deafweekly

 

April 6, 2005
Vol. 1 No. 25

Editor: Tom Willard

Deafweekly is an independent news report for the deaf and hard-of-hearing community. It is mailed to subscribers every Wednesday morning and available to read at www.deafweekly.com. For information, contact mail@deafweekly.com.

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NATIONAL
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NEW YORK CITY COUPLE FOUND DEAD AT HOME, VICTIMS OF CARBON MONOXIDE POISONING

A hearing-impaired Queens, N.Y. couple were found dead in their home last week, apparent victims of accidental carbon monoxide poisoning. Blair Mazin, 50, and his wife, Anita, 49, were found in their bedclothes by the woman's brother in their townhouse, the New York Post reported. Their car was in the garage with an empty gas tank and the ignition key in the "on" position. Police believe that the victims did not hear the car running or the alarm from the carbon-monoxide detector. A law went into effect in November requiring all city residents to install carbon-monoxide alarms. Blair Mazin, an accountant, was president of the South Nassau, N.Y. chapter of Self Help for Hard of Hearing People; his wife was a teacher and counselor for the city. Neighbors of the couple were stunned. "I can't believe it," said one. "It's very quiet here."

SEARCH CALLED OFF FOR DEAF FISHERMAN THROWN FROM BOAT

Johnny Wayne Brown, 36, was presumed dead after the U.S. Coast Guard suspended its search for the Conway, S.C. man, thrown from a fishing boat by a wave Saturday morning. Brown was on the 50-foot Tracy Lynn with his brother-in-law and a third man when a 30- to 40-foot wave "just disintegrated the boat," said Brown's sister, Laura Abernathy. One man was rescued by a container ship and another was located within an hour by a Coast Guard helicopter, but a search for Brown proved unsuccessful. A South Carolina School for the Deaf graduate who was supposed to get married June 11, Brown "was a ray of sunshine," said his sister-in-law, Berly Brown.

FORMER VIRGINIA SCHOOL INTERPRETER KILLED IN ALASKA CAR ACCIDENT

Darlene Swindell, who moved from Virginia to Alaska last June with her husband, Bubba, to be closer to her children and grandchildren, was killed instantly coming home from work one day last month when her car skidded on some ice, hit another car and careened down a ravine. Swindell was a certified interpreter who taught herself sign language after her middle son, Danny, was born deaf. She interpreted for public schools and worked for the Virginia Office for Protection and Advocacy, where "she was the computer whiz who set up the office" and helped with investigations, a colleague said. Swindell's children moved to Alaska 20 years and she often visited, vowing to move out there "one day." The chance came last summer when the Swindells received an unexpected offer on the old house they had restored.

POLICE IN KNOXVILLE, TENN. TRY TO IDENTIFY AMNESIAC DEAF WOMAN

The Knoxville (Tenn.) News Sentinel reported Saturday on efforts by police to identify a deaf woman who cannot remember her name or details of her past. She was described as white, 45-60 years old, 5-feet-4, weighing about 200 pounds. She has short, brownish-gray, thinning hair and is missing back teeth. She has a hysterectomy scar and no tattoos, but multiple scars along her arms. She may have a child named David and may be married. Police did not release her photograph. Anyone with information is asked to call A.J. Loeffler at 865-215-7206.

UTAH TEACHER SAYS SHE IS INNOCENT OF STUDENT ABUSE

A former teacher at the Utah Schools for the Deaf and the Blind said through her attorney last week that she is innocent of allegations that she abused five students. The 27-year-old hearing-impaired teacher was not identified in a Standard-Examiner article because she has not been charged with an offense, but her attorney questioned her accusers' motivations. "Some of the people interviewed have an ax to grind," said Michael McCoy, an attorney with the Utah Education Association. The teacher was investigated by the state Division of Child and Family Services after reports that she hit students, yanked their arms, slammed them into chairs and restrained them with her legs. DCFS referred the case to the local sheriff's office, which declined to say if it was investigating.

