deafweekly

 

July 25, 2012
Vol. 8, No. 37

Editor: Tom Willard

Deafweekly is an independent news report for the deaf and hard-of-hearing community that is mailed to subscribers on Wednesdays and available to read at www.deafweekly.com. These are the actual headlines and portions of recent deaf-related news articles, with links to the full story. Minor editing is done when necessary. Deafweekly is copyrighted 2012 and any unauthorized use is prohibited. Please support our advertisers; they make it possible for you to receive Deafweekly.

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NATIONAL
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Baton Rouge, LA
JAMES MIMS, 42, OF LOUISIANA SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF, DEAD FROM A GUNSHOT WOUND
Police spokesman Stubbs said officers arrived at 11:18 p.m. to find James Mims, 42, dead from a gunshot wound to the neck. A second man, who was identified as Troy Atkins, 37, was still alive late Tuesday but was suffering from life-threatening injuries at a local hospital. Atkins’ wife, Connie Atkins, said she had visited her husband in the hospital and that he was breathing on his own and was asking about his best friend, Mims. “I didn’t have the heart to tell him he was gone,” she said. Atkins said her husband and Mims had been best friends since high school, when they attended the Louisiana School for the Deaf. / The Advocate

Milwaukee, WI
FAMILY BURIES DEAF TEEN KILLED BY RANDOM GUNFIRE
More than a week after 17-year-old Dequon Carter was shot and killed in Milwaukee his family lays him to rest. The deaf teenager was standing outside a party at his father’s house when bullets were sprayed into the crowd. Friends at the funeral say they want to make sure Carter isn’t just another statistic. / FOX6now.com

Whitehaven, TN
DEAF MAN ACCUSED OF BURGLARY, CAUGHT BECAUSE OF LOUD NOISE
Sunday afternoon, a Whitehaven home became the scene of a crime in broad daylight, and the woman inside said she caught the accused burglar because he was so loud. According to a police affidavit, that could have been because the man is hearing impaired. According to Shelby County records, Curtis Brown has a criminal past with charges ranging from criminal trespass to domestic assault and possession of Marijuana. Right now, he is in jail on charges he broke into Kendryia Robinson’s house. / WREG

Houston, TX
DEAF MAN SAYS OFFICIALS GAVE HIM NO HELP
After a neighbor punched a deaf man in the face, Harris County prosecutors and constables refused to provide an interpreter to take his statement, but relied on his attacker's story to decline to press charges, the deaf man claims in Federal Court. Andrew Scofield, who is "completely deaf" and uses sign language, sued the Harris County District Attorney's Office and Precinct 4 Constables Office, alleging disability discrimination. / Courthouse News Service

Rochester, NY
DEAF COLLEGE AT RIT HELPS PRY OPEN HEALTH CARE FIELD
The “patient” complained of cold hands, muscle cramps and forgetfulness. He was feeling kind of puffy and lethargic. The dozen or so “doctors” fired off questions: Was he eating? Sleeping well? Did he have pain? They researched his symptoms and determined he had an underactive thyroid gland. This is what it’s like to be a doctor — a new idea to many of the deaf high school students from around the country at Explore Your Future. About 100 students are enrolled in session this week and next at National Technical Institute for the Deaf at Rochester Institute of Technology. / Democrat and Chronicle

Little Rock, AR
DEAF COMMUNITY HEARD AT SPECIAL MEETING
To serve as a sign language interpreter you really need to know sign language well. Some are convinced a woman hired by the state as an interpreter isn't up to the task. Call it damage control. Call it a search for common ground. Call it what you will…but the meeting called by State Work Force Director Bill Walker was his opportunity to explain an unpopular hiring decision to prominent members of Arkansas' deaf community. / KATV

See Also HORTON: HIRING AN UNQUALIFIED DEAF INTERPRETER CARRIES COST OF CRONYISM / Watchdog.org


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INTERNATIONAL
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Seoul, South Korea
'PLANET OF SNAIL,' A SOUTH KOREAN DOCUMENTARY
Young-chan, the soulful protagonist of the South Korean documentary “Planet of Snail,” is a young deaf and blind writer who compares his sense of isolation to that of an astronaut adrift in space. That feeling of being cut off persists despite the constant companionship of his wife, Soon-ho, whose spinal deformity has limited her height so that she barely reaches his waist. Soon-ho acts as his eyes and ears, and at moments they appear almost physically attached. / The New York Times

