deafweekly

 

October 9, 2013
Vol. 9, No. 49

Editor: Tom Willard

Deafweekly is an independent news report for the deaf and hard-of-hearing community that is mailed to subscribers on Wednesdays and available to read at www.deafweekly.com. These are the actual headlines and portions of recent deaf-related news articles, with links to the full story. Minor editing is done when necessary. Deafweekly is copyrighted 2013 and any unauthorized use is prohibited.

Please support our advertisers; they make it possible for you to receive Deafweekly.

SIGN UP HERE for a free subscription. Be sure to open the confirmation email and click on the link to activate your subscription. It is required by law and prevents others from signing you up without your permission.

ADDRESS CHANGES are self serve. Simply unsubscribe using the link at the bottom of every newsletter, then sign up for a subscription with your new address.

Last issue's most-read story: GALLAUDET DIVERSITY OFFICER ACCUSES UNIVERSITY OF DISCRIMINATION IN LAWSUIT / The Washington Post
Last week's website page views:5,718
Deafweekly subscribers as of today: 5,292

ADVERTISE IN DEAFWEEKLY FOR $20 OR LESS PER WEEK





+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
NATIONAL
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

St. Augustine, FL
TRUCK DRIVER COMES FORWARD IN FATAL CRASH THAT KILLED DEAF STUDENTS
Investigators have recovered an 18-wheeler and talked to the driver in connection with a hit-and-run that killed two deaf students. The Florida Highway Patrol says Robert Bates has come forward. Bates is a person of interest in a crash on the Florida Turnpike near Fort Pierce Monday night. Investigators say Mariah King and Vincent Mathews, two former students from the Florida School for the Deaf and the Blind, stopped to change a flat tire on their car when a big rig hit them from behind. / ActionNewsJax.com

Washington, DC
GOVERNMENT SHUTDOWN COULD IMPERIL THEATER OWNERS' LOBBYING ASSAULT
The National Association of Theater Owners spent the weekend notifying its members that a planned lobbying assault scheduled for Oct. 1 may become impossible if a proposed U.S. government shutdown takes effect that day. More than 30 theater owners had planned to travel to Washington, D.C, to hold at least 75 meetings with their respective members of Congress to discuss a variety of issues, including a proposed Justice Department rule requiring exhibitors to provide closed captioning and video descriptions for the deaf and blind. / Hollywood Reporter

Washington, DC
WASHINGTON FOOD MARKET BECOMES HUB FOR DEAF COMMUNITY
A year-old food market in a Washington, D.C., neighborhood has become a unique hub of shopping and dining for the city's Deaf community. One feature that draws many hard of hearing customers to Union Market is the ability to communicate with staff members like Thadeus Suggs. The 23-year-old lunchtime food vendor from Seattle interacts with them easily because he is fluent in American Sign Language. / Voice of America

Lynchburg, VA
NEW BACHELOR'S DEGREE IN ASL AND INTERPRETING OFFERED
This semester Liberty University became the first school in Virginia to offer a Bachelor of Arts in American Sign Language & Interpreting (ASLI). There are only 39 other schools across the country offering the degree. The new program equips students with both the technical skills and educational credentials required to complete the National Interpreter Certification exam (administered by the Registry of interpreters for the Deaf) and become professional sign language interpreters. / Liberty University

Cape Coral, FL
DIALOGUE WITH THE DEAF
Anne Greenall is undergoing an asthma screening; interacting with a respiratory therapist, despite the fact she can't hear a thing. She doesn't have to. An interpreter is bridging the gap. "It helps me a lot," says Greenall. "I'm able to communicate effectively with hearing people," says Jody Belcher, certified interpreter with Lee Memorial Health System. The Americans with Disabilities Act requires hospitals to provide effective communication for the hearing impaired in all health care settings. / WBBH

Lafayette, LA
AMELIA MANOR IS FIRST NURSING HOME IN THE AREA STARTING PROGRAM FOR DEAF-BLIND PATIENTS
For the deaf and the blind in our community things are changing. Amelia Manor has been a big part of that change as the first nursing home in the state to hire interpreters for deaf and blind patients. Finally these patients can communicate. "Before he was very, very sad. Now we encourage each other. He was depressed, very depressed," says Kim Hebert, a deaf patient at Amelia Manor. / KADN Fox 15

