deafweekly

 

October 23, 2013
Vol. 10, No. 1

Editor: Tom Willard

Deafweekly is an independent news report for the deaf and hard-of-hearing community that is mailed to subscribers on Wednesdays and available to read at www.deafweekly.com. These are the actual headlines and portions of recent deaf-related news articles, with links to the full story. Minor editing is done when necessary. Deafweekly is copyrighted 2013 and any unauthorized use is prohibited.

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Last issue's most-read story: MANY DEAF SCHOOL STUDENTS WEREN'T RAISED WITH SIGN LANGUAGE / The Press-Enterprise
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NATIONAL
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Tempe, AZ
FEDS TRYING TO ELIMINATE HOUSING FOR THE DEAF -- AT COMPLEX BUILT FOR HEARING-IMPAIRED
Arizona is defying a federal order to eliminate apartments for deaf seniors at a housing complex built specifically -- for the deaf. "I think it's about the most ridiculous thing I've heard in a while," said Sen. Jeff Flake, R-Ariz., who attempted to negotiate the impasse. A 2005 federal study found that the U.S. had virtually no affordable housing for the deaf. So the federal government helped build Apache ASL Trails, a 75-unit apartment building in Tempe, Ariz., designed specifically for the deaf. But now, the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development says Apache ASL Trails violates civil rights law -- because it shows a preference for the hearing-impaired. / Fox News

Philadelphia, PA
VICTIM IN ALLEGED KIDNAP FOR BENEFITS CASE TESTIFIES WITH HELP OF 4 SIGN-LANGUAGE INTERPRETERS
A judge has sentenced a South Philadelphia man to up to five years in prison for violating probation in an endangering a child case, based on the extraordinary testimony of a 63-year-old man who can’t hear or speak, read or write, and who has minimal sign language skills. Defendant Dwayne Young allegedly violated probation by locking victim Willie Richardson in his basement and stealing his money. And prosecutor Noel Ann DeSantis proved her case with the help of four sign-language interpreters working together, who interpreted Richardson’s sounds, gestures, facial expressions, even eye movements, used picture boards and engaged in role playing demonstrations with each other and the witness to demonstrate words and concepts. / CBS Philly

Poway, CA
DEAF TEEN IN LONG LEGAL BATTLE WITH SCHOOL DISTRICT FOR TRANSCRIBING SERVICE
A Poway High School senior has been battling the Poway Unified School District for years over what she says is a necessary accommodation for herself and other deaf and hard-of-hearing students. Delanie Harrington, who is 17, was diagnosed as deaf as a toddler. A cochlear implant and hearing aids have helped, but Harrington, who does not use American Sign Language and was raised to speak, wants the district to provide her and other deaf and hard-of-hearing students with a interpreting system called CART (Communication Access RealTime Translation), which the district has denied. / Pomerado News

Washington, DC
DEAF ADVOCATES SUING UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND FOR ACCESS HAVE TRACK RECORD FOR SUCCESS
The lawsuit filed in September by the National Association of the Deaf against the University of Maryland for its lack of amenities for deaf fans at sporting events is just one of many such efforts to ensure hearing-impaired sports enthusiasts can enjoy themselves at stadiums. Association CEO Howard A. Rosenblum said his organization has successfully sued other athletic organizations over the same issue, including the Washington Redskins, Ohio State University and the University of Kentucky. / Capital Gazette

San Diego, CA
ASL CLUB PLEA UNIVERSITY FOR PROGRAM'S RETURN
Isaiah Moore stands in complete silence surrounded by a group of about 20 students. Though no words are spoken aloud, Moore’s agile hands tell his story to his captive audience. Moore, unlike most of the students around him, is deaf. He has spent most of his life in deaf education, but he is able to communicate to his hearing audience through American Sign Language. “I used to want to go to SDSU,” Moore signed. “But since they closed the deaf studies program there is no place for me here.” / The Daily Aztec