Manila, Philippines
DEAF COMMUNITY HOPES FOR GREATER USE OF INTERPRETERS
Noticeable about the sign language interpreters of GMA News Online’s live streaming of the President’s State of the Nation Address was their impressive skill set – they can simultaneously talk, interpret and sign. Although volunteer interpreters Catherine Joy Villareal and Reiner Blas cannot make a career out of interpreting, they said that they feel a need to bridge the gap between the “hearing world and the deaf world.” “If wala ang interpreter, wala ang bridge, they will not be able to know and get [the information] clearly,” said Villareal. / GMA News

London, England
DEAF AND DISABLED ARTISTS TAKE CENTRE STAGE
Imagine you are in Shakespeare’s globe theatre on a warm summer’s evening. Merrymakers line the South Bank, drinking, talking and laughing; across the river, St Paul’s cathedral towers above London’s skyline. But within the cylindrical walls you wouldn’t hear a pin drop. As soon as the performance starts, you are set apart from the rest of the audience as they react to what they hear onstage. All you can hear is a ringing silence. It might sound surreal, but this is what the 8.7m deaf people in the UK experience when they go to the theatre. / The Independent

London, England
'OUT OF NOWHERE I WAS DEAF.' HOW THOUSANDS ARE LOSING THEIR HEARING WITHOUT WARNING
Chris Cooper was shocked to be told that he had suffered sudden sensorineural hearing loss, or sudden deafness -- a condition which affects thousands of Britons each year, and which can occur without warning, affecting one or, as in Chris’s case, both ears. "All I wanted to know was when I’d get my hearing back. I assumed I’d just developed some illness that needed treatment. But the specialist told me it was unlikely it would ever return. I was devastated." / Daily Mail

London, England
THINGS THAT ONLY HAPPEN TO DEAF PEOPLE
Whether you’re a signer, a lipreader, a hearing aid wearer or a cochlear implant user, or maybe a bit of each of those (and some other things too), there are some things that truly only happen to a deaf person. Things that simply don’t happen to everyone else. Here’s the second part of my long-held list. How many have happened to you? / The Limping Chicken

Dublin, Ireland
MOONEY IN HUNT FOR HIDDEN HEROES FROM DEAF WORLD
Derek Mooney is on a search for heroes from the deaf community. The RTE broadcaster says too many celebrities get awards for no reason when there are hidden heroes everywhere. He is supporting Hidden Hearing, in partnership with the Irish Deaf Society, which wants nominations for people with hearing impairments for the 2012 Heroes Awards. / Herald

Winnipeg, AB, Canada
DEAF STUDENTS FIND NATURAL COMEDY OUTLET THROUGH MIME INSTRUCTION
He may be a born ham, but Christopher DeGuzman had no performing experience and no script to fall back on when he found himself onstage last month doing sketch comedy for an audience of hundreds of people. What the 25-year-old Winnipegger did have was a well-honed knack for delivering punchlines without words. "Using facial expressions and body language was easy. I think there's something innate about that for deaf people," DeGuzman said. / Winnipeg Free Press

Ottawa, ON, Canada
DEAF CATHOLICS CAN EVANGELIZE WHERE OTHERS CANNOT GO
The Church needs deaf Catholics and their gifts for they can reach people for the Gospel that only they can reach. That’s the message Archbishop Terrence Prendergast gave delegates at the 11th National Conference of the Canadian Section of the International Catholic Deaf Association in Ottawa July 9-14. He gave his massage at a special Mass where most of the participants responded in sign language and hymns were sung with hands. / The B.C. Catholic Paper

Auckland, New Zealand
SIGNS OF THE TIME
A small group is making a big noise in a world without sound. The South Auckland Deaf Club has re-formed and is filling a gap in the lives of those left out of hearing conversation. Club chairman Richard Peri wants to see more people embrace New Zealand Sign Language and te reo Maori. "We want to spread the message that New Zealand Sign Language is an official language. / Stuff.co.nz

