deafweekly

 

April 13, 2005
Vol. 1 No. 26

Editor: Tom Willard

Deafweekly is an independent news report for the deaf and hard-of-hearing community. It is mailed to subscribers every Wednesday morning and available to read at www.deafweekly.com. For information, contact mail@deafweekly.com.

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The contents of Deafweekly are Copyright 2005. Any unauthorized use, including reprinting of news, is prohibited. Readership: approximately 4,000 including subscribers and website readers.

Please support our advertisers; they make it possible for you to receive this newsletter at no charge. For advertising information, see www.deafweekly.com/advertise.htm.


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NATIONAL
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MONTANA MOM WELCOMES SON HOME FROM IRAQ FOR TWO-WEEK LEAVE

A soldier on two-week leave from Iraq enjoyed his trip home to Great Falls, Mont., but his mother enjoyed it even more. "Since I'm deaf, I don't get to hear his voice" on the telephone, Laura Braille (Bray-LEE) told the Great Falls Tribune. Pfc. Ben Braille of the 163rd Infantry Battalion has been serving in Iraq together with his father, Frank Braille, since November. Another son, Tony, is a member of the Air National Guard and reports for basic training in June. "It's not going to be easy for me as a mother, knowing that my men are gone," she said. "But I have to be strong because I know they'll be back and things will get back to normal soon."

FLORIDA SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF STUDENT ARRESTED FOR BURGLARY, BATTERY

WFTV Channel 9 News reported Monday from Maitland, Fla., where Robert Curry, an honor student and athlete at the Florida School for the Deaf and Blind in St. Augustine, was in police custody for burglary and battery. Curry was arrested by Maitland police for attacking a woman in her home, and he is believed to be a suspect in a second attack. DNA test results were being awaited to see if Curry is also involved with a sexual attack that took place last week. The teen's lawyer insists he is innocent of both charges.

FLORIDIAN GETS 270 DAYS IN JAIL FOR PUNCHING DEAF WOMAN

Jeanne Shapiro, 49, was sentenced to 270 days in jail, plus probation, for punching a 71-year-old deaf woman outside a restaurant in Tamarac, Fla. The incident occurred in November 2003 after Shapiro objected to the presence of Jean Costanza Sala's hearing dog in the restaurant. According to Local 10.com of Broward County, Fla., Shapiro punched Sala in the mouth with a closed fist, splitting the older woman's lip open. Shapiro was convicted in March of battery on a person over 65, a third-degree felony, and could have received up to five years in prison.

YAHOO SHUTS DOWN USA-L NEWS, SERVICE FINDS NEW HOME

The deaf news service USA-L News was shut down by its sponsor, Yahoo Groups, early last week. An Internet search for the longtime group brings up a message from Yahoo claiming “There is no group called USA-L News.” Founder Phil Moos of New Jersey tried to get an answer from Yahoo as to why USA-L News was removed, but he said, "Yahoo claims they are not obligated to give reasons for doing so." Moos started his service, which sends out deaf-related news items on a daily basis, in 1996 and had nearly 5,000 subscribers. Moos said USA-L News will resume by the end of the week on www.deaftimes.com, and he has an older list of subscribers that he will use to rebuild the mailing list.

BROWN UNIVERSITY SAID TO BE SHUTTING DOWN ASL PROGRAM

Brown University in Providence, R.I. is reportedly shutting down its American Sign Language program. The program offers four levels and is in great demand, said activist Adee Thal in an email circulating on the Internet. A group of concerned students were planning to meet soon with university president Paul Armstrong and hope to bring a stack of letters supporting the program. "I think this is much more personal than a petition," said Thal, who encouraged supporters to write to her at wouncer@hotmail.com or Armstrong at Paul_Armstrong@brown.edu.