Council Bluffs, IA
IOWA SCHOOL FOR DEAF STUDENTS LET LOOSE THEIR 'ROAR' FOR KATY PERRY CONTEST
When Katy Perry and “Good Morning America” announced the Roar with Katy Perry contest last month, high school students at the Iowa School for the Deaf jumped at the opportunity. The contest offered the chance to win a live performance from Perry, but that wasn’t what motivated the students to participate. Instead, it was a chance to show off their school — and how proud they are to be a part of it. The contest required high school students to create a video interpretation of any portion of Perry’s song “Roar.” / Omaha World-Herald

Laredo, TX
90 AREA DEAF STUDENTS FIND NORMALCY AT LISD
Belen Villarreal stands at the front of her classroom at Cigarroa Middle School, microphone headset on and hands moving with swift motion. Villarreal’s students are doing research on people who are just like them, people who are deaf. Laredo Independent School District is charged with providing education for 90 deaf students in Webb and Zapata counties. Deaf and hard-of-hearing students have the option of attending Texas School for the Deaf in Austin but many stay in their home areas to be close to family. / Laredo Morning Times

Vineland, NJ
'CLASSROOM CLOSE-UP, NJ' SPOTLIGHTS POPULAR VINELAND SIGN LANGUAGE TEACHER
Although the classroom was silent, students were abuzz with conversation, interacting with each other through American Sign language (ASL). They had to stay quiet because a television crew from “Classroom Close-up, NJ” was filming a feature on their teacher Juliana Frankenfield Wednesday. The majority of the signing was between an interpreter and two deaf students, but some of the Vineland High School teenagers were also asking their teacher if there is still going to be a quiz on Friday. “They’re used to having class without spoken English,” Frankenfield said. / South Jersey Times

Washington, DC
FEMA, NPR PARTNER ON EMERGENCY ALERT PREPAREDNESS FOR DEAF AND HARD-OF-HEARING
The Department of Homeland Security's (DHS's) Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) announced a cooperative pilot project with National Public Radio's (NPR's) technology research and development group, NPR Labs, to demonstrate the delivery of the first-ever, real-time emergency alert messages to people who are deaf or hard-of-hearing in five Gulf states. Twenty-five NPR-affiliated public radio stations throughout Alabama, Florida, Louisiana, Mississippi and Texas agreed to participate in the pilot project to transmit emergency alert messages, such as weather alerts, to 475 individuals who are deaf or hard-of-hearing. / Radio Magazine

Harrisburg, PA
NEW HELP FOR DEAF AND HARD-OF-HEARING PEOPLE
The Disability Rights Network of Pennsylvania has come out with a series of fact sheets and videos to help deaf and hard-of-hearing people. According to a news release, the program is designed to explain the rights of people who are deaf or hard of hearing in medical settings such as doctor's offices and hospitals, courts and law offices, police settings and jails, places of employment, entertainment venues and in facilities providing intellectual disability services. / Lehigh Valley Health

Jackson Twp., OH
DEAF, HARD-OF-HEARING INDIVIDUALS ENCOURAGED TO PARTNER WITH GOVERNMENT
Kate Croteau, 15, is hard of hearing. The problem is worsening with age, so she’s learning American Sign Language. The teenager, from Galion, came with her mother, Helene, to the Ohio Association of the Deaf conference in Jackson Township at the suggestion of her sign language instructor. Friday marked Kate’s first ASL event, and she said the outing was helping her learn the fluidity of the language. / Canton Repository

Plymouth, MN
MIRACLE-EAR FOUNDATION GIVES [HEARING AIDS] TO FIRST ADULT RECIPIENT
Miracle-Ear of Longview, Wash., a part of the nationwide hearing solution franchise, partnered with the Miracle-Ear Foundation to give [hearing aids] to Mary McDaniel. Mary is the first adult to receive hearing aids since the nonprofit expanded its reach to provide assistance to both hearing impaired children and adults. / PRWeb


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INTERNATIONAL
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Chennai, India
HEARING-IMPAIRED MEN RUN OVER BY TRAIN IN CHENNAI
Two hearing-impaired men were run over by an electric train in Pattabiram on Sunday evening. According to police, one of the victims was Koti, 56, who lived with his family in Tiruvallur. He had retired recently after working at a government office. On Sunday morning, he left home with his brother-in-law Veeramani. The two had set out to distribute invitations for Koti’s son’s wedding. The police identified them with the help of the invitation cards and other documents the two had on them. / The Hindu