Karachi, Pakistan
MUSICAL: 'I THOUGHT I WAS THE ONLY ONE IN THE WORLD'
Arshad Iqbal is a 17-year-old boy who recently discovered that he loves to play the drums. He has the knack to play the instrument, but he did not know it till students at the Nixor College helped him and other students at his school by giving summer lessons in drumming and theatre. Iqbal and his friends study at the Deaf Reach School. With the help of these college students, 20 DRS students performed “I Am”, a musical that tells the story of a deaf boy named Arshad, at the Pakistan American Cultural Centre’s Auditorium on Thursday afternoon. / The Express Tribune


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LIFE & LEISURE
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Awendaw, SC
FORMER DEAF CHILD SHARES HIS STORY WITH LAWMAKERS
Johnathan is a normal kid. He likes fishing and playing sports. It was at the age of 13, one year ago, that he first got to hear the sounds of all his favorite things. "You can hear the whole world outside," he said. MUSC Children's Hospital gave Johnathan the gift of hearing, with cochlear implants. It's not only changed his life but his 10-year-old brother, Sam's, too. "I just wanted my brother to hear, and be normal," he said. / ABC NEWS 4

San Francisco, CA
DEAF, BLIND MICE CURED OF VISION, HEARING LOSS
It's an exciting day for deaf, blind mice. Scientists are reporting success with treatments that seem to restore sight and hearing in mice born without those senses. A team of scientists from the University of California, San Francisco, set out to help hearing-impaired mice. The scientists used gene therapy to correct defects in tiny hair cells in the inner ear in mice that were born deaf. By injecting a gene, called VGLUT3, into the inner ears of the mice, the scientists were able to prompt the hair cells to send signals to the brain, restoring the mice's hearing. / ABC News

Fulton, MO
IS IT RIGHT FOR A NON-DEAF PROFESSIONAL TO CRITICIZE THE WAY A NATIVE DEAF ASL USER SIGNS?
You might not realize it, but for more than a century, many non-deaf professionals have had a goal to banish or at least control the use of ASL. They have used various approaches to accomplish this goal. Some have totally forbidden the use of ASL and the participation in deaf culture. Others make ASL off limits in the classroom, but allow limited exposure and use in non-school activities. A few have acknowledged the benefits of visual communication. / Fulton Sun

Greenville, NC
CARTERET COUNTY WOMAN ALMOST DEAF CAN HEAR AGAIN
A Carteret County woman who's been hard of hearing for the last 12 years can hear again. Nancy Marlette, 52, of Bogue had her cochlear implant activated on Tuesday at East Carolina University, and now she can enjoy all of her favorite sounds again: birds chirping, raindrops falling, and ocean waves crashing. / WNCT

Chicago, IL
DEAF LESBIAN FESTIVAL DRAWS GLOBAL ATTENDEES
Nearly 70 people attended this year's Deaf Lesbian Festival (DLF) held at Center on Halsted July 18-21. Attendees came from across the country and abroad for a weekend of workshops, entertainment and social gathering. This is the first year that the festival, now in its seventh year, has been held in the Midwest. The festival, which meets every two years in a new location, typically gathers between 50 and 200 attendees. / Windy City Times

Council Bluffs, IA
CAMP FOR DEAF LETS KIDS BE AT EASE WITH PEERS
The Iowa School for the Deaf's annual summer camp lets lots of kids just be kids for a week. Garrett Pryor, a Treynor, Iowa, seventh-grader at last week's camp, said he is the only student in his grade with a hearing loss. “The kids at school who don't know me treat me differently because of my hearing loss, and that's frustrating,” he said. “I'm not different here.” / Omaha World Herald

Cleveland, NC
CAMP TEACHES KIDS TO SIGN
After the first day of a sign language summer camp, Mattie Callahan was eager to show her parents what she’d learned – and hopefully score some dessert. “I told my dad ‘I love cookies’ in sign language, and it was really cool,” said Mattie, a student at West View Elementary School in the Cleveland community. Campers at Johnston Community College’s Cleveland Center spent last week immersed in the world of American Sign Language. / News & Observer


