deafweekly

March 2, 2005
Vol. 1 No. 20

Editor: Tom Willard


Deafweekly is an independent news report for the deaf and hard-of-hearing community. It is mailed to subscribers every Wednesday morning and available to read at www.deafweekly.com. For information, contact mail@deafweekly.com.

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The contents of Deafweekly are Copyright 2005. Any unauthorized use, including reprinting of news, is prohibited. Readership: approximately 4,000 including subscribers and website readers.

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NATIONAL
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FCC PROPOSES FINES FOR 3 SAN DIEGO TV STATIONS FOR MISSING CAPTIONS

In its first such action, the Federal Communications Commission has proposed fining three San Diego television stations for failing to provide captioning or other visual information during the October 2003 wildfires. KGTV/Channel 10 and KFMB/Channel 8 would be fined $20,000 each and KUSI/Channel 51 would pay $25,000 under the plan announced last Wednesday. The FCC investigation was prompted by complaints made by Larry Sivertson of Clairemont, Calif., who runs HearingLossWeb.com. He said he and his wife, Char, turned to their TV for emergency news and "there were no captions anywhere." KUSI said it did not violate any rules and would appeal the decision. "I think the FCC is out of touch with reality as it concerns local broadcasters," said vice president Mike McKinnon Jr.

UTAH BILL WOULD EXPAND INTERPRETER TRAINING PROGRAMS

Rep. Brent Goodfellow has introduced a bill that would tackle the state's shortage of interpreter by drawing on the revenue from telephone surcharges to expand college interpreting programs. According to the Deseret Morning News, only 12 interpreters are trained annually at Salt Lake Community College, while Goodfellow says the state needs to train at least 100 interpreters per year. "The jobs are out there," he said -- and they pay up to $65,000 a year. The bill passed in the House 68-0 and now moves to the Senate.

WORKER PLACED ON LEAVE AFTER SCHOOL LEARNS HE'S OUT ON BAIL

Kentucky School for the Deaf officials ordered a maintenance man off campus last Wednesday after discovering the man was out on bond from a local jail on charges of first-degree rape. Michael Hume, of Hustonville, was arrested Feb. 17 after a woman told police he had forced himself on her while she was under the influence of a disabling medication. Bond was set at $5,000 payable at 10 percent, and Hume was released after posting the money. The school did a mandatory background check on Hume when he was hired in 1987, but officials were not notified of his recent arrest. "There's no requirement that they notify me," KSD administrator Larry Conner said of law enforcement officers.

DEAF MAN'S DOGS DIE AFTER BEING POISONED WITH PESTICIDE

Jim Rearick of Meadow, N.C. buried his three dogs Feb. 8, and state officials have confirmed that they were poisoned with Counter, an agricultural pesticide. The deaths come three years after Molly, a Lab who served as Rearick's hearing dog, died in his arms after being poisoned with the same pesticide. The poisonings were intentionally done, state Pesticide Inspector Ken Crabtree told The Dunn (N.C.) Daily Record. A search of nearby woods revealed the makings of a meth lab, and Rearick is concerned that other dogs may suffer. "If they're going to do it to me, they're going to do it to someone else," he said.

3-YEAR-OLD GIRL USES SIGN LANGUAGE TO HELP SAVE HER MOTHER'S LIFE

A Westhampton, New York woman's decision to teach her young daughter sign language may have saved her life, the Associated Press reported last week. Kristin Comeau dialed 911 on Feb. 23 when she began having trouble breathing, but her throat closed up and she couldn't tell the operator what was wrong. She handed the phone to daughter Ruby, 3, and signed the word "help," which the girl repeated on the phone. Ruby also gave the operator her address, which she'd learned from her dad. Comeau was taken to a hospital and has recovered from what is believed to have been a severe allergic reaction.