London, England
HOW DEAF WOMEN ARE VULNERABLE TO DOMESTIC ABUSE: THE TRAGIC STORY OF SAFIYA
Safiya is in a cellar. She’s ten years old and is deaf and mute. It’s cold and damp and she can’t hear who’s coming. It was back in Pakistan that her mother and father died and she’s been brought somewhere dark she doesn’t know. An elderly man slaps her. She is raped. The man and his wife make her serve them. She cooks the meals and cleans the house. She washes their car and is told to do the same for their friends. He beats her. She can’t read or write and is kept away from school. / NewStatesman

London, England
PARALYMPIC COMMITTEE CLARIFIES REPORTS THAT DEAF SPORTS ARE IN FOR TOKYO 2020
The International Paralympic Committee (IPC) has moved to dismiss reports that deaf sports will be included in the Paralympic Games in Tokyo 2020. On the official IPC website a statement appeared on Friday saying that the IPC Chairman, Sir Philip Craven, had been misquoted as saying that it was an IPC objective for deaf sports to be included in the 2020 games in Tokyo while he actually said it was an ICSD (International Committee of Sports for the Deaf) objective to get some events included for deaf athletes. / The Limping Chicken

Gloucestershire, England
HAVE YOU HEARD THE ONE ABOUT THE DEAF COMEDIAN?
When a Gloucestershire deaf charity booked world-renowned comedian John Smith for a gig little did they know just what a hit he was going to be. His stand-up routine, which is performed entirely using British Sign Language, proved popular when he performed at the Gloucestershire Deaf Association's Barnwood community centre on Friday night. Events co-ordinator, Gemma Sills, said: "A lot of comedy acts are out of bounds for deaf people and we wanted to bring something to our own centre that would reach out to our community." / This is Gloucestershire

Hertfordshire, England
DEAF ROYSTON MAN DENIED SHUTTLE BUS ACCESS
A deaf man has made a formal complaint after he and his assistance dog were denied access to an airport shuttle bus. Tony McMurray, of Priory Close, Royston, attempted to board the bus with his dog, Mac, as he was dropping his partner off at Luton Airport. However, the driver of the vehicle, which is operated by APCOA Parking, refused to take him because he said dogs were not allowed to travel. / Royston Crow

Dublin, Ireland
PARENTS OF DEAF CHILDREN BACK ON THE STREETS TO HIGHLIGHT CAMPAIGN
Members of the Happy New Ear Campaign were back outside the Dail last week in their latest attempt to secure Government funding for a bilateral cochlear implant program for deaf children. Parents held a one-minute silence in support of the children whose single cochlear implants have failed, plunging them back into a world of silence. In Ireland, single cochlear implants are provided for profoundly deaf children. However, best international practice is for two implants to be simultaneously inserted. / Dublin People

Galway, Ireland
IRISH SIGN LANGUAGE PHOTOGRAPHY EXHIBITION TO OPEN IN GALWAY CITY MUSEUM
Where would you be likely to find [numerous Irish celebrities] in one room? A stunning photography exhibition featuring all these celebrities and many more will be showing in Galway at the city museum. The exhibition is a free event open to the public in Galway City Museum November 4-18. "Signs of Life" is organized by the Irish Deaf society and is the first Irish Sign Language (ISL) celebrity photography exhibition. / Galway Advertiser

Haifa, Israel
BEDOUIN SIGN LANGUAGE MAY BE THE KEY TO HUMAN LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT
The unique sign language of a Bedouin tribe in the Negev is giving researchers in Israel a priceless look at how humans develop language. Professor Wendy Sandler and her staff, along with a pair of American researchers, have been researching the unique sign language used by the Al-Said Bedouin tribe in the Negev town of Hura for over a decade. The study has revealed a complex, language creation process in a setting with no prior linguistic example. / Haaretz

Dubai, United Arab Emirates
DEAF PASSENGERS TO 'HEAR' IN SMART DUBAI TAXIS
Dubai taxis will soon have the ability for passengers to tap the electronic screen to access the airport’s website or even your airline’s. This is especially handy for visitors without Internet connection for their smartphones or tablets. This and other ways in which Dubai taxis are becoming smarter have been publicized at the Dubai Taxi Corporation stand at international technology fair Gitex 2013, which kicked off on October 20. / Khaleej Times