MOTORCYCLIST CHARGED AFTER HIT-AND-RUN ACCIDENT

A deaf motorcyclist from Springfield, Mass. was charged with motor vehicle violations by three different police departments after a hit-and-run accident March 25 that left a pedestrian in critical condition. According to the Worcester Telegram & Gazette, Gilbert Ortiz, 37, was arrested by Auburn police in Oxford after a foot pursuit and charged with speeding, failing to slow for a pedestrian, operating to endanger, leaving the scene of a personal injury accident, operating without a license and driving an unregistered and uninsured motor vehicle. Auburn and Oxford police added their own minor motor vehicle charges. Robert Adams, 30, the man hit by the motorcycle, was sent to a hospital with multiple blunt trauma injuries and remained in critical condition in the intensive care unit.

HIGH SCHOOL STUDENT LUNCHES WITH FLORIDA GOV. JEB BUSH

Gov. Jeb Bush of Florida spent April 1 having lunch and meeting with high school juniors from across the state who were chosen for the Governor's All Stars program. Among them was Adam Bondurant, 16, a deaf student at Central High School in the Pensacola Bay area. Adam was excited but nervous about meeting the governor, reported The Pensacola News Journal, and he was accompanied by his mother, Becky, an interpreter at Central High. Adam was nominated by his school principal, Kenny Owens, who said that he never uses his hearing disability as an excuse. "He's a super kid and the most organized student I've ever seen," said Owens. "He's what you want every kid to be."

DELAWARE SCHOOL DIRECTOR CITES SEVERAL REASONS TO BUILD NEW SCHOOL

It could be time for Delaware to replace the state school for the deaf's 36-year-old building in Ogletown, said school director Edward Bosso Jr. in The News Journal March 19. Named for Margaret S. Sterck, the school has grown old before its time because of changing technology and demographics, he said. Students with cochlear implants, for example, have different learning needs that the school is ill equipped to handle. Eight of 157 students have implants, and the number is expected to grow due to a partnership between the school and a hospital that does implant surgery. Students are also coming to the school at an earlier age, thanks to newborn hearing screening, which adds to the need for new facilities. A new building would also be better attuned to the needs of deaf students, with alerting systems designed into the facilities. It is estimated that a new school would cost as much as $25 million to construct, but "They've pretty much convinced me" of the need, said Martha Brooks of the state education department.

PITTSBURGH HOSPITAL RESPONDS TO WOMAN'S ACCESSIBILITY COMPLAINT

A hard-of-hearing Pittsburgh woman had to wait four hours in a hospital emergency room to be treated for a minor illness because she and the staff could not communicate, the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reported recently. Afterwards, the unidentified woman complained to administrators at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center's Presbyterian Hospital. "We listened and researched the problem," said Laurie Rack, who handles patient relations for the hospital. "We found that we had a lot of the equipment we needed, but few knew how to use it. We discovered that we had TTY telephones, closed caption television and even access to interpreters. We just had to educate the staff and our patients." The incident happened about a year ago, and today there are TTYs installed throughout the hospital. But it barely scratches the surface, said Dr. Kimberly Mathos, a clinical assistant professor at UPMC. "We have a good health system in Pittsburgh except for the deaf and hard-of-hearing," she said.


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INTERNATIONAL
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KELLY DUFFIN RETURNS TO TOP SPOT WITH CANADIAN HEARING SOCIETY

Kelly Duffin returns to her job today as President and CEO of the Canadian Hearing Society, two years after she was first hired and five months after being fired in a controversial and ultimately fatal move by the society’s board of directors. Duffin's termination on Nov. 5, 2004 led to the founding of the Friends of the CHS, a community advocacy group that used the society's own bylaws to force an early membership meeting. At the meeting, held Jan. 29 in Toronto, 87% of members voted to remove the entire board. They went on to approve a slate of 15 new board members carefully chosen in advance by the Friends. Board chair Kristin Snoddon said in a recent statement that an independent review of the circumstances surrounding Duffin's dismissal last year "found no impediment to her reinstatement." She thanked Ron Aldridge, interim president and CEO, who "in his short time in this position ... gained the respect and admiration of those who have worked with him."

HELICOPTER RESCUES SIX ISRAELIS BLOCKED BY REBELS IN NEPAL

Six deaf Israeli citizens were rescued by helicopter after become trapped in Nepal in an area that is controlled by Maoist rebels, Ynet News reported April 4. The travelers were able to get help from the Israeli embassy in Nepal through another traveler who acted as an intermediary. Israeli Counsel Meir Levi arranged for an insurance company called Clal Israeli to sponsor the local helicopter that took on the mission. "Nothing happened to the tourists, but they were in a very unpleasant situation," said a Clal official. "It is clear why they wished to leave the area."