THIRD WOMAN SUES FOUNDATION, CLAIMING PRESSURE TO BARE BREASTS

Iris Rivera sued the Gorilla Foundation last week, becoming the third woman to claim she was pressured by foundation president Francine Patterson to expose her breasts to Koko, the sign-language-speaking gorilla. Rivera, who quit her job as an administrative assistant last month, claimed Patterson told her that Koko was signing that "she wants to see your nipples," ABC News reported Saturday. Rivera, 39, agreed to the demands, unlike Nancy Alperin and Kendra Keller, who filed similar claims two weeks ago. "She took it as a disagreeable duty of her employment," said her lawyer.

NEVADA CONSIDERS LOOSENING OF INTERPRETER CERTIFICATION RULES

Nevada's Department of Education is trying to relax the requirements for interpreters in the state, and the Nevada Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf is fighting back. According to NRID president Caroline Preston Bass, the department is trying to change the law to allow uncertified interpreters to work with deaf schoolchildren. "Our deaf children deserve the best interpreters, not the weakest," she said. The rule change (BDR-34-933) has the support of Assemblywoman Bonnie Parnell, who is expected to bring it before the Legislature. A letter-writing campaign to legislators is underway, and more information may be obtained from mail@prestonbass.com.

HIGH SCHOOL SENIOR MAKES HISTORY AS LEGISLATIVE PAGE

Chelsea Tobin made history in South Dakota this week when she wrapped up a two-week stint as a page in the state House of Representatives. Tobin, 18, is believed to be the first hearing-impaired person to serve as a page in the Legislature, and she "broadened the horizons of lawmakers, lobbyists and legislative workers," reported the Argus Leader. Tobin said she was nervous when she started the job, which involves delivering messages and tending the mailroom, but soon decided, "I'd just have as much fun as I could." Tobin was accompanied to Pierre by Joyce Levsen, who has interpreted for the Langford High School senior since she was in fifth grade.

ROBBERY OF DEAF MAN MAKES THE NEWS IN FLORIDA

The Herald of Bradenton, Fla. reported last week on the Feb. 22 robbery of a deaf man. The victim, who was not identified, was walking on a street in Manatee at 2:30 a.m. when he was attacked from behind and knocked to the ground. The suspect fled with the man's wallet, and police used a description to arrest Alan Byers, 35, of Bradenton on robbery charges. The wallet was found in a trash can near where Byers was found, and the victim identified him as the attacker.

STOP DROPPING CAPTIONS, WISCONSIN WOMAN TELLS TV STATION

The La Crosse (Wisc.) Tribune printed Verda Grabinski's letter on TV captioning last week. Grabinski is upset because WKBT-TV drops the closed-captioning when it puts up emergency weather reports. Grabinski said she's contacted the station many times, but the problem persists. It's discrimination, she claims, because "they have voice left on for hearing people but take off the caption." Grabinski stressed that deaf people need captioning to know what is being said. "I think it is about time for this discrimination to stop," she concluded.

SOUTH DAKOTA OFFICIAL BOOSTS FUNDING FOR COCHLEAR IMPLANTS

South Dakota Rep. Paul Dennert had a successful week, reported the Marshall County (S.D.) Journal, when two of his bills passed House floor action. One of the bills, HB 1158, would provide funding for children less than 5 to help pay for cochlear implants. "The savings for the state in future years is enormous as cost for a student in our deaf school is approximately $45,000 per year," he wrote. "In addition, most cochlear implant children only have to remain in the deaf school setting for 3-4 years and not their whole academic career."


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Get an Interpreter Quickly with IP-RELAY VRS!
IP-Relay Video Relay Service lets sign language users communicate naturally. Connect and communicate in real-time using either a DLink videophone or a Web-cam. NAD/RID certified interpreters are available to handle your calls and allow you to express more in less time. Let your family and friends hear you the way you intend. Visit www.IP-RELAY.com or www.IP-VRS.com for more information.
Place a call through IP-Relay VRS and communicate your way!

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Sprint Relay Wireless, powered by GoAmerica®, is available on the Sidekick/HipTop wireless devices. Sprint Relay Wireless is also accessible through the RIM 850, 857 and 950 devices running WyndTell® service.
Sidekick and HipTop wireless device users access Sprint Relay by clicking on the bright TTY icon directly from the chooser screen. To download and install Sprint Relay Wireless, access the device’s “Catalog” download feature. In the catalog, simply select “Sprint Relay Wireless” from the Applications list, and select “Purchase” to download and install the service for free. For more information on Sprint Relay Wireless, visit http://www.sprintrelay.com/ or email srw@goamerica.com.