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WORKING WORLD
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Rochester, NY
CROWDSOURCING COULD HELP DEAF PEOPLE SUBTITLE THEIR EVERYDAY LIFE
Researchers from the University of Rochester have developed an app which allows deaf individuals to read subtitles that correspond to what's happening to them, in their day-to-day lives. The app, called Scribe, beams an audio track from the user's phone to a central server. From there, the system recruits workers from Amazon's Mechanical Turk crowdsourcing service. Each worker then hears the full audio stream from the user's phone, and is asked to transcribe what they hear. To make sure the results are accurate, the software uses some neat tricks. / Gizmodo

New Orleans, LA
LAW STUDENT RECEIVES FIRST SCHOLARSHIP FROM NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF THE DEAF
When an insurance company informed Lisa Bothwell as a child that she wouldn’t be allowed to take equestrian riding lessons anymore because she was deaf, it not only devastated her, but set her on a path to advocate for others with hearing and vision disabilities. This path has led Bothwell, a fourth-year law student at Loyola University New Orleans College of Law, to be the first recipient of the Nancy J. Bloch Leadership & Advocacy Scholarship from the National Association of the Deaf. / Loyola University

Staunton, VA
VIRGINIA SCHOOL FOR DEAF AND BLIND ISSUES RFP FOR 'FULL-SERVICE' MANAGER
Virginia School for the Deaf and the Blind, Staunton, is searching for a “full-service” money manager to manage its $3.8 million foundation, confirmed Michael Cathey, board member. The foundation is looking for a manager that will execute trades, and provide custodial services and investment advice to the board, Mr. Cathey said in a telephone interview. / Pensions & Investments


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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT
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Seattle, WA
DAN SAVAGE'S CAMPY 'MIRACLE!': A DELIGHT TO SOME, DRAG FOR OTHERS
At this summer's Intiman Theatre Festival, you can't miss a big sign posted in the Intiman Playhouse lobby. It states that "Miracle!," Dan Savage's irreverent redo of "The Miracle Worker," contains "disgusting language," "simulated sex acts" with "vulgar, nasty jokes" among other offenses. The sign is a warning, but also a promise. And a boast. Intiman has presented plays on gay themes before. But bending William Gibson's Helen Keller bio-drama into a raunchy drag burlesque? It's appalling to some. And a big hoot to others. / The Seattle Times

Atlanta, GA
THE PROJECTED IMAGE: A HISTORY OF DISABILITY IN FILM IN OCTOBER
Turner Classic Movies will dedicate the month of October to exploring the ways people with disabilities have been portrayed in film. On behalf of Inclusion in the Arts, Lawrence Carter-Long will join TCM host Robert Osborne for The Projected Image: A History of Disability in Film. The special month-long exploration will air Tuesdays in October, beginning Oct. 2 at 8 p.m. (ET). TCM makes today's announcement to coincide with the 22nd anniversary of the signing of the Americans with Disability Act on July 26. / TCM

Milwaukee, WI
NEW AUTOBIOGRAPHY EXPLORES ADAPTATION TO DISABILITIES
Author Ruth Silver presents her personal story of working through disability in her new autobiography “Invisible: My Journey Through Vision and Hearing Loss” (published by iUniverse). Through experiences both humorous and heartbreaking, Silver weaves a novel-like narrative of how she deals with the challenges of life, compounded by progressive vision and hearing losses. Silver’s very personal story reveals an individual’s ability to suffer blow upon blow, to stumble and tumble, and to rise again and again to strive toward the brighter tomorrow. / PRWeb

Internet
SONY'S ENTERTAINMENT ACCESS GLASSES PROVIDE PRIVATE CLOSED CAPTIONS FOR DEAF PEOPLE
We're smack in the middle of summer, which means there are plenty of blockbuster movies to choose from in theaters right now. If you're deaf, though, a trip to the movies can be frustrating. Not many theaters screen movies with closed captions, since most people without hearing problems would rather not see them. The only other option is usually to have a special ear piece on, but that only works if a person has any of their hearing left. Fortunately, Sony is outfitting certain theaters with its new Entertainment Access Glasses, which can display captions right in front of the wearer's eye that no one else can see. / Gizmag