Pittsburgh, PA
WORK ON DORM UNDER WAY AT EDGEWOOD SCHOOL FOR DEAF
Kai Miller, 15, knows the ins and outs of her school well enough to be a tour guide. The sophomore, who is hard-of-hearing, has been a student at the Western Pennsylvania School for the Deaf in Edgewood since 2010, the Lackawanna County resident said in sign language interpreted by Joan Stone, coordinator of interpreting services. She and other students who stay in a campus dorm from Sunday evenings to Friday afternoons will move into the school's new $9.3 million dorm in September. / Pittsburgh Tribune-Review

West Hartford, CT
MEETING ON AMERICAN SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF LAND DEVELOPMENT POSTPONED
At the request of applicant Sard Custom Homes LLC, the town plan and zoning commission voted to postpone to Nov. 4 the public hearings and decision on the development of nine-plus acres of land at the rear of the American School for the Deaf property. Sard plans to build 12 homes on the land, a proposal that has neighbors worried about flooding and adverse effects on the environment. / The Hartford Courant

Cleveland, OH
THE DEAF AND HARD OF HEARING CAN USE FREE COMPUTERS AT CLEVELAND LIBRARIES THAT TRANSLATE SIGN LANGUAGE INTO SPOKEN ENGLISH
People who are deaf or hard of hearing can now carry on video conversations with family or friends using computers at the Cleveland Public Library that translate American Sign Language into spoken English. The service is like having a personal sign language translator via Skype. You can see exactly how the system, called the Sorenson Video Relay Service, works at tinyurl.com/videorelayservice. / The Plain Dealer


++++ADV+++++ADV+++++ADV+++

READ WHAT THEY SAY

Unlock the phone with CapTel® Captioned Telephone! CapTel shows word-for-word captions of everything a caller says over the phone, letting you read everything that they say. Like captions on TV – for the phone! Captions are provided by a free relay service, no monthly fees or contracts required. For more information or to order call 1-800-233-9130 V/TTY or visit http://www.weitbrecht.com/captel.html . For more info about CapTel or any of the many assistive listening devices we offer, email: sales@weitbrecht.com.

Follow us on Facebook and Twitter!

CapTel® Captioned Telephone – See What Everyone is Talking About!

++++ADV+++++ADV+++++ADV++++


Identity theft affects millions of Americans each year.

LegalShield offers two high quality identity theft plans. Best of all, both services provide Comprehensive Identity Restoration from Kroll Advisory Solutions. So in the unfortunate event something does happen to your identity, you’ll have professional help in getting your identity restored to what it was before the fraud occurred.

To ensure you have the best coverage possible, the LegalShield plans includes you and your spouse and for only an additional $1 per month you can add Safeguard for Minors to cover up to 8 dependent children under the age of 18.

Contact Keith Wann, Independent Associate, today 212.920.4985 or KeithWann@LegalShieldAssociate.com

++++ADV+++++ADV+++++ADV++++






+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
INTERNATIONAL
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

London, England
WATCH: HOW DEAF REBELS HELPED OVERTHROW COLONEL GADAFFI
Back In 2011, many sections of Libyan society took up the armed struggle to overthrow Colonel Gadaffi and guess what? The deaf community in Libya was no different. The Misrata Deaf Brigade is one of seven brigades of rebel fighters from the city of Mistrata and is made up of 100 deaf rebels from all over Libya. The Third Brigade is a documentary that tells their story and is available to watch on BSLBT now. / The Limping Chicken

Sunderland, England
DEAF SUNDERLAND DRUG DEALER HAS DISCRIMINATION CLAIMS THROWN OUT
A deaf drug dealer who complained when police didn’t bring a sign language interpreter to a raid on his home has had a compensation bid thrown out by the country’s top civil judge. Bryan Finnigan, 33, claimed his rights under the 1995 Disability Discrimination Act and 2010 Equality Act were violated by officers. However, the Master of the Rolls, Lord Dyson, pointed out that Finnigan had been able to communicate well enough to sell cannabis to undercover police officers and dismissed all his claims as groundless. / Sunderland Echo