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INTERNATIONAL
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PROLIFIC COMPOSER, DEAF SINCE 1991, PREMIERES MOST AMBITIOUS WORK

Composer James Douglas has been unable to hear his own work since illness left him deaf 14 years ago, but he's had a distinguished career and seen his work performed in New York, Paris and London. Last Friday, his most ambitious creation premiered in his hometown of Edinburgh, Scotland. Titled "The Christ Church Sequence," the collection of 75 pieces of music -- the most he's ever written for one work -- took Douglas three years to write. Each piece was dedicated to a person or group who supported or inspired him after a chronic ear infection robbed him of his hearing in 1991. Douglas, 72, has written over 2,000 pieces for a variety of instruments, reported the Edinburgh Evening News, and "music has always been a part of his life, despite the odds," said daughter Katherine Simpson.

CYPRUS OFFICIALS BLAMED FOR DELAY IN ACCEPTING COCHLEAR IMPLANTS

Parents of deaf children in Cyprus say the government's delay in accepting cochlear implants has left dozens of children completely deaf. A parents association told the House Human Rights Committee that their calls for cochlear implants in the 1990s fell on deaf ears. Parents went abroad to gather information and pushed for the procedure to be done on young children in Cyprus, but to no avail. Health minister Frixos Savvides finally agreed to allow the procedure in 2000, but it was too late for many children. "Dozens of children who would have had the advantage of an implant are now completely deaf," association chairman Marios Tempriotis told the Cyprus Mail.

UPGRADED 'LISTENING BUS' BRINGS LATEST IN TECHNOLOGY

The Evening Telegraph and Post of Dundee (U.K.) was on the scene when the National Deaf Children's Society Listening Bus rolled into Carlogie Primary School in Carnoustie last Friday. The bus has been upgraded since it was first launched in 1996, with the addition of large-screen TVs, a webcam for live video links, a projector, the latest radio aids, mobile phone accessories and more. Students had the opportunity to see the latest available technology, including amplified phones, flashing and shaking alarm clocks, special smoke alarms, vibrating pagers, listening aids, captioned videos and learning software. The Listening Bus brings vital information to parents and children "practically on their doorsteps," said NDCS chief executive Susan Daniels.

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Free Shipping on Orders of $50 or More at Harris Communications!
Buy from Harris Communications and receive Free Shipping on purchases of $50 or more. (Certain product restrictions apply. UPS Ground shipments only.) Hurry, free shipping is only available until March 13, 2005. For more information, go to http://www.harriscomm.com/link/?www.harriscomm.com?sr=deafweeklynews or contact us at mailto:info@harriscomm.com.

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Important Information For VRS Users
SIGNED VIDEO AVAILABLE!

Hi VRS Users,
On January 26, 2005, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) released public documents to clarify that certain VRS practices are not allowed. The following practices were covered:
DENYING CHOICE OF VRS PROVIDER
DENYING INFORMED CONSENT IF INTEROPERABILITY REMOVED
CONTACTING PRIOR CUSTOMERS OR IMPOSING MINIMUM USAGE
REWARDS PROGRAMS
ADVANCE RESERVATIONS; VRI
SELECTIVE ANSWERING
CALL BACKS
CSD, one of the VRS providers, has published on its website an article by Karen Peltz Strauss, CSD’s legal consultant. SIGNED VIDEO VERSION is also available!
Go To: http://www.c-s-d.org/Default.aspx?tabid=239

CSD
Community & Media Relations
www.c-s-d.org

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LIFE & LEISURE
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HEARING LOSS IN OLDER PEOPLE MIGHT BE RELATED TO BRAIN, NOT EARS

Older people can have trouble with their hearing even when their ears work fine, researchers said last week at a meeting of otolaryngolgists in New Orleans. The problem is in the brain and the way it processes information as it ages. "There are many people who have good inner ears who just don't hear well," said Robert D. Frisina, a professor from Rochester, N.Y. "That's because their brains are aging." Researchers reported on the hunt for genes that play a role in the brain's ability to process what the ears take in, reported the Senior Journal (San Antonio, Texas) last week, and Frisina's team discussed its use of gene-chip activity to chart the activity of more than 22,000 genes in mice.