Milwaukee, WI
HELLO TO ALL WHO HAVE EXPERIENCED MOVIE THEATRE CAPTIONING
Regardless where you live, please take a few minutes to fill out the movie access survey. Your reply can make a big difference to many people who want to watch movie entertainment as well as for your future generations. Your input really makes a difference even though if your location theaters do show captions on all movies at anytime. With the complete survey, we have “teeth” to prove that we do not have to put up with the movie industries that often refuse providing captions. / WAD


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SPORTS
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St. Peters, MO
MIKE BUSH BASEBALL CAMP FOR DEAF CHILDREN
Every summer on fields across America, the sounds of happy can be seen. The game of baseball brings joy to any kid that loves to hit or throw. But on these fields in St. Peters, it's also about opportunity and heart. This is the Mike Bush Fantasy Baseball Camp for the deaf and hard of hearing. "They're not singled out here. When they come to camp here they are just like everybody else, " explains Camp Director Cari Hampton. / KSDK

Frederick, MD
SIGNED IN: COACHES LEARN SIGN LANGUAGE TO HELP YOUNG SWIMMERS
Ask 6-year-old Faith Miller why the Spring Ridge Sharks swim team is different, and she'll say it's because of the games she plays and the fun she has. Ask her mother, Valerie Miller, the same question, and she'll say it's because Melissa Lapham, head coach, and Jen Dickson, assistant coach, learned a great deal of sign language to help her daughter and four other deaf swimmers be part of the team. "I'm really impressed with the coaching staff and the attitudes of all the kids," Miller said. / The Frederick News-Post


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MILESTONES
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Jasper, NY
KEITH M. HARRINGTON
Keith M. Harrington, 47, of Main St., Jasper, went to be with his Lord on Saturday afternoon, July 21, 2012 at home surrounded by his loving family. Keith was born in the Town of Urbana on Oct. 20, 1964. He was the son of the late Anna May Draper Walrath and Russell Walrath. He grew up in Jasper. Even though born deaf and later developing other physical disabilities, Keith lived a very happy and fulfilling life. He was educated at the Rochester School for the Deaf. / The Corning Leader


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EMPLOYMENT
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You can advertise your job openings here for just $20 a week (up to 100 words, 10 cents each add'l word). To place your ad, send the announcement to mail@deafweekly.com.

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POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT

Associate Director

THE OPPORTUNITY:

Telecommunications for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing, Inc. is seeking a talented and versatile professional for the position of Associate Director. The ideal candidate for this position will have a strong, clear commitment to expanding and diversifying TDI's revenue streams for its daily operations. Responsibilities include strategic plan implementation, operations planning and evaluation, project management, financial planning and monitoring, grant writing and fund-raising.

QUALIFICATIONS:

A Masters' Degree of Arts/Science is preferred. However, the candidate must possess at least a Bachelors of Arts/Science Degree in Business, Education, Human Resources, Management, Public Administration, Human Services or other related field.

Minimum of three years of job related work experience with demonstrated competence in the following areas: working with individuals who are deaf and hard of hearing, familiarity with the philanthropic process, budget development, program planning, grant writing, and non-profit or government management responsibility.

COMPENSATION:

TDI offers a competitive salary and customary benefits. The salary range for this position is $50,000-$60,000, depending on education and experience. TDI is an affirmative action/equal opportunity employer.

TO APPLY:

All applicants must submit a cover letter and resume electronically, which includes a list of at least three professional references and compensation requirements via email to TDI Executive Director Claude Stout at cstout@tdiforaccess.org. APPLICATIONS MUST BE RECEIVED BY 5PM ON OR BEFORE THE CLOSING DATE OF July 31, 2012.

TDI selects applicants for employment based on job related knowledge, skills and abilities without regard to race, color, gender, national origin, religion, age, disability, sexual orientation, or political affiliation.

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