London, England
THE THRILL OF HEARING MY HUSBAND SAY 'I LOVE YOU' AFTER A DECADE OF SILENCE
My hands were shaking as I dialled my husband's number. It had, after all, been almost ten years since I'd last heard Tom's voice. 'Hello Sophie,' he said, sounding just as he had the first time we met, at a party in 2000. We both started to laugh with joy, so loudly that I nearly missed hearing him say: 'I love you.' Those words usually passed between us in sign language. I had been profoundly deaf for several years, and we had come to rely on signing to communicate. / The Daily Mail

London, England
DEAF CLUB CHANGES NAME
A club which helps and supports deaf people in the community has changed its name to encompass the whole borough. At Harrow Asian Deaf Club's annual meeting, members agreed the organisation will become the sole club for the borough and will change its name to Harrow United Deaf Club. The move comes after the closure of Harrow Deaf Club nearby just over six months ago and it is hoped the new name will show the inclusive nature of the group. / Harrow Times

Falkirk, Scotland
DEAFNESS IS NO BARRIER TO OPENING A BUSINESS
An entrepreneurial-spirited woman from Denny has overcome the odds to open her first business. Elizabeth Lafferty has taken control of a laundry despite being profoundly deaf and unable to speak. She will communicate with her suppliers and customers with the assistance of a sign language interpreter. The new firm will offer laundry, ironing, dry cleaning, sewing and alteration services. / Falkirk Herald

Dublin, Ireland
DEAF SOCIETY PUTS PRESSURE ON GOVERNMENT
The Irish Deaf Society (IDS) has called on the government to set the wheels in motion towards achieving legal recognition for Irish Sign Language (ISL). The move follows a public protest outside the Dáil a fortnight ago that marked International Week of the Deaf. The motion on Irish Sign Language is expected to be brought before the Seanad today by Senator Conway. The motion has already been signed by 17 other senators. / Irish National News

Canberra, Australia
CHEERS FOR BOBBY DAZZLER
Canberra’s Bob Dalton won’t be able to hear the haka when he lines up against New Zealand in next Sunday’s rugby union Test match at Tuggeranong’s Viking Park, but you can bet he’ll still get a tingle down his spine. Dalton was born profoundly deaf and is one of the stars of the Australian deaf rugby team aiming up to defend the Cochlear Cup against New Zealand’s ‘Deaf Blacks’ in Canberra. / The Canberra Times

New Zealand
EASIER ACCESS TO SERVICES FOR DEAF PEOPLE
Minister for Disability Issues, Tariana Turia announced the introduction of a brand new service to help make government services more accessible to Deaf people. Video Remote Interpreting (VRI) is being progressively rolled out around the country in key government services. It connects a Deaf person to a New Zealand Sign Language interpreter based in an Auckland call centre via an internet video connection and to a face-to-face meeting with a government service worker. / LiveNews.co.nz

Kingston, Jamaica
MORE LICENSES FOR THE DEAF -- ACCESSING INSURANCE COVERAGE REMAINS DIFFICULT
At least 12 deaf motorists have been granted a driver's licence recently. However Rian Gayle of the Jamaica Association for the Deaf (JAD), pointed out that there could be more, as persons in the rural areas have not been accounted for. Gayle said while many deaf persons attempt to earn a driver's licence, "we can't say how many attempt every year. We only know of those who are successful." Deaf motorists were allowed to take the driver's licence examination two years ago, after years of advocacy and debate. / Jamaica Gleaner

Malta
TIME FOR THE DEAF COMMUNITY TO BE GIVEN ITS DUE IMPORTANCE
The Minister for Family and Social Solidarity, Dr Marie Louise Coleiro Preca, said Saturday that it is time for measures to be taken in order to help members of the deaf community fully integrate into society. "We are well aware that, in the past, the deaf community, and its people, has not been given the attention they deserve. We are intent on changing that," Coleiro Preca said. The Minister was speaking at a Seminar on Deaf Awareness, which was organized by the Deaf People Association. / Malta Today