LIBRARY TAKES ON CAPTIONED MOVIES AFTER PRIVATE THEATER QUITS

The Coventry Village branch of the Cleveland Heights-University Heights (Ohio) Library will be showing free captioned movies at 2 p.m. on the first Sunday of every month. The new service was started after library officials met with deaf residents in October to discuss their needs, and "the resounding response was we needed closed-captioned movies," branch manager Abigail Noland told The Plain Dealer. Tower City Cinema had been showing captioned movies since 2002, but dropped the program after about two years due to poor attendance. The library won't need to make a profit, and they've already paid a $250 annual fee for the rights to show the films.

SHOPPERS WITH DISABILITIES INVITED TO FILL OUT QUESTIONNAIRE

Rob McGuire, an interior design student at Marymount University in Arlington, Va., needs your help with his graduate thesis. McGuire is studying retail accessibility and wants to improve the shopping experience for people with hearing, visual and physical disabilities. He hopes to design solutions to the top challenges, and he's put together a brief questionnaire to help him gain this information. If you'd like to participate, email him at robertmmcguire@hotmail.com.


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WWW.EDGARYWIRELESS.COM
BLACKBERRY EMAIL: ED8459@TMO.BLACKBERRY.NET
AIM:OBFAN
EMAIL: ed8459@comcast.net
FAX:610-626-0647
TTY:610-626-0807 LEAVE THE TTY MSG UNTIL 1030 PM EST.

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Want quicker access to Video Relay Service? Hamilton VRS encourages all D-Link consumers to add call.hipvrs.com to their videophone speed dial list. This will also enable consumers to connect with their choice of VRS provider.

To add the IP address for Hamilton VRS to your list:
1. Go to "Dial" button and click on the button to enter another prompt.
2. Go to "Add" to add the video relay service address in the Speed Dial list. You will see a prompt immediately after hitting the "Add" button that will contain information such as name, telephone number field, and address field.
3. Go to the address field and enter "call.hipvrs.com" and click on the "OK" button upon completion to save the address.

Contact Customer Support
Via Phone: 1-877-283-7687 V/TTY
Via Instant Messaging (AOL, Yahoo or MSN) at HamiltonVRSHelp
(from 8:30 A.M. to 5:00 P.M. (EST), Monday – Friday
Via E-mail: hipvrs@hamiltonrelay.com
Hamilton VRS hours are from 7:30 AM to Midnight EST daily.

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WORKING WORLD
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INSTRUCTOR AT AVIATION HIGH SCHOOL AIMS FOR HIS OWN PILOT'S LICENSE

Students at Seattle's Aviation High School get a normal high school education and also learn to fly, reported KOMO-TV on Saturday. Sometimes they are taught by a technology teacher who has not been approved to fly on his own. Rob Drake, who runs the school's computers, can't get a license because he can't hear an airplane. "Born deaf," he said. He was taken under the wing of flight instructor Christy Helgeson, and after hours of flying together, Drake set off in late December on a solo flight. He did five flawless touch-and-go landings, making his radio calls at every turn and approach. He's on target to obtain his private license, making him Washington's first deaf pilot; about 100 exist nationwide.

NAD COMMITTEE TO STUDY IMPACT OF VIDEO RELAY SERVICES

The National Association of the Deaf has assembled a committee to address the impact of Video Relay Services on the deaf and interpreting communities. Citing a "very serious shortage of interpreters available for work in the community" due to the growing popularity of VRS, the NAD wants the committee to decide how it should address "this national crisis," the association said in a news release last week. NAD president Andrew Lange has appointed Sherri Collins, executive director of the Arizona Commission for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing, to chair the committee. She's joined by nine other members and two NAD board liaisons.