CHINESE TROUPE'S DEAF DANCERS SUE UNDERWEAR GIANT

The China Disabled Person's Performing Art Troupe, mentioned two weeks ago in Deafweekly, made headlines again last Thursday when they took legal action against other performers and a leading Chinese underwear maker. According to China Daily, the legal action centers around the Thousand-Hand Guanyin, or Goddess of Mercy dance, which is performed by deaf members of the troupe. After the troupe performed on TV Feb. 8, five other dance troupes began copying their moves, the suit alleges. At the same time, underwear maker Gracewell is applying for a patent for a stocking package design that features an Indian woman in a pose said to be similar to one struck by the deaf troupe's dancers. The underwear company was "trampling the culture of Guanyin and smirching noble feelings of the Chinese," said artistic supervisor Wang Yuan.

MOVIE 'BLACK' CALLS ATTENTION TO NEEDS OF INDIAN DEAF

The movie "Black" has called attention to the need for a universal sign language in India, Ahmedabad Newsline reported last week. The film has also spurred a Vadodara deaf association, Mook Badhir Mandal, into action, with the group now demanding government support for a redesign of Indian sign language and publication of a picture dictionary that could be used to teach sign language across the country. Deaf Indians use a variety of regional sign language, but the popularity of Black has raised awareness and encouraged the deaf group to demand that government focus on problems with deaf education rather than satisfy itself by giving the film a national award.

COUNCIL RAISES RENT, HELPS DEAF CLUB FIND NEW HOME

Deaf people in Sheffield, Yorkshire have a new club after two years of uncertainty about the future. In 2003 the Sheffield Council raised the rent from 18,000 to 30,000 pounds, claiming that the deaf club, which had occupied the space 20 years, was in a high-rent district. Although the council offered to pay the additional rent for one year, more than 5,000 people signed a petition protesting the rent hike. But now council leaders have offered the deaf club new premises at Shude Hill, says the Yorkshire Post Today, and the move is welcomed by members. It's "in a great location with excellent transport links," said a club official, and more in line with Disability Discrimination Act requirements. "The deaf club can look forward to many happy years at their new location and I wish them every success," said Council leader Jan Wilson.

DEAF MUGGING VICTIM REPORTS CRIME TO SIGNING POLICE OFFICER

A deaf U.K. man was mugged by two Asian men while waiting for a bus las week. The 25-year-old victim, unidentified in a Hamhigh.co.uk news report, was befriended by the two suspects and led to a nearby street, where he was punched and kicked and had a tooth knocked out. His hearing aid was smashed. Shortly after the attack, the bloodied victim came upon two police officers and was able to recount the mugging because one of the officers knows sign language. He was taken to a hospital for treatment and released shortly afterwards. It "must have been of great comfort to the victim" that the police officer could sign, said Linda Isaac of the Royal Association for Deaf People. "This is a great example of how deaf awareness training and basic skills can make a huge difference in an emergency," she said.

GROUP OF 30 PROTEST OUTSIDE POLICE HEADQUARTERS IN INDIA

A group of about 30 deaf citizens protested outside the Delhi Police Headquarters in India last Friday on behalf of Anuj Kumar, 19, a deaf man with speech and hearing disabilities. The protesters alleged that Anuj is being tortured while in police custody on vehicle theft and robbery charges. M.S. Farmer, Anuj's father, was among the protesters and said his son is being "brutally tortured" inside the police station. At one point, he said, Anuj was unable to walk for several days as a result of the assaults. According to Delhi Newsline, police dismissed the allegations and said that two separate investigations had found Anuj was involved with the crimes.