Tottori, Japan
TOTTORI CHAMPIONS SIGN LANGUAGE
The Tottori Prefectural Assembly adopted an ordinance Tuesday recognizing sign language and requiring the prefectural and municipal governments to develop environments to promote its use. It is the first ordinance in Japan to officially recognize sign language, according to the local government. / The Japan Times

Taipei, Taiwan
HEARING-IMPAIRED WOMEN STAR IN FILM
Two young women have won accolades for their performances in a small-budget film, which is a true-to-life depiction of their experiences overcoming hearing impairments and battling discrimination. Chiang Wen-yi and Lin Ching-lan, who were cast in the leading roles, attended the film’s premiere on Wednesday last week to meet the audience and speak about their experiences. / Taipei Times

Hong Kong
FAILED BY THE SYSTEM: EXPERTS CONDEMN TREATMENT OF DEAF CHILDREN
A generation of hearing-impaired Hongkongers have trouble communicating because of a policy banning sign language from all classrooms and a lack of support, sign-language experts say. "They can't hear, can't speak, don't know sign language. Often they also can't write well because [the disability] really hinders them from learning in the common classroom," said Chris Yiu Kun-man, a project manager with the Centre for Sign Linguistics and Deaf Studies at Chinese University. / South China Morning Post

See Also HONG KONG'S 100,000 DEAF PEOPLE RELY ON JUST 10 HAND-SIGN TRANSLATORS / South China Morning Post


++++ADV+++++ADV+++++ADV++++

Experience the superior quality of Sorenson Communications ntouch ® VP, ntouch® PC and ntouch® Mobile – products designed specifically for deaf communication, with input from deaf consumers. With technology optimized for American Sign Language, Sorenson provides unmatched video clarity, making communication easy and the ntouch VP attaches to nearly any size screen. As always, ntouch products are provided at no cost, and experienced Sorenson Trainers make installation and training worry free. More deaf callers use Sorenson Communications than any other provider, and for good reason. Sorenson offers quality, service, reliability and innovative products. To get ntouch products, visit www.svrs.com/ntouch or call 801-386-8500 today and experience the power of your world in touch!

++++ADV+++++ADV+++++ADV++++


www.HealthBridges.info has a new look!!

HealthBridges provides reliable behavioral health, wellness, advocacy and resource information to Deaf, Deafblind, and Hard of Hearing people in ASL and English too.

In a format that is fully accessible, HealthBridges’ website posts educational videos, articles and source links.

HealthBridges supports effective communication between healthcare providers and patients by educating about cultural diversity and disability rights.

www.healthbridges.info. Launched September 3, 2013 there are major enhancement in website design:

-- A new landmark logo for Healthbridges
-- Better navigation, stability, usability and findability
-- Improved internal search engine
-- Joined social networking: Facebook and YouTube
-- 25% larger web content and 77% large video screen

Check us out at www.healthbridges.info or find us on Facebook

Share us with your family and friends!

The HealthBridges Team

++++ADV+++++ADV+++++ADV++++






+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
LIFE & LEISURE
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++


Rochester, NY
GROWING UP HEARING IN DEAF HOUSEHOLD
Maxine Childress Brown offers a glimpse into a world most people don’t know. Childress Brown, the former Rochester City Council member, tells the story of her childhood in the new book, On the Beat of Truth: A Hearing Daughter’s Stories of Her Black Deaf Parents (Gallaudet University Press, $29.95). Her book is a candid and vivid memoir of the challenges and triumphs that she and her sisters, Shirley and Barbara, faced as hearing children. / Democrat and Chronicle

Columbus, OH
AN INSIDE LOOK AT THE DEAF COMMUNITY IN COLUMBUS
American Sign Language, or ASL, is an increasingly popular language to take at Capital. Four ASL courses are offered- Elementary American Sign Language I, Elementary American Sign Language II, ASL Fingerspelling, and Intermediate American Sign Language I. ASL is just one component that compromises deaf culture. Chris Driscoll, a deaf professor at Capital, provided some insight into this captivating culture. / The Chimes