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LIFE & LEISURE
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Los Angeles, CA
MOM WHO CAN'T HEAL SON'S DEAFNESS IS DOING SOMETHING WRONG, CLAIMS PAT ROBERTSON
Pat Robertson claimed Sunday on the 700 Club that he has healed deaf people and that a woman who cannot heal her deaf son must be doing something "wrong." Robertson received a letter from a female viewer who wrote, "My son is hearing impaired and cannot hear at all. I have prayed for his healing; it seems as if God is hearing-impaired. What am I doing wrong?" Said Robertson. "I have dealt with people who are deaf and you rebuke the spirit of deafness and they get healed." / Opposing Views

New York, NY
DON'T HATE ME BECAUSE I CAN'T HEAR YOU
"We cran do your earwig pest cow," the nurse said. "What?" I asked. "I said, 'We can do your hearing test now.'" Uh-oh. Over the last few years, I've noticed my hearing is starting to go. I'm constantly asking people to repeat themselves. At restaurants, I have to lean in and strain to decipher the conversation, and at home, my kids regularly tease me about my hearing, shouting out non-sequiturs like "Louisiana Purchase" or "Barack Obama" to illustrate how far off I am with my guesses at what they've just said. / The Huffington Post

Paramus,NJ
ABANDONED BUT DEAF-EATED BY NO ONE. THE INSPIRING SUCCESS STORY OF A DISABLED HONDURAN ORPHAN
Living in a country where there is little hope for the Deaf, especially the orphaned, 7 -year-old Nori won the hearts of a couple, Bob and Pat Rittenhouse. Her story, however, doesn’t end there. "Nori: The Story of a Deaf Honduran Orphan and the Goodness of God," told by adoptive father Robert K. Rittenhouse, follows the remarkable story of a Honduras child and her adoption by a family on a missionary trip. / The Paramus Post

Corpus Christi, TX
CENTER HOSTS 'A NIGHT OF HEROES'
The Corpus Christi Deaf and Hard of Hearing Center hosted it's annual fundraiser Tuesday night called "A Night of Heroes." The event was held at the Omni Bayfront. Several community members were honored for their support of the center. There was a silent auction, as well as a motivational speech by Paralympic Ski Racer and Comedian, Josh Sundquist. / KiiiTV3.com

West Lafayette, IN
CLUB PROMOTES DEAF CULTURE THROUGH SIGNING AND MUSIC
Though the American Sign Language Club consists of almost 100 students, only one of these members is deaf. Jonathan Mesich, a senior in the College of Liberal Arts and the club’s vice president, said a few hard-of-hearing members are involved in the club, but he is the only deaf student. Both Mesich and Rachel Roembke, the club’s president and a senior in the College of Liberal Arts, hope for this to change in the future by gaining more deaf members. / Purdue Exponent

St. Joseph, MO
SERTOMA CLUB CONTINUES WORK FOR DEAF CHILDREN
Kaylee Wells' friends supported her at the St. Joseph Sertoma Club's "Don't Walk In Silence" event. The 10-year-old was one of about 150 others who walked to bring awareness for kids like herself. "There's some deaf people here and I can socialize with them," Wells said. This is the second annual Celebrate Sound walk. Part of the money raised from the event goes toward looping another building in St. Joseph. / stjoechannel.com

Columbus, OH
AN INSIDE LOOK AT THE DEAF COMMUNITY IN COLUMBUS
American Sign Language, or ASL, is an increasingly popular language to take at Capital University. Four ASL courses are offered. ASL is just one component that compromises deaf culture. Chris Driscoll, a deaf professor at Capital, provided some insight into this captivating culture. What is the biggest misconception about Deaf Culture? / The Chimes