FIREFIGHTER IN CALIFORNIA SUES CITY, CLAIMING ADA VIOLATION

Firefighter Timothy Thalken is suing his employer, the city of Lodi, Calif., for violating the Americans with Disabilities Act. According to The Record, Thalken claims he was prevented from returning to his firefighting job after surgery in August 2003 left him deaf in his right ear. He also claims that he was reassigned to a desk job for more than a year after being cleared by his doctor to return to work. The city finally returned him to the front-lines on Feb. 28. Thalken's suit, filed March 15 in federal court in Sacramento, seeks attorney and expert fees, lost overtime pay and unspecified damages. Although officials refuse to buy a special $500 helmet to amplify his hearing, Thalken can still perform his job duties, said his attorney, Patricia Kramer. "We want the public to know that if they're crying for help, he can hear them," she said.

GOVERNMENT DROPS DEPORTATION PROCEEDINGS AGAINST OHLONE COLLEGE INTERPRETER

Gerardo Dulalia emerged from a San Francisco immigration hearing Friday smiling and a free man, reported The Mercury News of San Jose, Calif. Dulalia, a Filipino immigrant and deaf interpreter at Ohlone College in Fremont, came to the U.S. in 1987 on a student visa but was on the verge of being deported after losing two critical chances to become a U.S. citizen. Last year, after the federal government filed papers to deport him, he appealed on humanitarian grounds. In last week's decision, deportation proceedings were dropped and an application his mother had filed seeking legal status for her son will be reinstated. "We recognize that he would be legal today were not for a series of untimely tragedies in his life," said an immigration spokeswoman.

TEXAS STATE SENATE MAY CONSIDER INTERPRETING BILL

KXXV-TV in Waco, Texas reported last week on a state Senate bill designed to make interpreters available for deaf patients during pre-arranged visits to doctors' offices and hospitals. A news team interviewed several deaf Waco residents about their frustrations with communication during medical exams. Senate Bill 214, which would cost the state $300,000, seeks to alleviate the problem so that deaf patients would not have to bring their own interpreter at a cost of "almost $40 a day," the report said. But there was "still no word on how any program could effectively treat deaf patients in emergency situations" and "no word yet on when the Texas Senate will consider the bill," the report concluded.

VIRGINIA BUDGET AMENDMENT ALLOWS CONSOLIDATION AT ONE OF TWO EXISTING SCHOOLS

Virginia Gov. Mark Warner signed a budget amendment last week that could spell the end of the Hampton campus of the state School for the Deaf and Blind. The budget deal that passed the General Assembly calls for construction of a new consolidated school, reported The Daily Press, but Warner's amendment would allow the consolidation to take place at one of the two existing schools in Hampton and Staunton. The lawmaker who requested the amendment, Del. Chris Saxman of Staunton, favors keeping the Staunton school, saying it could be renovated at half the cost of building a new school. "I remain committed to fighting to keep this great school in Staunton," he said.

SUPPORTERS OF NEW JERSEY SCHOOL SPEAK OUT AGAINST LAND SALE PLAN

About 30 supporters of the Marie H. Katzenbach School for the Deaf rode a bus from Trenton, N.J. to Collingswood to take part in an Assembly Budget Committee hearing on the state budget, The Times reported March 30. Parents, staff members and union leaders, joined together as the "Save Our School Coalition," waited four hours to make their feelings known about a proposal by state officials to sell 20 percent of the school property, a wooded area that includes wildlife and wetlands. "I'm shocked that the state would even think of selling the land," said one speaker. Another questioned why the state can pay $234 for a new prison but can't pay to renovate the school. And a third was "appalled that the state is proposing to balance the budget on the back's of New Jersey's deaf and hard-of-hearing children."

CSD LAUNCHES VIDEO RELAY SERVICE

CSD, the Sioux Falls, S.D. service provider to deaf and hard-of-hearing people, announced last Thursday that it is launching its own video relay service. According to a news release, CSD is capitalizing on its 30 years of experience in providing sign language interpreting, telephone and video relay services, and call center operations to become the nation's first deaf-owned VRS provider. Users of nearly all videophone equipment with a high-speed Internet connection will be able to access the service, and hearing callers can dial 1-800-538-9881 and give the Internet protocol (IP) address of the person they wish to connect to. CSDVRS is available from 6 a.m. to midnight CST and on weekends and holidays from 7 a.m. to 11 p.m. CST by going to www.csdvrs.com.