Bakersfield, CA
DEAF AWARENESS HIGHLIGHTED
International Deaf Awareness Week took place between Sept. 20-26, and the newly formed American Sign Language Club at Bakersfield College was out raising awareness for the deaf community. The club hosted various activities throughout the week. They sold T-shirts Sept. 22 at their booth, which also had information regarding the deaf culture and famous deaf people. / The Renegade Rip

Westbrook, ME
DIOCESE TO ENHANCE DEAF MINISTRY
In the spirit of supporting and encouraging deaf Catholics the Roman Catholic Diocese of Portland is asking for assistance in enhancing the deaf ministry in the state. No special training is necessary, just the desire to lend a helping hand. “The deaf community in Maine has a great need to be better served,” according to Monsignor Charles Murphy, director of the diaconate for the diocese. / Sun Chronicle


++++ADV+++++ADV+++++ADV++++

Stay Connected with Sprint IP Relay!

Use our new and improved Sprint IP Relay on your wireless device, computer and even your tablet! Registration is required before placing your first call.

Learn more at www.sprintip.com.

++++ADV+++++ADV+++++ADV++++






+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
WORKING WORLD
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Washington, DC
TEDXGALLAUDET CALL FOR PROPOSALS
Gallaudet University is proud to host its very first TEDxGallaudet! The event will take place on Friday, February 28, 2014, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Gallaudet University. TEDxGallaudet will feature up to four sessions, with five 15-minute presentations in each session, totaling 20 presentations. A TEDxGallaudet Program Committee has been assembled and is issuing a call for proposals for interested individuals to present at TEDxGallaudet. The deadline for proposals is Friday, November 15, 2013 at 5 p.m. ET. / Gallaudet University

Houston, TX
SIGN LANGUAGE INSTRUCTOR EAGER TO SHARE HER PASSION
The first time Sheila Johnstone saw people communicate in American Sign Language, she was mesmerized. "I'm a dancer, and it looked like dancing to me," the Tanglewood-area resident said. "It was exquisite to me, and I wanted to learn it." Johnstone, who has no deaf relatives, learned the language, obtaining the highest proficiency level. Decades later, she teaches the language as a volunteer. / Houston Chronicle

Ocala, FL
MARION SCHOOLS AMONG LEADERS IN INCLUSION EFFORTS FOR DEAF STUDENTS
First-grader Jarrod Stephens sat on a bench earlier this week just outside the South Ocala Elementary School cafeteria. He peered up at interpreter Dawn Christerson and grinned. Aided with a cochlear implant — a hearing device surgically placed in the head of a deaf person to give him some sense of hearing — Jarrod used sign language to answer questions about school life. Jarrod loves his first-grade teacher, Maggie McCraw. His favorite subject is physical education. / Ocala Star Banner


++++ADV+++++ADV+++++ADV++++

The Z™ offers the best in videophone technology, providing equipment options to meet customers' individual needs and offering features not available through other VRS providers. Professional, nationally certified interpreters follow standards of service excellence above and beyond FCC requirements. Dedicated to a spirit of innovation and commitment to excellence, The Z™ continues to set the industry standard as the nation's premier VRS provider. Go to www.zvrs.com for more information on all of our products, services and features. Don't have a Z phone? You can still join The Z™ Life by calling 888.888.1116 to connect to ZVRS from any videophone!

++++ADV+++++ADV+++++ADV++++



+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
++

New York, NY
HOW PROJECT RUNWAY IS GETTING DEAFNESS RIGHT
Watching Deaf people on television is often a dangerous proposition. That's especially true of reality television, which has never been known for its ability to transcend stereotypes. Most disabled people on these shows tend to be marginalized or placed in what TVTropes.org would call the “magical cripple” or “inspirationally disadvantaged” box, there to provide inspiring life wisdom but not to have their own story lines or relationships. So when I heard that this season of Project Runway was going to feature a Deaf designer, I knew it was must-see TV for me. / Vulture