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WORKING WORLD
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Mountain View, CA
GOOGLE PATENTS GESTURES: THE SIGN LANGUAGE OF THE FUTURE
As life reflects art, Google has now been awarded a gesture patent which is ideal for their most controversial innovation, Glass, which will open up many possibilities for further development. Today, if you happen to see someone making cryptic hand gestures, it’s probably the extroverted movements of a hip hop artist or sign language (or you're watching a muted clip of Eminem). Now Google is working on a new type of sign language for everyone. / AndroidPIT

Atlanta, GA
IMPROVED COCHLEAR IMPLANT PROMISES DEAF PEOPLE CRISPER QUALITY OF SOUND
Cochlear implants help deaf people perceive sound; they convert sound waves into electrical signals that are sent directly to the brain. But for those with the implants -- approximately 188,000 people worldwide -- the sound can be muffled, dampened and far from perfect. Engineer Pamela Bhatti and other researchers at Georgia Institute of Technology are creating a better cochlear implant that can improve the sound quality for those who can't hear without them. / PBS NewsHour


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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT
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Washington, DC
DEAF 'PROJECT RUNWAY' FINALIST: SCIENCE IS A PART OF WHO I AM
While designer Dom Streator won first place, fellow "Project Runway" finalist Justin LeBlanc -- the program’s first-ever deaf contestant -- was a favorite of many fans. LeBlanc was born with profound deafness, unable to hear any sound at all. At the age of 18, he was outfitted with a cochlear implant which enabled him to hear for first time. In an interview with Raw Story, the designer discussed his relationship with technology and science and how that relationship has influenced his work. / The Raw Story

Spartanburg, SC
USC UPSTATE WELCOMES AUTHOR, ACTIVIST SUSAN BURCH
Author and activist Susan Burch will visit USC Upstate Tuesday as part of Diversity Week. Burch is the co-author of “Unspeakable: The Story of Junius Wilson,” which tells of a man who spent 76 years at a state mental hospital in Goldsboro, N.C., though he was never declared insane nor was he convicted of any criminal charge. But he was deaf and black in the Jim Crow South. / GoUpstate.com

Framingham, MA
RAPPER THRILLS STUDENTS AT SCHOOL FOR DEAF IN FRAMINGHAM
Over a thunderous bass that shook the gym Monday morning, Sean Forbes rapped about life, love and adversity, illustrating it all with a constant stream of hand movements and gestures. Afterwards, he told the audience, almost all of which was deaf or hard of hearing students, that many people still can't believe a performance like his exists. / The MetroWest Daily News

New York, NY
TDF TO BRING 450 DEAF OR HARD-OF-HEARING STUDENTS TO 'CINDERELLA'
Over 450 elementary and secondary school students who are either deaf or hard of hearing from 17 schools in the tri-State region, will attended one of the next three Wednesday matinee performances of the hit musical Rodgers + Hammerstein's Cinderella. Three upcoming matinee performances of the show will be simultaneously sign language interpreted and open captioned by TDF's Accessibility Programs (TAP). / Broadway World


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SPORTS
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Washington, DC
BISON FOOTBALL INTERCEPTION VIDEO GAINS NATIONAL ATTENTION
A video posted on Tuesday, September 28, by the Gallaudet University football coaching staff of a great play by the Bison football team in its game against Castleton State College on Saturday, September 25 has gained national attention. As of Friday, October 1 at around 4 p.m., the clip had been viewed 1,758,842 times worldwide! / Gallaudet University

Beaumont, TX
HEARING-IMPAIRED HUNTER MAKING MOST OF CHANCE WITH CARDINALS
Noise begins to fill the locker room. It is less than two hours before kickoff and the Lamar football team is gearing up for another Saturday showdown. As the coaching staff discusses last-minute details, the sounds of players being wrapped with athletic tape and the clattering of cleats begin to reverberate throughout the space. In the locker of junior defensive back Montez Hunter, that commotion sounds muffled. The noise doesn't become clear until he puts on his most important piece of equipment for that day's game - his two hearing aids. / Beaumont Enterprise

St. Augustine, FL
FSDB FOOTBALL HAS NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP POTENTIAL WITH JUST ONE LOSS
The FSDB football team can potentially accomplish a feat its school hasn’t seen in over 30 years – a Deaf National Championship. After beginning the season with a 6-1 record and taking down local competition as well as opposition from Indiana and Alabama, the Dragons are gearing up for the possibility of the first Deaf National Championship honor since 1978. / The St. Augustine Record