NAD ANNOUNCES PLANS FOR 125TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION

The National Association of the Deaf announced plans last week for its 125th anniversary celebration events, a blend of gala events and community programs that will conclude with the biennial NAD conference in New Orleans, La. in July 2006. The NAD has chosen "Cherish, Celebrate and Commit" as its anniversary theme, said president Andrew Lange, because "We cherish the past, celebrate the present and commit to the future." The NAD plans to focus its fundraising efforts on establishing a development office to ensure a strong financial future for the association. "We have much to celebrate and cherish," said CEO Nancy Bloch, "and at the same time we must commit to making America an even better place for current and future generations."


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INTERNATIONAL
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AUSTRALIAN MAN WINS IN SIXTH ATTEMPT TO OVERTURN MURDER CONVICTION

Darryl Beamish created Australian legal history Friday when his conviction in the brutal ax murder of socialite Jillian Brewer was overturned on appeal after his sixth attempt to clear his name. Beamish, now 63, was 18 when chocolate heiress Brewer, 22, was attacked in her home. He was convicted two years later and sentenced to death. His sentence was later commuted to life in prison, and he was released in 1977 after serving 15 years. Three justices say they now believed the crime was committed by notorious serial killer Eric Edgar Cooke, who confessed to killing Brewer in 1964 before being hanged. Beamish didn't want financial compensation, reported the Courier-Mail, but simply wanted "truth and justice." In a written statement after the decision, Beamish said, "I have just wanted everyone to know for sure that I did not kill anyone. Now they know."

RUSSIAN DOCUMENTARY FILMMAKER RELEASES NEW MOVIE, 'I AM DEAF'

Nikolai Makarov, a documentary filmmaker based in St. Petersburg, Russia, premiered his latest movie, "Ya Glukhoi" ("I Am Deaf"), to critical acclaim and a rousing and emotional response from the audience. According to the St. Petersburg Times, Makarov's film "portrays deaf children and adults with unflinching, unsentimental honesty, highlighting the dignity and humor in their everyday lives" within a society that tends to ignore its disabled population, including an estimated 12 million deaf and hard-of-hearing Russians. Makarov, 50, said his biggest challenge was finding people to participate in the film. Burned by unflattering portrayals in the past, deaf schools in St. Petersburg and Moscow were reluctant to get involved. But Makarov eventually earned their trust and gathered more than 20 hours of film, which he then edited into a 75-minute movie.

'ALARMING INCREASE IN DEAF AND DUMB' REPORTED IN SMALL VILLAGE

Greater Kashmir reported last week that "there has been an alarming increase in the number of deaf and dumb people in Dhadkaie," a village in the district of Doda. The number of deaf residents has increased from 40 in 1995 to 92 this year, the report stated. Many of the deaf residents trace their ancestry to one Noor Ali s/o Muhammad Ismaiel, who was born deaf in 1904. The village came to light in 1997 when journalists visited the area, but villagers continue to face problems and only 68 receive a government pension. They have an ally in former health minister Mian Altaf Ahmed, who has pledged to "fight till a proper medical investigation is done." Mian Altaf wants genetic experts to do a study and says government should open a school for the deaf.

DEAF TEENS IN IRELAND TO MAKE SITCOM WITH FILM COUNCIL GRANT

Deaf teenagers in Belfast, Ireland have been given money to make a short film, the Belfast Telegraph reported last week. The group was given a grant by First Light, the U.K. Film Council's lottery-funded film-making initiative for young people. The organization helps U.K. youngsters age 5 to 18 to make short films under the guidance of professional filmmakers. The teens will be working with the National Deaf Children's Society to make the film, which is described as a situation comedy. "We're delighted to see a humorous approach toward young people's filmmaking," said First Light CEO Pip Eldridge.

UGANDAN AIRS COMPLAINT WITH GOVERNMENT'S 'EMPTY PROMISES'

Joseph Mbulamwana, information officer for the Uganda National Association of the Deaf, criticized the government in a recent press conference at UNAD headquarters in Kamwokya. According to AllAfrica.com, Mbulamwana reminded those in attendance of President Yoweri Museveni's promise four years ago that a school for the deaf would be built in Wakiso. Construction has not even begun, he said, as the ministry has chosen to neglect deaf students and give them empty promises. "Our humble request now goes to the Minister of Education to investigate this scenario for the good of the deaf," he said.