See Also PROJECT RUNWAY'S JUSTIN LEBLANC AND THE STRENGTH OF DISABILITY / Advocate

Los Angeles, CA
CONCERT SIGN LANGUAGE INTERPRETER GETS INTO HER WORK
Meet Amber Galloway-Gallego. She’s a concert sign language interpreter who has lent her digit skills to more than 300 concerts. What is rather surprising (and entertaining) is Galloway-Gallego’s enthusiasm for hip hop. She literally appears to be rapping with her hands — and I like her flow! / UPTOWN Magazine

Seattle, WA
UW RESEARCHERS HELPING DEAF PEOPLE HEAR MUSIC
A research project at the University of Washington is helping hearing-impaired people hear music for the first time through improvements to cochlear implants. A cochlear implant is a small, electronic device that lets a person who is profoundly deaf or hard of hearing perceive sound. While the technology helps people to comprehend speech, it can be extremely difficult to hear music through a cochlear implant. But, UW scientists hope to change this. / KOMO News

Los Angeles, CA
LEAD ACTORS LIFT 'FLOWERS FOR ALGERNON' BY DEAF WEST
“Flowers for Algernon” certainly has traction. Daniel Keyes' 1959 short story about Charlie Gordon, a mentally disabled man transformed into a genius by a scientific experiment, has been subsequently adapted into a novel, a film and even a musical. Now, David Rogers' 1969 play has been mounted by the Deaf West company at the Whitefire Theatre in Sherman Oaks. The highly sentimentalized drama seems an unusual choice for Deaf West, and the production, which in typical Deaf West fashion utilizes both signing and voiced actors, does not always avoid bathos. / Los Angeles Times

Boston, MA
HOLY CROSS LECTURER RAISING AWARENESS OF DEAF CULTURE
John Pirone knows firsthand about the issues raised in the play "Tribes." As a deaf man, the 37-year-old Holy Cross ASL/deaf studies lecturer and interim director has dealt with them throughout his life. Now Pirone is helping to explain those deaf culture issues as a consultant on Nina Raine's 2010 play, now in its SpeakEasy Stage Company area premiere at the Boston Center for the Arts. "I am the educational resource provider, expanding extra ideas," he said in a recent interview. / Worcester Telegram & Gazette

Minneapolis, MN
'TRIBES' BEGINNING TONIGHT AT GUTHRIE THEATRE
The Guthrie Theater begins its production of Nina Raine's Tribes tonight, October 5. Winner of the 2012 Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Play and a 2010 Olivier Award nominee for Best Play, Tribes is a provocative, poignant family drama that illuminates the fascinating interplay of sound and communication, perception and true understanding. Wendy Goldberg (Guthrie: Dollhouse) directs this regional premiere that begins performances on the McGuire Proscenium Stage tonight. / Broadway World

New York, NY
DEAF GAMER CONNECTS, EDUCATES THROUGH WIZARD101
Even though she can't hear any of the music or sound effects in the game, Kelsey Fireheart professes a strong love for Wizard101. In a guest post on the KingsIsle blog, Kelsey shares a little of what it's like to be a deaf gamer and why this MMO means so much to her. / Joystiq

Washington, DC
HEARING LOOPS GIVE MUSIC BACK TO COMPOSER WHO WENT DEAF IN A DAY
Three years ago Richard Einhorn, an orchestra composer who reveled in the symphony and Broadway performances, went deaf – overnight. "It was horrifying," said Einhorn, 61, who lives in New York City and had sensory neural hearing loss caused by a virus. "One day, I felt like I had allergies, and my head was stuffed up and I couldn't hear well and was dizzy," he said. "The next morning my head was spinning with total vertigo and raging tinnitus. I knew immediately I was deaf in my right ear." / ABC News


+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
SPORTS
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Philadelphia, PA
RUGBY PLAYER NAVIGATES PENN LIFE, DEAF
Sophia Hu adeptly navigates the crowds of the Night Market in Chinatown, avoiding sloshing cups of beer. We are searching for ice cream to top off the night. This is when Sophia’s rugby skills become apparent, as she pushes through the throngs of people like she’s trying to score a goal against Princeton. What is not so apparent is that, in addition to being a sophomore at Penn, an athlete and a chemistry major, Sophia also happens to be deaf. / The Daily Pennsylvanian

