Deaf, Hard of Hearing and Deaf-Blind individuals in SWCDHH’s service area. These responsibilities include management of personnel and services: implementation of Board policies; communication with the public, Board and community; program development; fundraising; data collection and fulfilling state reporting requirements; and direct client services to provide mentoring, advocacy, community access, and information and referral.

Please submit cover letter, resume, and list of 3 professional references by regular mail or email.

SWCDHH
301 SE Hearthwood Blvd
Vancouver, WA 98684

searchcommittee@swcdhh.org

Contact Don Redford, Board Chairman at don.redford@gmail.com

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JOB OPENING

RELAY IOWA OUTREACH PROJECT MANAGER


Hamilton Relay
currently has a full-time position open for “Relay Iowa Outreach Project Manager”.

We are an equal opportunity employer. We do not discriminate on the basis of race, religion, color, sex, age, national origin or disability.

Position summary: This full-time position is responsible for coordinating and implementing outreach activities designed to promote Telecommunication Relay Services (TRS) and Captioned Telephone Relay Service (CapTel®) for Relay Iowa.

Education, Experience and Skills:
Bachelor’s degree and two or more years of experience in the design and implementation of public outreach, public relations or related marketing experience are required.
Experience in the telecommunication field, Traditional Relay Service or Captioned Telephone Service is a strong plus.
Excellent presentation skills
Ability to develop effective outreach and educational campaigns
Ability to confidently communicate (oral & written) with a wide variety of audiences
Ability to plan, schedule and execute multiple projects
Ability to understand and follow directions
Capacity to develop and maintain effective working relationships with Relay Administrator, organizations within the public, private and non-profit sectors
Knowledge of and ability to understand various communication modes used by current and potential relay users
Familiarity with the user communities that could benefit from relay services:
Senior Community
Hard of Hearing Community
Deaf Community
Speech Disabled
Able to travel alone
Individuals who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing are encouraged to apply.

For the full job description and application visit www.workforhamilton.com or contact HR at 402.694.5101 or 800.821.1831 by November 15, 2013

Hamilton Relay is a division of Hamilton Telecommunications based in Aurora, NE.

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TEACHERS (Blind/Deaf)

The Georgia School for the Deaf located in Cave Springs, Georgia (Floyd County) is searching for applicants who meet the “Highly Qualified” provision of the federal No Child Left Behind Act. These are 10-month (200 day) school positions, paid over 12 months. Instructional planning; provides individual differentiated instruction; assesses and analyzes student progress, creates and maintains a positive and academically challenging bilingual learning environment; and performs other duties as assigned. For additional information, qualifications and to download a State of Georgia Application of Employment (required) click on the Employment link at www.gsdweb.org. Applications can be: mailed: The Georgia School for the Deaf, Personnel Office-Gail Blankenship, 232 Perry Farm Road SW, Cave Spring, GA 30124; faxed: 706-777-2240 or emailed: gail.blankenship@doe.k12.ga.us.

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PAHrtners Deaf Services is Expanding to Pittsburgh

www.pahrtners.com/careers

www.facebook.com/deafjobs

NEW CAREER OPPORTUNITIES IN PITTSBURGH AND GLENSIDE

PAHrtners Deaf Services is a dynamic team of behavioral health professionals serving Deaf and Hard of Hearing children and adults. Located outside of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, PAHrtners provides residential and out-patient services to Deaf and Hard of Hearing (HoH) children, adolescents and adults. Over 85% of our staff members are Deaf or Hard of Hearing!

As a result of our commitment to the Deaf/HoH community PAHrtners is rapidly growing and expanding. Whether you are a high school graduate, recent college graduate or professional with many years of experience in the field of human services, we have a career-building position waiting for you! E.O.E.

PAHrtners is looking for dedicated, motivated, energetic individuals who are fluent in American Sign Language and knowledgeable in Deaf culture to fill the following positions:

-- ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT – Full Time; Glenside location
-- STAFF INTERPRETER – Full Time or Part Time; Glenside location
-- RESIDENTIAL PROGRAM DIRECTOR – Full Time; Glenside location
-- RESIDENTIAL CASE MANAGER – Full Time; Pittsburgh location
-- RESIDENTIAL COUNSELORS – Full Time, Part Time, On Call; Glenside and Pittsburgh locations
-- OFFICE MANAGER/INTERPRETER – Full Time; Pittsburgh location

Go to our Website at: www.PAHrtners.com to learn more about each position.
Like us on Facebook at: www.facebook.com/deafjobs

Send your letter of intent and resume to:

Linda Claypool, Office Manager/HR
PAHrtners Deaf Services
614 N. Easton Road
Glenside, PA 19038

Email: lclaypool@pahrtners.com
Fax: 215-884-6301; 215-884-9770 TTY/V

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