SOAP COMPANY IN GHANA GIVES SALT TO SCHOOL FOR DEAF

Officials at the Ashanti School for the Deaf in Ghana were happy to get a donation recently from a soap manufacturing company called Afikaa. The donation amounted to a quantity of salt, along with cash totaling three million cedis (about $336 US). Kissinger Osei, marketing officer for Afikaa, said it was his company's contribution toward the upkeep of the children, and he promised that the donation would not be their last. J.K. Brantuo, the school's headmaster, said they were grateful for the assistance and used the occasion to call for more public support to help the school with its expansion plans.


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LIFE & LEISURE
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WISCONSIN HOUSING PROJECT FOR SENIORS PLANS TO OPEN BY OCTOBER

Construction is right on schedule for the Water Tower View Apartments, a 43-unit building being built in Greenfield, Wisc. The site was excavated in January, underground areas were completed in February and the base for the first floor was in place by March 19. Organizers at Cardinal Capital Management expect an opening date by Oct. 1. The homes are designed for deaf, hard-of-hearing and deaf-blind seniors, and will provide an environment that emphasizes visual communication and sign language. Management has hired two staff members for the project: Carol Comp, who will live on-site as resident manager, and Katie Voss, a housing consultant who will do outreach to local groups and assist with efforts now underway to build similar communities in Phoenix, Ariz., Rochester, N.Y. and Tampa, Fla. More information may be found at www.cardinalcapital.us.

DEAFHOPE TO PRESENT ITS FIRST FILM ABOUT DOMESTIC VIOLENCE

In honor of Sexual Assault Awareness Month, DeafHope is hosting a fundraiser April 23 in San Leandro, Calif. Mistress of ceremonies "AJ Granda" will be on hand to introduce DeafHope's first film about domestic violence, "Till Domestic Violence Do Us Part." The movie, created by an all-deaf crew and cast, was written by Julie Rems-Smario, produced by Chad Taylor and directed by Wayne Betts Jr. (Their company, MosDuex, can be found at www.mosdeux.com.) The event also features a live and silent auction, along with desserts and drinks. Admission is $5 and seating is limited. Send a check by April 21 to DeafHope, 22418 Mission Blvd., Hayward, CA 94541 or write for information to Trina Abbott at trina@deaf-hope.org.

NEW MEDICARE BENEFICIARIES OFFERED FREE MEDICAL EXAMINATION

The Hearing Review (Los Angeles) wrote last month about the new "Welcome to Medicare" examination, an initial preventive physical examination offered to new beneficiaries. The coverage was included in the Medicare Prescription Drug Improvement and Modernization Act of 2003, signed into law Dec. 8, 2003 by President Bush. The examination is for people who enroll in Medicare (Part B) on or after Jan. 1, 2005. It must be done within six months of the first coverage period and is a once-in-a-lifetime benefit. It includes a hearing screening, aimed at identifying the 25 to 40 percent of Americans over 65 who experience a hearing loss. "Education, counseling and referral as deemed appropriate" are advised for those found to have such a loss.


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WORKING WORLD
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GRANT TO FUND TECHNOLOGY CENTER AT AMERICAN SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF

The American School for the Deaf will construct a state-of-the-art Technology Center thanks in part to a $250,000 grant from the Hartford Foundation for Public Giving. The center will provide students and clients with advanced training, work skill development and hands-on experience, and allow the school to expand its offerings in computers, business, communication and digital publishing. The center will also house Printworks, a print shop serving area nonprofits and small businesses with Xerox Print on Demand technology. It all adds up to "tremendous potential to increase their academic and vocational achievement" for students, said Richard Sussman of the Hartford Foundation.

PENNSYLVANIA LAUNCHES MONTH-LONG AWARENESS CAMPAIGN FOR TELEPHONE RELAY

A public awareness campaign kicked off in Pennsylvania last week aiming to "Spread the Word" about telephone relay services. The month-long campaign calls for 74 billboards, 3,920 radio spots, 425 transit ads and 10 mall kiosk ads to be used to raise awareness of 711, the phone number that connects to the relay service. Christie Smith, deaf contestant from CBS TV's "Survivor: The Amazon," is the campaign spokesperson and is featured in 30-second radio spots. The PA Relay campaign is a partnership of the Public Utility Commission, the Pennsylvania Relay Service Advisory Board and AT&T. Visit www.parelay.net for more information.