DuBois, PA
DUBOIS PLAYER TACKLES HEARING DISORDER
It's all about teamwork when it comes to football. That is why DuBois Beaver Bradley Peterson and his interpreter, Jenna Liddle Volpe, are such great partners. Unlike his identical twin brother, Joe, Bradley was born with auditory neuropathy, a hearing disorder in which sound enters the inner ear normally but is unable to properly travel to the brain, according to his mother, Faye Peterson. As a result, Bradley's hearing was severely limited. "So he doesn't hear things the way that we would hear them if he hears things at all," Faye said. / The Courier Express

Austin, TX
BASKETBALL PLAYER TELLS DEAF STUDENTS TO GO WITH THEIR DREAMS
Students of the hearing impaired program at Overton Elementary School got a chance to meet one of their idols during school Tuesday, Oct. 22, when Red Raiders point guard Luke Adams walked through their library doors. The students had been reading biographies in class and decided to research Adams in honor of Deaf Awareness Week. Adams was born deaf and was open to discussing both his struggles and successes as a fellow deaf person with the children — emphasizing that it’s OK to be different and that none of them should let the impairment keep them from achieving their dreams. / Lubbock Avalance-Journal


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EMPLOYMENT
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You can advertise your job openings here for just $20 a week (up to 100 words, 10 cents each add'l word). To place your ad, send the announcement to mail@deafweekly.com.

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TEACHERS (Blind/Deaf)

The Georgia School for the Deaf located in Cave Springs, Georgia (Floyd County) is searching for applicants who meet the “Highly Qualified” provision of the federal No Child Left Behind Act. These are 10-month (200 day) school positions, paid over 12 months. Instructional planning; provides individual differentiated instruction; assesses and analyzes student progress, creates and maintains a positive and academically challenging bilingual learning environment; and performs other duties as assigned. For additional information, qualifications and to download a State of Georgia Application of Employment (required) click on the Employment link at www.gsdweb.org. Applications can be: mailed: The Georgia School for the Deaf, Personnel Office-Gail Blankenship, 232 Perry Farm Road SW, Cave Spring, GA 30124; faxed: 706-777-2240 or emailed: gail.blankenship@doe.k12.ga.us.

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PAHrtners Deaf Services is Expanding to Pittsburgh

www.pahrtners.com/careers

www.facebook.com/deafjobs

NEW CAREER OPPORTUNITIES IN PITTSBURGH AND GLENSIDE

PAHrtners Deaf Services is a dynamic team of behavioral health professionals serving Deaf and Hard of Hearing children and adults. Located outside of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, PAHrtners provides residential and out-patient services to Deaf and Hard of Hearing (HoH) children, adolescents and adults. Over 85% of our staff members are Deaf or Hard of Hearing!

As a result of our commitment to the Deaf/HoH community PAHrtners is rapidly growing and expanding. Whether you are a high school graduate, recent college graduate or professional with many years of experience in the field of human services, we have a career-building position waiting for you! E.O.E.

PAHrtners is looking for dedicated, motivated, energetic individuals who are fluent in American Sign Language and knowledgeable in Deaf culture to fill the following positions:

-- ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT – Full Time; Glenside location
-- STAFF INTERPRETER – Full Time or Part Time; Glenside location
-- RESIDENTIAL PROGRAM DIRECTOR – Full Time; Glenside location
-- RESIDENTIAL CASE MANAGER – Full Time; Pittsburgh location
-- RESIDENTIAL COUNSELORS – Full Time, Part Time, On Call; Glenside and Pittsburgh locations
-- OFFICE MANAGER/INTERPRETER – Full Time; Pittsburgh location

Go to our Website at: www.PAHrtners.com to learn more about each position.
Like us on Facebook at: www.facebook.com/deafjobs

Send your letter of intent and resume to:

Linda Claypool, Office Manager/HR
PAHrtners Deaf Services
614 N. Easton Road
Glenside, PA 19038

Email: lclaypool@pahrtners.com
Fax: 215-884-6301; 215-884-9770 TTY/V

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