SEATTLE INTERPRETING AGENCY GROWS INTO $2M-A-YEAR BUSINESS

SignOn, a sign-language interpretation business that grossed $2 million in revenue last year, was profiled Monday in the Puget Sound Business Journal. The company grew out of an all-day retreat eight years ago at the West Seattle home of Laurie Reinhardt. Most of the seven women in attendance were freelance interpreters, and they decided to bring their expertise under one roof and work together rather than compete. "We figured all we needed was a plan," said Reinhardt, "and we still have the same one." SignOn's business has grown steadily but really took off, the newspaper noted, when the firm signed a contract with Sprint two years ago to provide interpreters on the Internet.

GALLAUDET NAMES TWO NEW MEMBERS TO BOARD OF TRUSTEES

Two new members have been appointed to the Gallaudet University Board of Trustees. They are Harvey Goodstein of Arizona, a Gallaudet educator for over 30 years who planned the 2002 Deaf Way II conference; and Tom L. Humphries, associate professor at the University of California, San Diego who co-authored "Inside Deaf Culture" with his wife Carol Padden, a former Board of Trustee member. Goodstein and Humphries take on their new duties in May, and their "expertise, experience and energy will contribute significantly to the board's efforts," said chair Glenn Anderson.


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SIGN LANGUAGE FOR THE FAMILY VIDEO SERIES and COMPANION BOOK
English and Spanish Versions both in video or DVD format.
The NEW 2005 SIGN LANGUAGE CALENDAR ASL, English and Spanish
It is also available as a FUNDRAISER for your organization.
8 ½ x 11 full color laminated Sign Language Posters.
BROCHURES AND A FREE PROMOTIONAL CD will be sent upon request.
E-mail your request to: coloroflanguage@bak.rr.com .
Visit our website at http://www.coloroflanguage.com/

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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT
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MURAL SURVIVES FIRE BUT STILL ON SHAKY FOUNDATION

A mural featuring a deaf man who assisted train passengers 50 years ago survived a fire that swept through the Plant City, Fla. historic district last week, The Tampa Tribune reported. The mural, on an outer wall of lawyer James Buzbee's office, was painted by local artist John Briggs. The deaf man in the painting was Albert Kees, who in the 1950s waited for trains and helped women with their luggage. The 76-by-23-foot mural, titled "Reflection of a Town," was commissioned in 1974 through a public arts program. Though the mural survived the fire, the wall it's painted on was damage and might need to be removed, fire officials said. The wall could be dismantled in sections and preserved, but it's up to building owner Dennis Spurlock.

DEAF ROCHESTER FILM FESTIVAL KICKS OFF IN TWO WEEKS

The Deaf Rochester (N.Y.) Film Festival is coming up in about two weeks (March 18-20). Festival attendees will view films from different countries, learn from a deaf cinema scholar, discuss filmmaking with film professionals, and network with other attendees. Highlights include the feature films "Stille Liebe/Secret Love" and "Dear Frankie," keynote presenter Jane Norman, panel discussions, networking luncheons and a children's program. Go to www.ntid.rit.edu/DRFF/ for more information.

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Upcoming DIIT Workshops at NTID/RIT, Rochester NY
http://www.rit.edu/diit
or 585-475-2225 V/TTY

Deaf Initiative in Information Technology (DIIT) would like to inform and invite you to attend their upcoming workshops held at NTID.

DIIT sponsors computer and information technology workshops designed especially for deaf and hard-of-hearing professionals. You will have the opportunity to learn new technical skills, in an all sign environment, while networking with other deaf IT professionals.