DIET AIDE AT NAVAL MEDICAL CENTER NAMED JUNIOR CIVILIAN OF THE YEAR

Hilda Gerstlauer, a diet aide at the National Naval Medical Center in Gaithersburg, Md., was named Junior Civilian of the Year last month for customer service and support that is not only her everyday job, but also part of her character, The Journal reported March 17. Gerstlauer is hearing impaired, and credits her success to her mother, who encouraged her to learn to speak at 18 months old. Gerstlauer always has a positive attitude and is friendly with staff and patients, said foreman Ruby Alexander, and is an essential member of a team that delivers 180,000 meals to patients and staff each year.

GOAMERICA ANNOUNCES PLAN TO TAKE THE GUESSWORK OUT OF BUYING CELL PHONES

GoAmerica is joining forces with America's largest coalition of hearing healthcare physicians and audiologists to make it easier for people with hearing loss to buy cell phones. GoAmerica's agreement with Ear Professionals International Corporation was announced last Thursday at the 17th annual American Academy of Audiology Convention and Expo. The partnership is designed as a straightforward approach to compatibility that will take the guesswork out of choosing cell phones that work for consumers with hearing loss, especially those with hearing aids. GoAmerica is introducing its new Clear Mobile wireless cell phone service, and will offer cell phones bundled with specialized adaptive equipment and prepaid service plans. More information may be found at www.clearmobile.com.

FOUR DEAF PLUMBERS ARE 'GREAT GUYS,' SAYS BUILDING PROJECT MANAGER

Four employees of Dynamic Plumbing worked and chatted in total silence at the noisy construction site of the future Casa Bella Apartments in Victorville, Calif., the Riverside Press reported recently. Michael Delgadillo, Jose Oropeza, Kevin Pearson and their foreman, Robert Woodard, are all graduates of the California School for the Deaf in Riverside. "They are great guys," said project superintendent Keno Lane, who is learning sign language. The article went on to explain about deafness and deaf culture, and noted that when one of the plumbers needs to get another's attention, they "will gently throw dirt or paper at each other."

FINALISTS CHOSEN FOR NATIONAL ACADEMIC BOWL IN WASHINGTON

It's a showdown between newcomers and grizzled veterans in this year's National Academic Bowl for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students, says Gallaudet University, which sponsors the competition with J.W.Marriott, Sorenson VRS and Verizon. The finalists, chosen after a series of regional bouts, will meet April 23-26 at Gallaudet in Washington for the title of Academic Bowl champion. They are: WEST: Roosevelt High School, Seattle; Colorado School for the Deaf and the Blind; SOUTHEAST: Alabama School for the Deaf, Talladega; South Plantation (Fla.) H.S.; MIDWEST: John Hersey H.S., Arlington Heights, Ill.; Indiana School for the Deaf, Indianapolis; MID-ATLANTIC: Maryland School for the Deaf, Frederick; Mountain Lakes (N.J.) H.S.; NORTHEAST: Monroe #1 BOCES, Rochester, N.Y.; the Learning Center for Deaf Children, Framingham, Mass. Info: http://academicbowl.gallaudet.edu.

GOODWILL SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA GRADUATES 25 FROM EMPLOYMENT PROGRAMS

Goodwill Southern California announced last week that 25 deaf and hard-of-hearing students graduated in March from two GSC programs. Sixteen students completed a program that helps prepare them for work; nine others graduated from a program to help them find jobs. The agency gave its Graduate of the Year award to Mariflor Lalu of Panorama City, who went through the program while attending college and now has a job with a staffing agency. More than 15,000 people benefited from GSC's programs last year at 43 stores, three campuses and seven career resource centers throughout Southern California.

CALIFORNIA STUDENTS TAKE PART IN SCHOOL'S FIRST MATH FESTIVAL

Students at the Riverside campus of the California School for the Deaf participated in the school's first math festival last week. The event was designed to make the subject less scary, reported The Press-Enterprise, and activities ranged from simple counting exercises to geometry puzzles that left even some adults perplexed. The event was coordinated by Paul Giganti, who travels the state bringing math festivals to public and private schools. The activities were visually stimulating, which won applause from school superintendent Harold Kund. "It's hands-on and it's fun, and it's challenging at the same time," he said.