AUSTRALIANS FIND IT WORTH THE WAIT FOR CAPTIONED 'POLAR EXPRESS'

An open-captioned version of The Polar Express that was shown last weekend at Australia Cinema wasn't easy to come by, reported Central Western Daily. Australia Cinema supervisor Ross Menzies said the film was released in December but most films have only four captioned versions nationally and "we've had to wait in line for this one." But it's been worth the wait, said Central West deaf community president Kathy Hayward, who was pictured outside the theater with her husband and daughter "waiting for the Polar Express to arrive." Said Hayward: "It's a dream come true for the deaf community. We can laugh and cry and get involved in the emotion of the characters."


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LIFE & LEISURE
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WEST VIRGINIA WOMAN SIGNS UP FOR 3-DAY WALK FOR BREAST CANCER

Carolyn Hancock, a deaf woman from Wheeling, W.V., plans to walk 20 miles over three days, joining thousands of other people in cities across the country walking to raise money to fight breast cancer. Hancock, wife and mother of two who works part-time as a financial assistant, is registered to participate in the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation's walking event Sept. 16-18 in Chicago. It is one of 12 such walks that take place in major U.S. cities from May to October. "I am going to Chicago to honor two cousins who had the disease," she told The Intelligencer, and two friends from Wheeling will accompany her on the trip. Hancock's goal is to raise $2,500 from the walk, and so far she has $1,400 in pledges. Anyone who wants to help can get a donation form at www.The3Day.org. Fill it out and mail it to Breast Cancer 3-Day, 7610 Paysphere Circle, Chicago, IL 60674; be sure to include Carolyn Hancock's name and ID number: 56675170.

COCHLEAR IMPLANT PIONEER HONORED WITH NAMING OF NEW CENTER

Australian cochlear implant pioneer Graeme Clark was surprised to learn at the opening of a research facility Monday that it had been named in his honor: the Graeme Clark Medical and Hearing Science Centre. According to The Australian, the federal government is giving $4.4 million to fund the center and Clark is donating a $232,000 prize he won last year, but an additional $27 million is still needed to fund the research (all figures in US dollars). Clark has devoted 38 years to helping deaf people understand speech, and Monday's ceremony attracted several cochlear implant recipients, ranging in age from Rod Saunders, 73, who had an implant in 1978, to Jasmine Wong, 2, a recent implantee. The center is working on a new generation of bionic ears using electrodes coated in "smart plastic," which contains growth factors that encourage hearing nerve cells to resprout. Researchers hope to adapt the technology to help paralyzed people regenerate nerves in their spine, as well as epileptics who do not gain relief from medications.

STEM CELL RESEARCH OFFERS PROMISE OF DEAFNESS REVERSAL

Deaf people may soon be able to hear again, Life News reported last week, thanks to Indiana University medical researchers who are working on a way to restore hearing to deaf patients using their own bone marrow cells. The team has shown that it can transform stem cells taken from adult bone marrow into cells similar to those located in the ear. Known as marrow stromal cells, these cells lead to the development of fat, bone and cartilage. The study was published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, and the group is now trying to determine if the cells can be transplanted into the inner ear of deaf people to stimulate the growth of the nerve cells needed to hear.

DEAF HIGH SCHOOL STUDENT CROWNED DAFFODIL QUEEN IN TACOMA, WASH.

Jessica DeWitt, a deaf student at Mount Tacoma (Wash.) High School, was chosen 2005 Daffodil Queen April 1 at Tacoma's Church of All Nations. A crowd was on hand from the deaf community to support Jessica as she gave her speeches in ASL, reported The Dispatch of Eatonville, Wash. Jessica was one of 20 competitors, each evaluated on interviews, a prepared speech, an impromptu question, festival awareness, academic standing, personality, good appearance and sociability. The festival, in its 72nd year, awards scholarships from $6,000 for the queen to $1,000 for others.

SCHOOL BOARD IN MICHIGAN CONSIDERS SUMMER SIGN LANGUAGE CAMP

Board of Education officials in Plainfield Township, Mich. are scheduled to vote on a summer camp that would teach sign language to hearing children, the Grand Rapids Press reported last week. The two-week camp would be organized by Northview's deaf and hard-of-hearing program. Students would be divided by age and work with volunteer teachers, with a possible field trip the second week. The camp would offer community outreach and better acceptance of ASL, said program director Robert Anthony. The camp would take place mornings from Monday to Friday and cost $115 per camper. With an estimated 65 campers, the program would produce a profit of $3,305 for deaf and hard-of-hearing programs. But if only 40 youngsters sign up, it would still break even.