Building and Managing a Secure Wireless Network
Instructor: David Lawrence
Date: May 9-13, 2005
Place: NTID/RIT, Rochester NY
Cost: $300

Network Inspection, Maintenance, and Troubleshooting
Instructor: Dean Lauria
Date: May 16-20, 2005
Place: NTID/RIT, Rochester NY
Cost: $300

Introduction to XML-eXtensible Markup Language
Instructor: John Sweeney
Date: May 18-20, 2005
Place: NTID/RIT, Rochester NY
Cost: $200

Building Dynamic Web Applications with ColdFusion® and SQL
Instructor: Ari Ogoke
Date: May 23-27, 2005
Place: NTID/RIT, Rochester NY
Cost: $300

Multimedia Programming with Macromedia Director MX
Instructor: Anthony Spiecker
Date: June 6-10, 2005
Place: NTID/RIT, Rochester NY
Cost: $300

Introduction to JavaScript
Instructor: Karen Beiter
Date: June 13-17, 2005
Place: NTID/RIT, Rochester NY
Cost: $300

For more information visit: http://www.rit.edu/diit . If you are interested in attending, click "Registration" on the left side of that web page, or call 585-475-2225 V/TTY.

DIIT is supported by a grant from the National Science Foundation.

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SPORTS
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KETCHNER CONFIDENT OF LANDING A JOB WITH DODGERS

Ryan Ketchner won't be making the Los Angeles Dodgers team out of spring training because, among other reasons, he's recovering from elbow surgery last October. But the 22-year-old Californian has no doubt he will make the Major Leagues, "and who's going to tell him otherwise?" said a report last week on MLB.com. Ketchner is vying to be the first deaf pitcher in the big leagues since Luther Taylor in 1908, a distinction the left-hander says "would be cool." His role model is Curtis Pride, one of only a few deaf players in major-league history and currently a contender for a position on the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim. "When I was little, he told me I could do it," said Ketchner.

HOCKEY PLAYER CONCERNED ABOUT LEAVING DEAF PARENTS BEHIND

Howell (Mich.) high school hockey player Jon Madden will soon move hundreds of miles from home to play junior hockey and pursue his dream of playing in the National Hockey League, but the 17-year-old worries about what will happen when he leaves his deaf parents behind. According to MLive.com, Bob and Sandy Madden "will be without a full-time home helpmate" for the first time in almost 20 years. (Daughter Sara, 20, is studying at Madonna University to become an interpreter.) Jon learned to sign before he could talk, and from an early age "was forced to learn to deal with his parents' deafness," the report stated. Being deaf is a hard thing to deal with, he noted: "I look up to them because they do it with ease."

VIEWERS FLOCK TO DEAFLYMPICS TV TO VIEW COMPETITION FOOTAGE

DeafNation announced last week that "a staggering 1.1 million viewers within 12 days" have visited its Deaflympics TV website to view actual footage from the 20th Deaflympics Games, held in January in Melbourne, Australia. DeafNation CEO Joel Barish said it marks a big change from the previous Deaflympics four years ago, when people relied on pictures and text-based stories to keep up with the news. Tiffany Granfors, the Deaflympics executive director, said the technology accomplishes two things: it allows the friends and families of competitors to keep in touch on a daily basis and raises the level of media coverage to that of other athletic organizations.

DEAFLYMPICS SAYS LEGAL MATTER 'IS CONSIDERED CLOSED'

The U.S. Court of Appeals has rejected an appeal by Rafael I. Pinkashov Pinchas, said Tiffany Granfors, executive director of the Deaflympics, in a statement Feb. 23. The court denied Pinchas Jan. 24 and again Feb. 8 after he requested a full hearing, she said, and therefore the civil action "is considered closed." Not so, said Pinchas in his own statement released two days later. His appeal in a defamation lawsuit against Jerald Jordan and Deaflympics president Donalda Ammons is still alive, he claimed, because, among other reasons, the defendants violated nine judicial rules and made eight defamatory statements about the plaintiff that went unanswered by the court.


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COMING EVENTS
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ASPIRING MODELS, PHOTOGRAPHERS INVITED TO MODEL SEARCH IN OHIO

Aspiring deaf male and female models and photographers are invited to Dayton, Ohio June 2-4 for the 3rd Etta Model Search 2005. Deaf model Dawn Emmons is directing the competition, and awards will be given out for Ms Etta Model Search 2005, Male of the Year 2005 and Photographer of the Year. The three winners will receive a free trip to New Mexico in July for a photo shoot. The deadline to sign up is April 1 and there is a $100 entry fee. Spokesman Donald Stewart can be reached at drstewtx@comcast.net and more details can be found at www.angelfire.com/film/ettamodel/3rd_Etta_Model_Events.htm.