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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT
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CAPTIONING'S 'NEWEST INNOVATION' MAKES DEBUT AT TEXAS THEATER

"The newest in subtitle innovations" was reported Saturday in a Dallas Morning News article about Rave Motion Pictures, which last month began showing open-captioned films at a mall in Hurst, Texas. The system allows a theater to add or remove subtitles from a movie using Digital Theater Systems' Cinema Subtitling System, which reads and displays captions from a disk. With this system, deaf people can see the latest films, said Jeremy Devine of Rave Motion Pictures. Some other theaters in the area provide captioned films, but viewers must wait for a captioned version to arrive or view reflected captions on a device that attaches to the seats in front of them.

MINNESOTA SCHOOL TO PREMIERE RAYMOND LUCZAK PLAY 'DOOGLE'

The Minnesota State Academy for the Deaf will premiere an original play titled "Doogle" this weekend. It's playwright Raymond Luczak's twelfth play, and one he wrote specifically for the Faribault, Minn. school. Revolving around romance, technology and family, the play uses a group of high school students at a deaf residential school to explore what it means to be deaf in a time when technology makes it easier to be deaf. Performances are set for the MSAD campus April 7-9 and at St. Paul College Aug. 26 (all start at 7 p.m.) Information may be obtained from pat.clarke@msad.state.mn.us.

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED FOR DEAF THEATRE FESTIVAL IN BOSTON

VSA arts of Massachusetts is working with the Show of Hands Theatre Company on Boston's first-ever Deaf Theatre Festival, to take place Nov. 17-19. The festival will showcase well-known performers and troupes; the Moscow Theatre of the Deaf has already signed on to perform. Festival co-chairs Bonnie Kaplan and Janis Cole issued a call for volunteers last week with a list of 17 committees that need to be filled, from web page to backstage. Their first planning meeting is tonight at 6 p.m., but if you can't make it and still want to get involved, send an email to BSK@vsamass.org or Janisx1@comcast.net.


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SPORTS
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DEAFNESS CHALLENGES BUT DOESN'T DETER ROWER FOR FLORIDA TECH

Mike DeRosa almost quit when he first began rowing for Florida Tech in Melbourne four years ago, in his first attempt at organized sports. But the 22-year-old Connecticut native stuck it out, and is now considered one of the strongest members of the rowing crew. DeRosa, born with a profound hearing loss, removes one of his hearing aids and leaves in the other before each race so he can hear coach Marc Mandel shout instructions on a megaphone. DeRosa helped his team beat top-ranked Temple University in its first race of the season, and he remains one of the most committed competitors. "He had me ship a rowing machine to his house during spring break so he could practice," Mandel told WPTV-News.

FLORIDA MAN GRABS TOP PRIZE AT FIRST WORLD DEAF POKER TOURNAMANT

Richard Hammond of Florida won $2,000 and a silver trophy bowl in the first World Deaf Poker Tournament held March 25-26 at the Palm Beach County Association for the Deaf. Hammond donated $100 of his winnings to the association's building fund. Plans are already underway for the second annual tournament, to be held March 16-17, 2006 at the Holiday Inn in Boynton Beach, Fla. Organizers anticipate up to 250 participants and a top prize of $10,000. Send in $25 now to hold your spot to: Barry Steinberg, 360 Main Blvd., Unit D, Boynton Beach, FL 33435.


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COMING EVENTS
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ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. TO HOST NATIONAL DEAF LATINO CONFERENCE

The National Deaf Latino Conference has been announced for June 30-July 2 at the Doubletree Hotel in Albuquerque, N.M. The hotel rate is $69 per night for up to four individuals per room. Room reservations need to be made by May 31. All information regarding the conference may be found at the NDLC website: www.n-d-l-c.org. For further questions, write to NDLC05@aol.com.

SOBERFEST COMING UP IN AUGUST AT CAMP MARK SEVEN

SoberCamp is returning to Camp Mark Seven in Old Forge, N.Y. Signs of Sobriety and SAISD are coordinating the Aug. 14-20 retreat, for deaf and hard-of-hearing people in recovery from substance abuse, along with their families. Activities include outdoor recreation, team-building games, family/relationship bonding, 12-step meetings and more. Attendees must be sober/clean at least 30 days prior to camp. A $25 registration fee will hold your spot; additional costs will be announced soon and include lodging at Camp Mark Seven and all meals. For more information, write to info@signsofsobriety.org.