Sulphur, OK
OKLA. SCHOOL FOR DEAF HELPING STUDENTS SHINE IN THE CLASSROOM AND ON THE FIELD
Whenever Head Coach, Tommy Varner, is standing on the sidelines during football games, he's doing more than just telling his team what plays they should run... He's also communicating with them through sign language. Varner is the coach of the Indians football team at the Oklahoma School for the Deaf, but he says his team is no different than any other high school football team. / KXII-TV

Waco, TX
DEAFNESS DOESN'T DETER UNIVERSITY HIGH RECEIVER
For all intents and purposes, Julian Locke is a normal young man. The University High School freshman likes to eat hamburgers and drink Big Red. He likes to wrestle with his father, and he’ll take the remote control away from him to put the television on ESPN if he doesn’t like what’s on. He’s also quite an athlete, having played select baseball and on the middle school basketball team. About the only thing that separates Locke from being just like everyone else is that he was born deaf. / Waco Tribune

Santa Rosa Beach, FL
SIGNS FROM THE SIDELINE: DEAF RUNNING BACK ZACH REESE HAS NO FEAR
When James Burns signals in a play from the sidelines, it's a necessity. It's imperative that Burns, an interpreter for the deaf, gets the right signal in to South Walton running back Zach Reese, who has been deaf since birth. Reese, a senior for the Seahawks, plays the game with no fear, going at every play head strong. / Walton Sun

Marlborough, MA
MARLBOROUGH RESIDENT ADVOCATES FOR DEAF ATHLETES
In February, many of the world’s most talented and gifted athletes will gather on the Black Sea coast in Sochi, Russia, for the 2014 Winter Olympics. This past July, a similar display occurred on a smaller scale when the Deaflympics took place in Sofia, Bulgaria, 89 years after its inaugural event in Paris. Though some may be unaware of the Deaflympics, Christopher Kaftan is not in that group. / Community Advocate


+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
EMPLOYMENT
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

You can advertise your job openings here for just $20 a week (up to 100 words, 10 cents each add'l word). To place your ad, send the announcement to mail@deafweekly.com.

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++


PAHrtners Deaf Services is Expanding to Pittsburgh

www.pahrtners.com/careers

www.facebook.com/deafjobs

NEW CAREER OPPORTUNITIES IN PITTSBURGH AND GLENSIDE

PAHrtners Deaf Services is a dynamic team of behavioral health professionals serving Deaf and Hard of Hearing children and adults. Located outside of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, PAHrtners provides residential and out-patient services to Deaf and Hard of Hearing (HoH) children, adolescents and adults. Over 85% of our staff members are Deaf or Hard of Hearing!

As a result of our commitment to the Deaf/HoH community PAHrtners is rapidly growing and expanding. Whether you are a high school graduate, recent college graduate or professional with many years of experience in the field of human services, we have a career-building position waiting for you! E.O.E.

PAHrtners is looking for dedicated, motivated, energetic individuals who are fluent in American Sign Language and knowledgeable in Deaf culture to fill the following positions:

-- ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT – Full Time; Glenside location
-- STAFF INTERPRETER – Full Time Position and Part Time Position; Glenside location
-- RESIDENTIAL PROGRAM DIRECTOR – Full Time; Glenside location
-- RESIDENTIAL CASE MANAGER – Full Time; Glenside and Pittsburgh locations
-- RESIDENTIAL COUNSELORS – Full Time, Part Time, On Call; Glenside and Pittsburgh locations
-- OFFICE MANAGER/INTERPRETER – Full Time; Pittsburgh location

Go to our Website at: www.PAHrtners.com to learn more about each position.
Like us on Facebook at: www.facebook.com/deafjobs

Send your letter of intent and resume to:

Linda Claypool, Office Manager/HR
PAHrtners Deaf Services
614 N. Easton Road
Glenside, PA 19038

Email: lclaypool@pahrtners.com
Fax: 215-884-6301; 215-884-9770 TTY/V

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Click here to subscribe or here to advertise.

Home | Subscribe | Current Issue | Back Issues | Advertise | Submit News
Links | About | Contact