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EMPLOYMENT
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Job Announcement: Deaf Adult Services, Inc., Buffalo, NY
Coordinator- Client & Community Services
Responsibilities: Consumer advocacy, information and referral, Community Education, In-Service Presentations, Liaison to Deaf Advisory Council, Event planning and preparation assistance
Qualifications (Minimum): AA Social Work or related field preferred, 1 yr. experience working with Deaf/HOH, ASL fluency, Deaf strongly encouraged to apply,
Pay based on experience, full benefits and pension plan
Application deadline: Open Until Filled
Resume and Cover letter to: By mail: Attn: Sarah Smith, Deaf Adult Services, Inc., 2495 Main St., Suite 450, Buffalo, NY 14214, By fax: (716) 833-7480, By e-mail: office@wnydas.org.

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National Technical Institute for the Deaf
Rochester Institute of Technology
Instructional Faculty (Tenure Track)
Department of American Sign Language and Interpreting Education
PC#0226

Description:

Nature of position: Full-time (10-month) Tenure Track Instructional Faculty position beginning September 1, 2005.

Teach courses to NTID Interpreting students with responsibility to teach in the other programs in the department as needed.
Provide leadership in curriculum design and materials development for American Sign Language courses and Interpreting courses.
Advise students in the Interpreting program.
Participate and contribute to professional organizations in the fields of interpreting education and ASL instruction.
Contribute to traditional faculty responsibilities (e.g. professional development, professional activities, committees).

Qualifications:

Required:
MA/MS degree required in an appropriate discipline related to the field of ASL instruction and/or interpreting education.
Significant experience with curriculum development required.
Qualified-level Certification from the American Sign Language Teachers Association required within two years of hire; must achieve Professional Level Certification by tenure review time.
Native or native-like proficiency in American Sign Language required. Teaching experience in the post-secondary setting required.
Demonstrated knowledge of and sensitivity to the characteristics of second language teaching/learning and adult learners required.
Ability to contribute to the field on interpreting education including ASL instruction required.
Ability to contribute in meaningful ways to the college's continuing commitment to cultural diversity, pluralism and individual differences required.

Preferred:
Ph.D. preferred.
Experience with interpreting education programs preferred.

People who are Deaf and hard-of-hearing are strongly encouraged to apply.

Salary and Rank: Position is a ten-month, tenure-track appointment. Salary and rank will be commensurate with qualifications and experience.

Application Procedure:

Send letter of interest with a vita and the names, addresses, and phone numbers of three references and the Source Code to:

Search Committee Chair PC #0226
Department of American Sign Language and Interpreting Education
National Technical Institute for the Deaf
Rochester Institute of Technology
52 Lomb Memorial Drive
Rochester, NY 14623

DEADLINE FOR APPLICATIONS: April 15, 2005

The Rochester Institute of Technology is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer. Members of protected classes and individuals with the ability to contribute in meaningful ways to the university's continuing commitment to cultural diversity, pluralism, and individual differences are encouraged to make application.

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POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT
SECONDARY TEACHER FOR DEAF AND HARD OF HEARING/SCIENCE

Starting Date: August 2005

Salary Range: Commensurate with education and experience

Benefits: Comprehensive fringe benefit package

Desired Qualifications:
- Idaho Teacher Certification for Deaf and Hard of Hearing or equivalent
- One or more science endorsements
- Additional endorsements are beneficial
- Excellent receptive and expressive skills in American Sign Language
- Minimum of Bachelor’s Degree Master’s degree preferred
- Experience teaching deaf and/or blind children preferred
- Experience teaching subjects outside of endorsement areas preferred

Duties:- Assumes responsibility for providing a quality science program
- Maintains discipline within the classroom
- Works with teachers to develop a continuum of educational activities throughout the curriculum
- Attends IEP meetings and other meetings required for the delivery of educational services
- Participates in committees and other job related activities
- Other duties as assigned