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READER RESPONSE
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I have been reading your weekly online newsletter for a few months now and I really enjoy it. It is extremely informative and it helps this office keep in touch with the happenings of the Deaf community.
– Tim Burkhart, Office of Deaf Access


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EMPLOYMENT
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WRITER

The Public Relations Office of Gallaudet University has a position available for Writer to write for a broad range of print and electronic publications produced by the Public Relations Office, the Development Office, and the Alumni Relations Office, including: the University’s web site, “Inside Gallaudet,” “On the Green,” the alumni newsletter, and “Gallaudet Today.” REQUIRES: Bachelor’s degree in journalism, creative writing or a related field. Evidence of excellent writing skills. At least two years professional writing experience including promotional and news writing. Strong organizational, interpersonal, and presentation skills. Fluency in American Sign Language or willingness to become fluent. Sign language classes are free. Gallaudet offers a highly competitive starting salary and excellent benefits including 13 paid vacation days per year, 13 paid sick leave days per year, paid holidays, health, life, and dental insurances, retirement plans, and educational assistance programs. To apply, send resume and cover letter to: Gallaudet University, Human Resources, 800 Florida Avenue, NE, ATTN: Job #05047, Washington, DC 20002. Faxes (202-651-5344) and emailed documents (Joanne.Jones@Gallaudet.edu) are accepted. EOE

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Rochester Institute of Technology
National Technical Institute for the Deaf
Coordinator Outreach Operations
PC#0380 (Administrative/Professional)

Student & Academic Services

Description

Educational Outreach programs are designed to promote RIT/NTID's national visibility and image. In accordance with NTID's Vision 2010, the coordinator will manage outreach programs offered to all external audiences (future student, teachers, parents, vocational rehabilitation counselors, and deaf adults.)

Major Responsibilities

Provide leadership, coordination, and management of all educational programs and activities offered to external audiences (parents, teachers, potential future students). These programs include: Explore Your Future (EYF), Career Awareness Program (CAP), and developing projects to reach specific target populations including but not limited to: 7-11 grade girls interested in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM); ALANA students; and students demonstrating academic excellence.

1. Conducts needs assessment, and identify emerging content areas that lend themselves to future outreach activities.
2. Lead the departments' planning, budgeting, and program evaluation functions.
3. Administer the programming and staffing functions of all educational outreach programs.
4. Direct, monitor and facilitate outreach activities in collaboration with NTID Enrollment Management and Admissions.
5. Develop creative funding solutions in collaboration with external agencies and partners for all program offerings. Pursue external funding sources, both private and governmental.
6. Initiate partnerships with other colleges of RIT and premier programs within NTID to modify curricular offerings to attract an outreach audience.
7. Evaluate program offerings and analyze added benefit for outreach initiatives in terms of ultimate enrollment gains.
Requirements
Education: MS degree in higher education administration, research, instructional development, deaf education or related field.

Experience: 4-6 years related administrative experience

Skills: Applicant is expected to have excellent communication, interpersonal, organizational skills, and computer literacy. Applicant must be able to work independently. Ability to communicate fluently in American Sign Language and knowledge of deaf culture required. Be current in educational outreach implications of all legislation related to IDEA and other federal and state mandates related to No Child Left Behind and High Stakes Testing. Knowledge of ADA and 504 legislation related to secondary disabilities and access services required.

Note: The above statements are intended to describe the general nature and level of work being performed by people assigned to this classification. They are not intended to be construed as an exhaustive list of all responsibilities, duties and skills required of personnel so classified.

The final phase of the hiring process for this position requires a criminal background and/or motor vehicle records check. Any verbal or written offer made is contingent on satisfactory results, as determined by Human Resources.

Send letter of interest with resume and the names, addresses, and phone numbers of three references to:

Rochester Institute of Technology
Department of Human Resources
Eastman Building, 5th Floor
8 Lomb Memorial Drive
Rochester, NY 14623-5604

RIT AA/EOE

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