MEDICARE TO EXPAND COVERAGE FOR COCHLEAR IMPLANTS

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services announced April 5 that it is expanding Medicare coverage for cochlear implant devices used to treat severe hearing loss, AHA News Now reported last week. The agency will now pay for cochlear implants for patients who get test scores of 40% or less on a sentence recognition test, or scores between 40% and 60% in patients participating in a clinical trial who meet the requirements outlined in the decision.


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WORKING WORLD
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SONY PATENTS DEVICE THAT 'COULD GIVE DEAF THE CHANCE TO HEAR'

A device recently patented by Sony "could give blind or deaf people the chance to see or hear," says a report in New Scientist magazine. The device "fires pulses of ultrasound at the head to modify firing patterns in targeted parts of the brain with results ranging from moving images to tastes and sounds," said the report. Independent experts found merit in the idea. "I looked at it and found it plausible," said Niels Birbaumer of the University of Tubinger in Germany. But Elizabeth Boukis, a Sony spokeswoman, said the work is speculative, "based on an inspiration that this may someday be the direction that technology will take us."

REAL-TIME CAPTIONING SOFTWARE DEMONSTRATED AT CONNECTICUT COLLEGE

A new software called Caption Mic could usher in "a new era of understanding," reported the Republican-American last week. Captioning is nothing new, the newspaper noted, but Caption Mic is a voice recognition system that allows for real-time captioning whereas most captioning is derived from a script. The software, developed by Middlebury-based ULTECH LLC, was demonstrated April 4 at Northwestern Connecticut Community College in Winsted by professor Maureen Chalmers, who repeated other people's words into a "muzzle-like microphone." Almost immediately, student Beth Hoyer read the words in large, white text on a black computer screen. Hoyer, 27, who hasn't mastered sign language and finds it difficult to follow along in class, said the new software helps her "understand what's going on."

MINNESOTA STUDENTS WIN GRANT TO STUDY RESTAURANT EXPERIENCE

Three deaf students from Minnesota North Star Academy in St. Paul have received a $2430 grant from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation to do a research study called "How to Make Restaurants More Deaf-Friendly." Alex Jacobson, Aaron Klein and Jenny Williams are conducting over 100 surveys and interviewing restaurant managers and deaf patrons, with a goal of making the restaurant experience more pleasurable for deaf individuals. The students are working with a community partner, T.G.I.Friday's restaurants, to train employees to work with deaf customers. It's a win-win situation, said Jacobson: "The deaf customers get better service and the restaurants that receive training will have more deaf customers and in turn will make more money."

FIVE STUDENT POETS FROM NTID TO VISIT JAPAN IN MAY

Five student poets from the National Technical Institute for the Deaf will visit Japan in May as winners of the Robert F. Panara Haiku/Tanka Competition. They are Stephen McDonald, Sam Sepah, Jessica Thurber, Jack Williams and Christopher Zahniel. A record 244 poems were entered by 28 NTID students in this year's competition, formed in 2000 to honor Panara, NTID's first deaf faculty member who retired in 1988. The annual contest is sponsored by the Postsecondary Education Network-International (PEN-International, a grant program based at NTID that aims to share modern technology with deaf students around the world. The competition is open only to students from NTID and Japan's Tsukuba College of Technology. The Japanese college sent its five winners and four teachers to NTID in March, and will welcome NTID's winners to Japan next month.


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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT
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NEW DOCUMENTARY FOLLOWS ARTIST AS HE DEALS WITH DEAFNESS

A new documentary on renowned artist David Hockney made its debut earlier this month at New York's Film Forum. "David Hockney: The Colors of Music" follows the artist around for several years as he designs sets and costumes for international opera productions. According to the Hollywood Reporter, the film's principal dramatic element is Hockney's growing deafness. A longtime lover of opera and classical music, British-born Hockney, now a Los Angeles resident, had to give up the effort around 1993 due to hearing loss. Hockney "is indeed a colorful, engaging character and his stage designs are consistently delightful," wrote critic Frank Scheck, but the film "doesn't fully convey the essence of its titular subject."