Application Procedures:
Submit the following to:
Human Resources Department
Idaho School for the Deaf and the Blind
1450 Main Street
Gooding, Idaho 83330
- Letter of application
- Copies of certification
- Three letters of recommendation
- Official transcripts
- Resume

Deadline:
Open until filled

Location:
Idaho School for the Deaf and the Blind is located in Gooding, Idaho (population 3,500); a small agricultural community located in south central Idaho within a short distance to mountains, rivers and related outdoor activities. The city of Gooding is a quiet family oriented community. For more information about Idaho School for the Deaf and the Blind check our website at: www. Isdb.state.id.us

For more information contact:
Human resources Department at 208-934-4457 (Voice/TTY) or email sherry.hann@isdb.idaho.gov.

Successful candidate will be required to furnish a background check within three months of employment as per Idaho Code 33-130.

Hiring is done without regard to race, color, religion, national origin, gender, age or disability. In addition, preference may be given to veterans who qualify under state and federal laws and regulations. If you need special accommodations to satisfy testing requirements, please contact the Human resources Department.

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JOB OPPORTUNITIES @ GLAD

GLAD is an Affirmative Action Employer with equal opportunity for men, women and people with disabilities.
For more information on the following positions, go to: www.gladinc.org
Status of all positions is: Regular, Full-time, Non-Exempt, Full Fringe Benefits unless otherwise noted.
All positions are open until filled. Revised 2/28/05

HIV PROGRAM INTERPRETER in Los Angeles
Brief Summary: Under the supervision of the Director of Health/Education Services, the HIV Program Interpreter will perform all duties and tasks as outlined in the AESD program scope of work, interpret initial HIV antibody test and results, update and maintain a pool of qualified HIV-trained interpreters to assist with interpreting assignments, interpret and coordinate interpreter services to deaf and hard of hearing consumers with HIV/AIDS for any HIV-related services including but not limited to case management, medical and mental health within Los Angeles County, promote the availability of interpreter services to the deaf community and service providers, implement survey to assess consumer satisfaction of interpreter services provided….

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT in Riverside & Ventura
Brief Summary: Under the direction of the Regional Director the Receptionist/Clerk will answer and transfer all incoming TTY and voice calls, greet consumers and visitors in a professional manner, assist the Regional Director, perform clerical duties, including but not limited to typing, opening and logging all incoming mail, perform light housekeeping duties as needed. The Receptionist/Clerk will work with GLAD’s Resource Advocate regarding updates of the Directory of Resources, provides information and referral as needed, order all office supplies and maintain inventory of all office supplies, record/collect statistics on a daily basis related to provision of services.

JOB DEVELOPER/INTERPRETER in West Covina & Crenshaw
Brief Summary: Under the direction of the EDD Program Manager, the Job Developer/Interpreter will provide assistance with Job Development/Placement efforts, work in conjunction with traditional employment resources, develop employment opportunities, identify openings and opportunities for clients in need of employment assistance, other duties include job interviews, job counseling to clients and employers…

COMMUNITY ADVOCATE in Cypress
Brief Summary: Under the direction of the Regional Director, the Community Advocate will assist deaf and hard of hearing consumers in the area of communication access via TTY relay, document translation, and other duties, provide advocacy in the areas of social security, education, employment, consumer affairs, and others, record statistics on a daily basis related to provision of services, counsel deaf and hard of hearing consumers with problems related to personal and family adjustments, finances, employment, food, clothing and housing….

OUTREACH COORDINATOR in Bakersfield
Brief Summary: Under the supervision of the Director of Human Services, the Outreach Coordinator will plan and supervise the day-to-day activities of the Bakersfield Outreach office; provide direct counseling, personal advocacy and other assistance to clients of all ages; develop and implement education, advocacy and resource development efforts in the service area; ensure programmatic objectives are carried out by monitoring program progress and contract compliance. Provide ongoing consultation, support and training to staff; supervise staff. Complete progress reports to government agencies; assist in the grant writing process; seek out additional funding to expand services. Develop and implement a fundraising strategy to augment state funding sources.

Susan Grey Snapp
Director of Human Resources and LIFESIGNS, Inc.

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