'MIRACLE WORKER' DIRECTOR INSPIRED BY GROWING UP WITH A DEAF MOM

"It was difficult to live in a society that doesn't really recognize the deaf community," said David Rodgers Jr., "and that's why now I'm dedicating this show to my mother." The show is "The Miracle Worker," the story of Helen Keller and her attempts to communicate with the world, and the director is Rodgers. The play is running now through April 24 at the Missouri Street Theatre in Fairfield, Calif. Rodgers drew heavily on his past, in which he grew up with a deaf mother and learned to sign as his first language. He drew inspiration from the recent Deaf West Theatre adaptation of "Big River," he told the Daily Republic. "It inspired me to try new things to involve the deaf community into live theatre," he said. "They shouldn't be excluded from such a wonderful thing."

TAMPA, FLORIDA TO HOST SECOND ANNUAL FILM & ARTS FESTIVAL

Plans have been announced for Florida's second annual International Deaf Film and Visual Arts Festival, to be held May 12-14 in Tampa. Hillsborough Community College's Dale Mabry Campus will be the site of the festival, and participants will enjoy feature length and experimental short films made by deaf filmmakers; visual art displays; and stage performances by the National Theatre of the Deaf and Fred Michael Beam and the Wild Zappers. Check out the show times at www.floridadeaffilmfestival.com/schedule1.htm.


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SPORTS
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ARM WRESTLER RETURNS TO COMPETITION AFTER THREE YEARS OF RETIREMENT

The Casper (Wyo.) Star-Tribune did a story recently on John Shipes, a 47-year-old deaf arm wrestler who competes almost every weekend and brings home trophies every time. The 5-foot-6 Shipes weighs about 225 pounds and wrestles with both his right and left hands. Shipes wrestled in junior and high school and entered his first arm wrestling contest in 1980. He continued to compete until a 1987 car accident almost killed him. It was seven years before he competed again, in 1994 at the Washington state championships where he took two trophies. He continued to compete until 2000, when he decided to quit and move to Wyoming. But the old urge to compete resurfaced and in 2003 he began training and entering tournaments again. His new goal? "To climb to the top ranks in the U.S. to show that the deaf can do it."

SKI INSTRUCTOR RECALLS TEACHING LARGE GROUP OF DEAF STUDENTS

Joy Lucas of Edmonds, Wash. recounted her experience teaching a large group of deaf students to ski in the Vail (Colo.) Daily News last week. To make it easier to follow directions, it was agreed that she would stand below the group and use her hands to direct them. Everything was fine until one student made a wrong move and Lucas, sensing disaster, frantically clasped her hands together while repeatedly spreading her elbows. "To make sure that he could see me, I began marching back and forth, flapping my wings," she wrote. She learned later that a witness to the commotion remarked, "I've taken a lot of lessons from that instructor, but she never taught me the Funky Chicken!"


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COMING EVENTS
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NATIVE AMERICAN FESTIVAL ROLLS OUT RED CARPET FOR DEAF VISITORS

A music and dance festival in upstate New York in July is rolling out the red carpet for deaf and hard-of-hearing visitors. The 14th annual Native American Dance & Music Festival "Earth Rhythm and Beats II" is set for July 23-24 at Ganondagan State Historic Site in Victor, N.Y. The festival, representing many indigenous cultures, features an art market, storytelling, crafts demonstrations, children's and family activities and Native American foods. Interpreters will be at each performance and are available to accompany hearing-impaired visitors to various activities. Balloons will be provided so people can feel the vibrations of drumming and rhythm. For more information, visit the website at www.ganondagan.org or write to friends@frontiernet.net.

CROTCHED MOUNTAIN SCHOOL TO CELEBRATE 50TH ANNIVERSARY

The Crotched Mountain School for the Deaf in Greenfield, N.H. is sponsoring "A Day to Remember ... 1955-2005 ... 50th Anniversary Celebration." Organizers say it's "a perfect time for you and your family to reunite with your classmates, friends, administrators, teachers and counselors." The reunion takes place Saturday, July 23 at the Crotched Mountain Rehabilitation Center. Write to Bill Case at wjwekcase@comcast.net for more information.


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EMPLOYMENT
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JOB OPPORTUNITIES @ GLAD

GLAD is an Affirmative Action Employer with equal opportunity for men, women and people with disabilities.
For more information on the following positions, go to: www.gladinc.org
Status of all positions is: Regular, Full-time, Non-Exempt, Full Fringe Benefits unless otherwise noted.
All positions are open until filled. Revised 4/06/05

HUMAN RESOURCES SPECIALIST in Los Angeles
Brief Summary: Under the supervision of the CEO, the Human Resources Specialist will be responsible for administration of employee benefits including health, dental, vision, and pension plan; Recruit, interview and hire all GLAD personnel; Conduct new employee orientation; Prepare job announcements, duty statements, and all employment related correspondence; Assist in the maintenance, administration, and development of personnel policies and the Employee Handbook; Provide training and workshops in areas related to Human Resources matters to managers; Act as custodian of records and maintain records of employment related materials and personnel files….

DIRECTOR OF LIFESIGNS in Los Angeles
Brief Summary: Under the direction of the CEO, the Director of LIFESIGNS will be responsible for planning and supervising the day-to-day activities of the office, including the provision of training, mentorship and supervision to staff. The Director will attends and participate in a wide range of activities promoting and marketing LIFESIGNS to the local community; participate in board meetings; handle all incoming and outgoing correspondence, interpreting contracts and bids with the CEO; prepare reports for funding sources; and attend public workshops, which benefit the agency….

COMMUNITY HEALTH EDUCATOR in Los Angeles
Brief Summary: Under supervision of the Director of Health Education/Services, using the guidelines of the assigned scope of work provided by the California Department of Health Services' Community Challenge Grant, the Community Health Educator (CHE) will provide teenage pregnancy prevention and education services to deaf and hard of hearing adolescents, young adults, and parents in Los Angeles County using the 8-hour "be cool…sign no to sex" curriculum; perform all duties and tasks as outlined in the program scope of work; conduct individual and group sessions and events to target groups….

HIV PROGRAM INTERPRETER in Los Angeles
Brief Summary: Under the supervision of the Director of Health/Education Services, the HIV Program Interpreter will perform all duties and tasks as outlined in the AESD program scope of work, interpret initial HIV antibody test and results, update and maintain a pool of qualified HIV-trained interpreters to assist with interpreting assignments, interpret and coordinate interpreter services to deaf and hard of hearing consumers with HIV/AIDS ….

JOB DEVELOPMENT COORDINATOR in Rancho Cucamonga, Norwalk, Anaheim
Brief Summary: Under the supervision of the EDD Program Manager, the Placement Coordinator will supervise the Job Developer/Interpreter, provide assistance with Job Development/Placement efforts; work in conjunction with traditional employment resources, develop employment opportunities, identify openings and opportunities for clients in need of employment assistance; perform other duties including job interview preparation assistance, job counseling….

JOB DEVELOPER/INTERPRETER in West Covina, Crenshaw, Rancho Cucamonga, Norwalk, Anaheim
Brief Summary: Under the direction of the Coordinator, the Job Developer/Interpreter will provide assistance with Job Development/Placement efforts, work in conjunction with traditional employment resources, develop employment opportunities, identify openings and opportunities for clients in need of employment assistance, other duties include job interviews, job counseling to clients and employers…

COMMUNITY ADVOCATE in Los Angeles
Brief Summary: Under the direction of the Human Services Director, the Community Advocate will assist deaf and hard of hearing consumers in the area of communication access via TTY relay, document translation, and other duties, provide advocacy in the areas of social security, education, employment, consumer affairs, and others, record statistics on a daily basis related to provision of services, counsel deaf and hard of hearing consumers with problems related to personal and family adjustments, finances, employment, food, clothing and housing….

Susan Grey Snapp
Director of Human Resources and LIFESIGNS, Inc.

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